engelchen

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11,271 Awesome with awesome sauce

About engelchen

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  • Location Berlin
  • Nationality Canadian
  • Gender Female

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  1. About the employment situation in the city

      Sorry @lisa13, @mako1 is right.   The Germans (especially those with traditional German HR Departments) expect that applicants sign their CVs, thereby confirming the accuracy of the contents. 
  2. Opening a small business as a non-EU foreigner

      Before you even consider quitting your day job, improve your German, attend some information sessions on starting a business in Germany, and write a business plan.   A good place to start is next weekend at deGUT (https://www.degut.de/besucherinformation)
  3. About the employment situation in the city

      What do people lie about? Do they really think that they could get away with it? (Now I'm just curious)
  4. About the employment situation in the city

    Can you afford to reject otherwise qualified applicants during the CV review for having a few minor typos?
  5. non-employed person, no tax return received

      You make too many incorrect assumptions.   It is your responsibility to file a tax return if you are required to do so.   If your friends were required to file (and I don't know if they were or not) and failed to do so, when the Finanzamt catches them they will probably be required to pay a fine in addition to any taxes owed.   I would strongly recommend contacting @PandaMunich for professional advice.      
  6. About the employment situation in the city

      2. I studied in Germany and most of the courses I took were taught in German. Despite indicating in my applications that I speak business fluent German, I can't count the times that I've been asked during or after an inverview where I learned to speak German so well. Although I've always just smiled and answered the questions, I always want to ask them what they expected.   3. I suspect (I have no real proof) that many employers assume that foreigners overestimate their language skills. Considering how many people with foreign parents who were born and raised in Berlin still don't speak proper German, I think this is especially true regarding employers in Berlin.   4. If someone has special skills that are difficult to find or there is a large enough labour shortage points 1 - 3 above don't matter anymore; then employers are grateful for anyone willing to work.   Munich has a massive labour shortage and employers are desparate for workers in almost sectors. Employers in Munich cannot afford to be picky.   Berlin has an oversupply of workers who want to stay in the city and employers in most sectors can still afford to be picky. Considering that Berlin is still the city of choice for unskilled EU hipsters, this probably won't change much in the near future.   For the record, there are many jobs in Berlin at the moment for workers who can work in German (and by that I mean have the ability to actually complete tasks in German without needing instructions translated into English every few minutes).
  7. non-employed person, no tax return received

      Not even interest/capital gains on his savings?
  8. About the employment situation in the city

      Yes, it is better than even 10 years ago. That is not my point.   What are the prospects in Berlin for university educated foreigners who are not in IT? Especially those whose German is not good enough for an office job?
  9. About the employment situation in the city

      What about all the people who are NOT in IT? Skilled doesn't always mean that someone has IT skills.
  10.   Don't give up your day job.
  11.   Considering your country opted to leave and are now dragging the process out as long as possible, I don't think that you can blame the locals for wanting to wait until the dust settles.    I would suggest contacting SOLVIT to see if they can assist you.    
  12.   If you think a coffin made from materials that should last 500 years is alright, you have not understood how things are done in Germany.   Look up the German word Ruhefrist.  
  13.   Sure, once they actually got around to opening it. The only problem is that the first assumption when the authorities find such a coffin probably won't be a pet, but rather human body parts and that would set off an investigation.   I'm not so sure that the coffin is such a good idea.    
  14.   You need to actually move there. If you want to live in Berlin, you are stuck with the sticker until they come up with a new plan.
  15.   Not in Berlin.   The ABH in Berlin is still issuing the stickers (and doesn't seem to have a plan for 2021).