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How to introduce a female friend in German

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I'm currently in Berlin with a female friend of mine. We're sharing a room and doing the same German course, so are together pretty much all the time. Since we're meeting so many new people, it has occurred to us that we very possibly come across as lesbians, which isn't helped by the fact that 'Freundin' means both 'female friend' and 'girlfriend'. A lot of the time, when I am talking about things I have done, I say 'Ich bin mit meiner Freundin gegangen' - is there a way of saying that which makes it clear that we aren't a couple?

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Actually yes...

 

"eine Freundin von mir" is a girl friend rather than a girlfriend although you can't use it for every context (it just doesn't fit and I can't think of an example just now)

e.g. Ich bin mit einer Freundin von mir gegangen

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It's been my general experience that girls shallow enough to worry about being taken for lesbians are, in fact, the last girls that would be taken as such.

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as said above, if you want to emphasize that someone is just a friend you usually use an indefinite article instead of a definite one

 

-> "eine Freundin von mir" instead of "meine Freundin"

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It's been my general experience that girls shallow enough to worry about being taken for lesbians are, in fact, the last girls that would be taken as such.

I expected a response like that. I have nothing against lesbians whatsoever, and I am not shallow. I just wanted to make sure I was talking about my friend in the right way, since I'm not a native speaker of German and could have been blatently saying 'My partner' without realising it.

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Actually yes...

 

"eine Freundin von mir" is a girl friend rather than a girlfriend although you can't use it for every context (it just doesn't fit and I can't think of an example just now)

e.g. Ich bin mit einer Freundin von mir gegangen

 

as said above, if you want to emphasize that someone is just a friend you usually use an indefinite article instead of a definite one

 

-> "eine Freundin von mir" instead of "meine Freundin"

Thanks for the advice, I have also said that, it just seems more natural to say 'Meine Freundin' since we're almost always with each other!

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It might sound a bit too distant, but you can use 'kollegin'. I notice that Germans tend to use it beyond the usual 'colleague', to denote 'associate', etc. Besides she's doing the course with you, so is a 'colleague' too.

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Bekannte is friend without being girlfriendy.

Mitbewohnerin is always good.

Ich bin mit X hingegangen, wir teilen uns derzeit eine Wohnung - girl from shared apartment

 

Of couse anyone can read anything nasty into any word if they are so inclined.

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where did you meet your friend? I usually say things like Schulfreundin (friend from school), Jugendfreundin (teenage years), Freundin aus Kindergartenzeit/erste Arbeitsstelle etc etc etc.

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Freundin von mir, and Bekannte would both work. Kollegin I think strictly speaking means work colleague.

 

Or just wear a t-shirt saying "I'm not a lesbian". Whenever I wear mine, nobody thinks I'm a lesbian.

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You could also make up a little "I'm not a lesbian" song and dance routine, in the key of G. It's a great icebreaker too.

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How about: eine Mitbewohnerin von mir = A flatmate of mine. Course, sounds a bit strange if you only have 1 flatmate/housemate, but not sure if Meine Mitbewohnerin has the same connotations as Meine Freundin.

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not sure if Meine Mitbewohnerin has the same connotations as Meine Freundin.

Depends on the age i'd say, and on the gender. For university students, it's doesn't carry any connotations, but if you're in your mid-40s... well, a "meine Mitbewohnerin" and a little eyebrow-waggling would carry a lot of connotations. More so for mixed-gender WGs of course.

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I hate it when English speakers refer to their significant other as their "partner". To me, that always meant you were in a same-sex relationship. If you don't want to get married than just call a spade a spade -- boyfriend/girlfriend.

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I hate it when English speakers refer to their significant other as their "partner". To me, that always meant you were in a same-sex relationship.

Actually, a lot of folks in opposite sec relationships use the word "partner" in an attempt to neutralize gendered/sexual orientation connotations and make 'partner' become an ambiguous homosexual and heterosexual term.

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