Schools with programs for gifted children

18 posts in this topic

As far as I know, there is no formal program, however, there are a couple of features of the system that might be interesting.

 

First, there is the possibility for a child to enter Gymnasium after the fourth class rather than waiting until after the sixth class. The name of the program is something like "Schnellläufer", i.e. similar to fast track. Students must apply and have competitive grades and a certain level of maturity.

 

Second, students can be moved up a class if they are sufficiently advanced and bored. I don't know how common it is, but I have met a few parents who have done this with their kids.

 

Good luck.

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My question about gifted and talented was a bit vague. Let me explain my problem a bit further: My son, who is five years old and will begin first grade in the Fall, he is being skipped over kindergarten, is in the highly to exceptionally gifted catagory. He is not gifted in any specific area, i.e.musical prodigy, but he is generally intelligent. I am worried that without properly trained gifted and talented teachers and a supported program, he will either develop behavioral problems or learn to hate school. I have discovered that Berlin International School is beginning a GT program this year, but the cost is very high and we were hoping to avoid private school, but it may be our only option.

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IQ testing is usually not done on 5 year olds, so I'm just wondering how was it determined he's highly to exceptionally gifted? What exactly does that mean as it relates to your child? In addition, in German kindergarten children learn mostly socialization skills, not preacademic skills like American kindergartens. Your child maybe very smart, however, since he's not going to kindergarten how are his socialization skills and maturity level, as socialization skills are just as important to a successful school experience as academic skills?

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LR, I can imagine that if I'd gone through the German school system, then I would have been bored to tears and ended up hating school and perhaps developed all sorts of behavioural problems. Just for you to compare, I went to preschool at age three. At four years of age I was in kindergarten, and started Grade 1 when I was five. So I had two years to be "socialised" as you put it. By six years of age, when most German kids are learning their alphabet, I was already reading and printing simple things. I wasn't pushed into learning. I was ready and willing and wanted to learn. If I had been held back for no reason other than tradition, then I would have ended up restless and bored.

 

My niece and nephew in Toronto started full time daycare at one year of age. So my nephew has had four years to be "socialised" before starting Grade 1 later this year. And he can already read and count and do (very) simple math.

 

I really don't understand the German public school system. They start a year later, they only have half-days with a teacher and are supposed to learn a lot on their own at home with massive amounts of homework. Then at age 16 many are finished with formal schooling and start apprenticeships while kids in North America still have another full year of school to go. And few public schools here have good integrated music or sports programs since the typical German school has no facilities.

 

If I had a gifted child, I'd be very leery of the German public school system. The German primary school system is geared only towards kids that fall within "the norm" and has real difficulty in dealing with kids with special needs, regardless whether slow or fast learners. So the OP is right to be concerned and search for alternatives to ensure that their child doesn't end up hating school and learning.

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LR, I can imagine that if I'd gone through the German school system, then I would have been bored to tears and ended up hating school and perhaps developed all sorts of behavioural problems. Just for you to compare, I went to preschool at age three. At four years of age I was in kindergarten, and started Grade 1 when I was five. So I had two years to be "socialised" as you put it. By six years of age, when most German kids are learning their alphabet, I was already reading and printing simple things. I wasn't pushed into learning. I was ready and willing and wanted to learn. If I had been held back for no reason other than tradition, then I would have ended up restless and bored.

 

My niece and nephew in Toronto started full time daycare at one year of age. So my nephew has had four years to be "socialised" before starting Grade 1 later this year. And he can already read and count and do (very) simple math.

 

I really don't understand the German public school system. They start a year later, they only have half-days with a teacher and are supposed to learn a lot on their own at home with massive amounts of homework. Then at age 16 many are finished with formal schooling and start apprenticeships while kids in North America still have another full year of school to go. And few public schools here have good integrated music or sports programs since the typical German school has no facilities.

 

If I had a gifted child, I'd be very leery of the German public school system. The German system is geared only towards kids that fall within "the norm" and has real difficulty in dealing with kids with special needs, regardless whether slow or fast learners. So the OP is right to be concerned and search for alternatives to ensure that their child doesn't end up hating school and learning.

I know there are Montessori schools here in upper bavaria. However, I really think if there aren't other options you have to be willing to work within the German system to get your child the support for their education that's individualized (if possible) to meet the child's need. Parents are advocates for their children and as an advocate you may have to work with the established system to benefit your child, especially if you can't afford to send your child to an expensive private school.

 

Perhaps if the OP meet with the school system and explain her child's situation maybe the school system could be more supportive or steer her in the direction where she can take her son to get the educational support he needs.

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Parents might be willing to put in the time and effort to work with the existing German public school system, but often the system isn't willing or flexible enough to work with the parents. I've already written about the problems my German niece had a few years ago. The only recourse was to place her in a private school. She's 18 now and looking forward to university. Not bad for an intelligent kid labelled too stupid for Realschule by her primary school teachers.

 

Perhaps the Montessori schools are different in Bavaria, but here they have a reputation as being a good place for developmentally slow kids, not bright or gifted children.

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Thank you very much for your comments on this topic. All of them have been usefull for my family. I would like to know the decitions and solutions you were find these years about programs, schools and advises for gifted children and their special needs, wether in Germany or not.  Thanks in advance. 

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4 minutes ago, Sarilena said:

Thank you very much for your comments on this topic. All of them have been usefull for my family. I would like to know the decitions and solutions you were find these years about programs, schools and advises for gifted children and their special needs, wether in Germany or not.  Thanks in advance. 

The last post here (before yours) was made nearly 13 years ago. If any solution were found I would guess things have changed in the meantime.

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47 minutes ago, Sarilena said:

Thank you very much for your comments on this topic. All of them have been usefull for my family. I would like to know the decitions and solutions you were find these years about programs, schools and advises for gifted children and their special needs, wether in Germany or not.  Thanks in advance. 

 

Are you only asking about Berlin? Germany is a federal country and education is the responsibility of the Bundesländer.

 

Official info for Berlin can be found here: https://www.berlin.de/sen/bildung/schule/foerderung/begabungsfoerderung/angebote-von-kitas-schulen-universitaeten/

 

However, you should be aware that Berlin does not have enough special education teachers to deal with all the children needing remedial help (and that was before the pandemic and over a year of intermittent instruction) much less a surplus for gifted children. I would advise you not to take all the claims at face value and if education is a determining factor in your decision to move get your prospective employer to offer written guarantees of what they will cover.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Sarilena said:

Thank you very much for your comments on this topic. All of them have been usefull for my family. I would like to know the decitions and solutions you were find these years about programs, schools and advises for gifted children and their special needs, wether in Germany or not.  Thanks in advance. 

 

I have worked with people who attended this school in East German times and also know people whose kids attended in the 2000s.    Students do very well in national Math and Science competitions.  

 

https://www.hhgym.de

 

There is another Math/Science magnet school in the western part of the city as well.    In addition there are magnet schools for music and a couple of other disciplines.

 

The Spanish-German Oberschule (Europaschule program) was a finalist for German School Prize in 2020.   I know people who have kids who have attended this school and they are very satisfied.

 

https://www.fosberlin.eu/home/

 

It is part of the SESB program

 

https://www.berlin.de/sen/bildung/schule/besondere-schulangebote/staatliche-europaschule/

 

 

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On 16/4/2021 11:38:03, cb6dba said:

The last post here (before yours) was made nearly 13 years ago. If any solution were found I would guess things have changed in the meantime.

Yes, I just wanted to know how the situation evolved for the commenters on the subject. 

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On 16/4/2021 12:32:35, engelchen said:

 

Are you only asking about Berlin? Germany is a federal country and education is the responsibility of the Bundesländer.

 

Official info for Berlin can be found here: https://www.berlin.de/sen/bildung/schule/foerderung/begabungsfoerderung/angebote-von-kitas-schulen-universitaeten/

 

However, you should be aware that Berlin does not have enough special education teachers to deal with all the children needing remedial help (and that was before the pandemic and over a year of intermittent instruction) much less a surplus for gifted children. I would advise you not to take all the claims at face value and if education is a determining factor in your decision to move get your prospective employer to offer written guarantees of what they will cover.

 

 

 

Thank you for the advise. We are looking for options in Germany and other European countries.

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On 16/4/2021 12:48:23, balticus said:

 

I have worked with people who attended this school in East German times and also know people whose kids attended in the 2000s.    Students do very well in national Math and Science competitions.  

 

https://www.hhgym.de

 

There is another Math/Science magnet school in the western part of the city as well.    In addition there are magnet schools for music and a couple of other disciplines.

 

The Spanish-German Oberschule (Europaschule program) was a finalist for German School Prize in 2020.   I know people who have kids who have attended this school and they are very satisfied.

 

https://www.fosberlin.eu/home/

 

It is part of the SESB program

 

https://www.berlin.de/sen/bildung/schule/besondere-schulangebote/staatliche-europaschule/

 

 

This has been very helpful. Thank you very much. There is a good program in Madrid (as an Autonomic Community), named PEAC for the enrichment and socialization of these children, but the demand is 5 times greater than the supply of places and the mayority of the schools are not prepared or dully prepared to handle the special need of the children and right know we are dealing with the consequences of not having given them due attention in time.

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