paulwork

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About paulwork

  1. Acceptance of sick note from a foreign doctor during vacation

    This isn't a legal answer, but a suggestion:   Try going to your German doctor to try your luck if they can retroactively at least write a note to corroborate they received a note from foreign doctor (incl ICD-10 codes?) Before they open their mouth to say something - say it would be unverbindlich and not used for krankenkasse but rather for HR dept / calculation of genuine holiday days. Throw in for good measure that wife wouldn't have sufficient time to erhol if they were unfairly deprived of "Erholungsurlaub" days.   The worst they can do is say no, but if you ask them, maybe they can write some non-binding letter which you can *at least* provide HR to claim back your holiday days spent sick. Wife wasn't exactly unentschuldigt abwesend.    Such a non-binding letter will not be enough for the krankenkasse, but should be enough to prove  *beyond reasonable doubt* that wife should be excused from work on those days.   If HR still don't accept it, there are other means to get back the equivalent of lost days - Sonderurlaub. If you're moving this year, you're allowed a day off work for that. If you have administrative affairs to tend to, you are allowed a day off work for that. Most people never bother to use those entitlements even when they could. Running around to sort out what to do with a foreign-issued sickness cert isn't exactly not admin related. This is all very picky, and I would exercise caution on playing the Sonderurlaub card with an employer you otherwise have good relations with. 
  2. Brexit and Credit

    In addition to above.   Any type of credit application that is automated / online will probably have algorithms applied. Nobody really knows what algorithms are applied to credit decision making, but a field usually asked about is identity and therefore nationality. So...   Given that even general financial markets constantly take a beating due to the highs and lows of brexit uncertainty, it would not be out of the realms of possibility that a Brit in EU / or an EU 27 in UK (and the brexit consequences / risk assessments attached) *might* get flagged as such in whatever secret algorithms are used to make automated credit decisions post-brexit.   I did all my new contracts / financial arrangements / insurance renewals this side of brexit - just to be on the safe side.
  3. Can an employer change your role within the company?

    @ExPattheDog After Probezeit, the one thing they CANNOT do, is assign you a different role without your permission AND ALSO lower your salary while doing that.   You would have to keep on earning exactly the same salary in your newly assigned (unwanted) role.    "Culture fit" sounds either overly diplomatic, or suspiciously vague.   Corporate culture is broadly the same in the same company whether you move someone from one department to another. I can't see how a "culture" can dramatically change enough simply by switching roles.    If by "culture fit" your boss is trying to be diplomatic and thinks moving you away from contact with certain individuals will help improve things, then:   a) They should say that, and evidence why that is needed instead of other options.   They have failed in their role as manager to "manage" people and find an acceptable solution. All you do by plonking a person in a different unwanted role is evade / avoid things.   For a boss to encourage the employee to resign (rather than firing them) is also very, very silly and pathetic. What are they afraid of? Lemme see... ah yes, that they already know they would lose a court battle at the Arbeitsgericht, and so stupidly demonstrate that lack of legal confidence by urging their employee to resign... 
  4. You can't use that method if you're a non-German national e.g. EU26 citizen.    EU26 citizens (or Germans who don't like the thought of using their IDs) would have to especially order and pay for the digital signature card.
  5. Though the topic is initially about pension, I think the aspect of digital signature to access govenment services is part of a wider discussion. I'm reporting here on what I just found out for pensions, which actually left me gobsmacked!   We've probably all heard about the e-initative to access German government services digitally.   Anyway, I just called the Rentenversicherung as I couldn't make head nor tail of their website on the different ways to access your pension records online.   I was under no illusions that soft and hardware would be involved.   But what I wasn't expecting, was that in order to use the eID function you have to PAY for the card readers to use on your computer to access government information about you. I was expecting it'd be govenment-provided, but nope.   The 2 options are:   1) E-id with GERMAN ONLY ID card *with* e-function specifically activated by a Beamter AND a card reader you have to order, pay for, replace if broken. (eu26 nationals in Germany therefore can't use this method, since they won't need or get issued an e-Aufenthaltstitel as the only other compatible ID card)   2) E-id with BOTH. i) digital signature card (NOT a Krankenkasse card. NOT a bank card. It's a specially printed and pressed card). You have to order, pay for and replace the card. ii) a card reader that you have to order, pay for, and replace if faulty.   They're really sly and don't mention about the costs in any of their literature. It wouldn't surprise me if you're talking about needing to fork out a few hundred Euros JUST to be able to digitally access information the government holds about you / access govt services.   I already pay my pension contributions and various taxes. I would have thought that the costs of implementing e-id are part offset by the cost-savings of going paperless + automation + labour cost savings, with any remainder cost being born by taxpayer/contributor. But nope...
  6. Just bumping this thread up since it's probably one of the last round of events about brexit.
  7. Fritzbox 7590 and BBC iplayer

    Hi guys,    I already have satellite, but I'm trying to access the one channel I don't have - BBC3. I only need to watch bbc3 / iplayer for next few weeks, for 1 show I'm interested in that's not on satellite.    It's only available online. And only with not blocked IP addresses. I have DSL + Fritzbox 7590.   No matter what VPN I use, it always says for BBC Channels I can't access them (outside country).   I have slightly better luck with channel 4 and STV. It's almost like the IP checks on bbc are stronger.   But, even when selecting another VPN IP location in UK, when checking whatismyipaddress, it is still giving me the Germany location despite being currently connected (and paying for) the desired UK VPN location.   Does anyone have any suggestions on what I might be doing wrong, and how to get bbc3 online?
  8. Correct. Can't reopen it to re-edit though.
  9. Fyi I think at the events they will be sharing the latest info from the Bundestag - brits in Germany get talked about @ Bundestag early this Friday. Presume a legal outcome will come from that: https://www.bundestag.de/dokumente/textarchiv/2019/kw39-de-brexit-freizuegigkeit-657416
  10. Hi all,    Just for info: Just before brexit hits there are a slew of Q&A info events in cooperation with British embassy / German officials / British in Germany.   So if you've got a question, want to hold the CDU government or British govt to account, highlight and clarify process gaps, or just plain want further info on brexit uebergangsgesetz, or ueberleitungsgesetz, citizenship, resideny or anything brexit-related, this is probably the last organised chance to make your voice heard.   Berlin, 30 September. Düsseldorf, 1 October. Frankfurt, 10 October. Hamburg, 15 October. Munich, 24 October.   https://britishingermany.org/2019/09/17/upcoming-information-events/
  11. Some states and cities in Germany are now activating their brexit plans, updating their web pages, and sending out letters to those affected.   It doesn't make sense to make 1 thread per state. Nor does it make sense to mix this thread with the other brexit topics. So I started this thread to collect info on which states/cities are doing what - most info is pulled via  https://britishingermany.org and social media.   Berlin - website updated with info and FAQs. https://www.berlin.de/labo/willkommen-in-berlin/freizuegigkeit-eu-ewr-schweiz/artikel.779578.en.php   Munich - website updated with info  https://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/Stadtverwaltung/Kreisverwaltungsreferat/Auslaenderwesen/Brexit.html#aktueller-status-des-aufenthaltsrechts-von-britisc_1   Saxony - Landesamt sending out short questionnaire letters to brit residents. Website updated with info: https://www.europa.sachsen.de/brexit-4886.html   Feel free to update and I'll add to the list.
  12. Hi there,    The few times in Germany I have had a refund from a shop and originally paid by debit card ec/maestro/girocard, I always got paid cash back. Maybe they didnt have the correct type of card terminals to refund back onto an ec card, ie only deduct but not give back.   Anyway, I recently got something refunded in the uk and they put the refund amount back onto my maestro/giro card from sparkasse. But its been over a week now, and it hasnt shown up in my online banking transaction history.   I have the uk card refund receipt which I can show my german bank, but I'm just wondering who to approach and what to do if a few days after the easter break the refund amount still hasnt hit my account.   Has anybody had stuff refunded back onto their german card while outside germany? How long did it take?