Reclaiming payments into pension fund upon leaving Germany

131 posts in this topic

 

But thanks for the Info that more than 6years disqualifies you from the whole thing anyway!

Before you simply give up, why not check with the horse's mouth? Send them a query or phone and see what they say.

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I am leaving Frankfurt for Ireland in July after 3 great years here. Can anyone tell me if there is anyway I can claim back tax, pension money etc?

 

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I don't think there is any way to claim back any tax paid as you were a resident for those three years. As for the pension I know that the rule used to be less than five years you could claim/transfer the payments to another pension scheme but I am not 100% certain on this one. Perhaps somebody else would know more or check out this page: Pension refunds on leaving Germany.

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Regarding transferring pension rights back to Ireland I would have thought you would want to talk to the Irish pension authorities..

 

I see no reason why you would qualify for any income tax refund on complete years in Germany just because you are leaving. You may be able to do something for this year as you wont be here for complete year. Try contacting your friendly local Finanzamt - they are bound to inform you. You may however by liable for tax in Ireland for the months of this year whilst in GY... Enjoy sorting that out.

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Within the European Union there is in my understanding no way that you can "re-claim" contributions to the German public pension system since the EU memberstates mutually regard each others public pension system and simply "add" your German claims to the future Irish pension computation.

 

Cheerio

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I am currently living here with Aufenthalt Title and soon going to complete my 5 years which makes me eligible for Niederlassungerlaubnis.

I know with Aufenthalt status if a person leaves Germany then after 2years he can claim his pension money is it also possible with Niederlassungerlaubnis or one can only claim after retirement age.

 

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The opportunity to reclaim the employee contributions you made is available only if you leave after 5 years of working here, otherwise you have a claim on a German pension when you hit whatever the future retirement age will be (and it will almost certainly be a small pension at best).

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I thougth it was exactly the oposite, just as the OP described. You can get your money back if you leave before the 5 years. You need 5 years to apply for your NE but then it is too late to claim back your contributions.

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My husband and I are leaving Germany in less than a week and need to fill these forms out ASAP! As suggested by other TTs on this thread, we have tried calling and emailing Stefan at the bfa but haven't gotten an answer. We have also tried searching for the forms listed in the Pension refunds on leaving Germany paeg, but can't find anything. Some of the other links listed in this thread all go to the main bfa.de site, rather than the page they are trying to direct us to. Can anyone please help???

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Wondering if anyone knows what happens when you apply for your pension refund (while on a working visa) over a year ago...and then before you get it back, you move back to Germany (coming back as a spousal dependent)? Do you receive the refund back or does it automatically become your pension again?

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Hi! I'm from the UK and have been working for a German company since December 2007 and obviously I pay all the associated taxes and health insurance fees that are normal here. I'm not planning on leaving Germany any time soon but if I were to leave Germany and return to the UK, does anyone know if I would be entitled to the money I have been paying into the German state pension fund? I haven't investigated this properly yet but has the EU set up a scheme which helps EU citizens to be reimbursed if they move or return to another EU member state? I heard something about this but I'm sure how far-reaching it is and how you go about claiming any potentially owed money back through it. Any responses are massively appreciated. Thanks.

 

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No refunds, your time in Germany will be counted towards your pension in whichever EU state you retire (or possibly the one you last or longest worked in, if you retire outside the EU). Effectively you'll have a composite EU pension, but paid to you by only one state. Obviously no taxes or other social contributions will be refunded.

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graham d - I ended my working life in Germany, where I still live,

and made my 40 years contribution into the UK state pension scheme.

(Now it's only 30). Yes I get a composite EU (state) Pension - but not paid by one EU state.

The German BfA had been paying me a small German State Pension for a few years

then I qualified (by age - 65) for the UK one. There was a bit of a bureaucratic to-ing

and fro-ing between Newcastke and Berlin, but the upshot is that I get my German

state pension from the BfA and my British one paid in Euros here by the UK Dept of

Work and Pensions. I think the BfA take responsibility but let the UK authorities do

their side of the matter. It must be a lot easier for all parties concerned.

Incidentally Brits working in Germany are mugs if they do not pay UK voluntary

NI contribution to make up the full 30 years. It's cheap and you get thee money back

within a few years of pension payments - then it is pure indexed linked profit.

Best investment anyone can make.

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very true jeremy. However, I understand that there are strict rules about entitlelement to pay UK NI contributions when abroad. Put simply, it's not possible if you are paying into the German system or are entitled to (and "entitlement" is not the same as "choosing to do so(or not)" of course). ie. pretty much only possible if you have absolutely no entitlement to access the German system (which many of us who aren't involved with "could" do even if we choose not to).

 

This reduction to 30 years to build up pension favours many people outside of paid employment of course who are already<paing lower rates (whether in the UK or abroad).

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I got my money back in 2000 but it took 18 months for the BfA to do it and then I moved back to Germany. So don't make any short term financial plans thinking you are going to get all the money right away by filling out the form. I've heard from others that it can take a short as a year and as long as two. And they only give you your contribution (minus some administration costs) and not what the company paid in. Angie keeps that. Another thing to keep in mind is that 60 months includes partial months. If you started mid-month and ended mid-month that counts as 2 months towards your 60. This clause is only in the German edition of the regulation and not the English one.

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Cheers jeremy - you're right it does sound like it's easier to administer (which makes it all the more surprising that the authorities have chosen to do it that way!!)

It's good to hear it really works too... :)

 

swimmer - is that something to do with the class 2/3 NI distinction? I have a UK pension forecast which tells me which years I can pay into at which rates, but doesn't tell me any conditions (ie that I can't pay while in Germany) - I must get round to reading it properly, since my deadline for the first of the missing years is April :) (and I have only 13 or maybe 14 years worth)

 

rhody - that's a private pension right, not the state one?

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very true jeremy. However, I understand that there are strict rules about entitlelement to pay UK NI contributions when abroad. Put simply, it's not possible if you are paying into the German system or are entitled to (and "entitlement" is not the same as "choosing to do so(or not)" of course). ie. pretty much only possible if you have absolutely no entitlement to access the German system (which many of us who aren't involved with "could" do even if we choose not to).

 

This reduction to 30 years to build up pension favours many people outside of paid employment of course who are already<paing lower rates (whether in the UK or abroad).

Don't know where you got this information. I'm paying into the German system (and have been for getting on for twenty years now) and at the same time I'm paying off extra years in the UK, which I've been doing for three years now.

 

I'd double check your information here, because as jeremyhay says, this is about the best investment you could ever make!

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rhody - that's a private pension right, not the state one?

Nope - the state pension which is administered by the BfA. I am also a non-EU citizen. Basically, the SV on your pay slip.

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swimmer - I paid into both simultaneously until I had my 40 years into the UK system.

Newcastle DWP told me it was not sensible not to make the voluntary contributions - so I did,

and a good job too.

My only gripe is that if I had come here first after becoming a pensioner then the UK gov. would pay

for my Krankenversicherung. Because I get a small German state pension I have to pay for Krankenversicherung,

- and that is more than the German pension! So I would be better off without the German pension.

But perhaps I am being greedy to think this.

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