tokeshu

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About tokeshu

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  • Location Baden-Württemberg
  • Nationality Australian
  • Gender Male
  • Year of birth 1970
  1. stolz sein = proud??

    Thanks for all the comments people. Appreciated muchly.
  2. stolz sein = proud??

      I wasn't about to try to write that out in pure Schwäbisch!
  3. stolz sein = proud??

    Thanks for the responses so far..so, it seems a bit mixed?  My wife's family is quite dour though - they're not prone to spontaneous displays of affection and they're very (VERY) Swabian in the 'nichts gesagt ist genug gelobt" sense. Maybe it's her upbringing...
  4. stolz sein = proud??

    Hi All Just had an interesting discussion with my German who was telling me that using the word 'stolz' in German is more often than not seen as negative and somewhat egocentric. Like, if someone says they're 'proud of their children', the connotation is that they're claiming some recognition/glory by association.   However, after much back and forth, she conceded (never happens ) that it could be a family thing because in her family nobody would use the word 'stolz' as a positive. They may say 'gut gemacht' instead for example. She grew up in an area where the Protestant church had tendrils everywhere, and to be proud was a terrible sin.   I was saying that in English (at least, the English I speak!), 'proud' can accommodate a feeling of happiness for someone based on the hard work that led to their achievement. It doesn't necessarily convey the idea that that person achieved because of something I did with them along the way. If I say I'm proud of my nephew for getting selected for the national football team in his age group, I'm acknowledging that he worked his tail off to get selected and I'm super happy for him.   She said this isn't how 'stolz' works in German.    Can someone clarify this for me?   muchos Danke!
  5. Question about Volkstrauertag

    Thanks everyone.   Yeah - I've cancelled that day. Also spoke with some neighbours who looked at me in voiceless horror.  I think I get it now 
  6. Do good psychotherapists exist in Germany?

      There is a school of therapy called Brief Therapy. At its most extreme/enthusiastic, the claim made by these guys was that you'd be feeling a lot better after the first session. Quite a few different orientations derived from this school of thought.   As others have said, sometimes it does take awhile. The cognitive restructuring that the CBT professionals do can often be a year long process - but I would shy away from anyone who wasn't at least helping their patient see they're making progress earlier than this. My humble opinion as a former professional - if there's zero change after 6 months, that person isn't the right therapist. Again, my humble opinion, there's no reason to expect change to come from a long drawn out process. Just depends where you place the focus and how the therapist helps to educate the client/patient about what they're experiencing.   Having said that, after some years counselling and teaching, I turned my back on the whole profession and I'm happy to have done so. I had so many ethical misgivings about the way psychology is practised in our society I didn't care to be a part of it any longer.
  7. Can anyone tell me how seriously this day is taken? I was planning to get together with some people to play music, but one of them has suggested moving the day or cancelling in case we get in trouble.   What is the likelihood of this happening? (I live in a small regional area, not a big city. Very religious, but I don't know that Volkstrauertag has any religious connection.)   many thanks in advance.
  8. Do good psychotherapists exist in Germany?

    Former clinical psych/therapist here (but not for a looong time!). Don't be mistaken - you can achieve an enormous amount in 6 sessions. Honestly, when I was practising, if I didn't feel as though I'd made significant progress with a patient within 6-10 sessions, I would begin questioning how effective I was being.  A lot depends on your therapeutic orientation. Psychoanalytic therapists for example will normally engage for much longer periods. Most good therapists, at least back when I was practising, would say that if they're good, they're working to put themselves out of a job.   My first impression when I came here was that German psychologists/therapists seemed to take an (for me) inordinately long time in treating their patients.
  9. Just putting this out there in case anyone knows of a suitable candidate.   I've been recruited into doing the marketing for a learning skills/preparation programme at the uni I teach at. It's all free but we require candidates to have German language skills at the B1 level and be eligible to study at a German uni.   Our programme is called PrepTec - an initiative offered by the Hochschule Furtwangen University. Our main focus is students looking to enter a STEM field. The programme will provide intensive language training (to C1 level), intercultural classes, learning skills workshops as well as mathematics and laboratory skills so that participants are exposed to subject specific German in these areas. We're happy to help anyone and there's no obligation to remain at our uni once the course is complete (although that's cool too). Winter semester isn't far away and we're hoping to get a few more enrolments before we start.   If you can think of anyone who might be interested and/or eligible, please drop me a PM for more information.   Thanks for taking the time to read this.
  10. Just putting this out there in case anyone knows of a suitable candidate.   I've been recruited into doing the marketing for a learning skills/preparation programme at the uni I teach at. It's all free but we require candidates to have German language skills at the B1 level and be eligible to study at a German uni.   Our programme is called PrepTec - an initiative offered by the Hochschule Furtwangen University. Our main focus is students looking to enter a STEM field. The programme will provide intensive language training (to C1 level), intercultural classes, learning skills workshops as well as mathematics and laboratory skills so that participants are exposed to subject specific German in these areas. We're happy to help anyone and there's no obligation to remain at our uni once the course is complete (although that's cool too). Winter semester isn't far away and we're hoping to get a few more enrolments before we start.   If you can think of anyone who might be interested and/or eligible, please drop me a PM for more information.   Thanks for taking the time to read this.
  11. The English Teacher's Corner

    Thanks JN53 This is a uni level class and I'm trying to get them to understand the value in having metaphoric speech when explaining concepts/things to someone who may not have the same background they do.   We did indeed work our way through German similes and metaphors first, then we looked at English examples, listened to some music that had similes in the lyrics, before moving it into the academic sphere. When I referenced the German examples we'd looked at they told me that that was just 'part of the language' and nothing they needed to actually learn or come up with themselves. I am personally, very much oriented this way. My normal mode of speech if I'm teaching something is often metaphoric/simile based, so I have a bit of disconnect from the outset because it's always been very easy for me.   I did try and encourage them by saying nothing they came up with would be wrong so long as I was able to understand the connection - but they struggled mightily.
  12. The English Teacher's Corner

    Has anyone had any luck teaching simile and metaphor to advanced learners?   It seems to be something that causes considerable issue - despite German having some fantastic examples itself.   Me - "Flossie - can you use a simile to describe someone who is very slow?" Flossie - "Errr...he's as slow as a....slow person?"   This was basically my whole class recently. One of the students just said "We are not creative and this is stupid" and that was that as far as he was concerned. I don't get it. I think "so dumm wie Brot" is one of the best similes I've ever come across. It's not an unknown concept here.
  13. Happy new year everyone   I've done a quick search for this and while there was a bit written about women's sizes I couldn't find much to answer my question - which is fairly straightforward.   What is the inch and or cm conversion for size 46?   I'm trying to buy a pair of sportpants online and they give this size next to M (which I'm guessing I am), but a couple of online converters tell me a size 46 is 30 inches.   I ate far too much over Christmas to be 30 inches - but if I close my eyes and wish hard enough, I'm still pretty sure I'm an 'M'!   Anyone out there more in the know than i am?   Many thanks