dstanners

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About dstanners

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  • Location NRW
  • Nationality British

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  1. After 2017 election: The center holds

    After all the discussion about Brexit and Trump, it's probably worth considering things closer to home. I was glad Laschet won today. I'm not really a fan of him, he's been pretty useless during the corona pandemic and wasn't exactly setting the world alight as an MEP. The main thing is that he's NOT Merz. Can't stand that guy. I suppose Laschet is more of a "safe pair of hands" candidate: there are certainly worse things to be.
  2. Brexit: The fallout

    ...and she must really hate her grandkids!
  3. Buying a house without realtor

    I know this is tongue in cheek, the point is really valid. If things go pear-shaped, it's far easier to make a claim against a gutachter (who will 1) have put his advice in writing and 2) be insured) than it will be against someone who by definition is b@ggering off somewhere else!
  4. Laws on clearing snow and liability

    ...and which bin would they even go in!
  5. Laws on clearing snow and liability

    That would make sense, but I've been told (around here at least) that we aren't allowed to put salt down. No idea if it's because we're in a national park, but they definitely don't do it. Haven't checked with grit, but I haven't noticed neighbours using it.
  6. Laws on clearing snow and liability

    So, we've got tonnes of snow here in the glorious Eifel at the moment, so I go out in the bl00dy mornings, to shovel away the soft freshly fallen snow from the path to my house, and do the same for the old lady who lives nearby. I do this because I understand it's the law (for me that is, I do it for the elderly neighbour because I'm not always a complete ar$ehole). However, it seems to me that I make the path MORE dangerous to pedestrians. I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete. Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?
  7. Laws on clearing snow and liability

    So, we've got tonnes of snow here in the glorious Eifel at the moment, so I go out in the bl00dy mornings, to shovel away the soft freshly fallen snow from the path to my house, and do the same for the old lady who lives nearby. I do this because I understand it's the law (for me that is, I do it for the elderly neighbour because I'm not always a complete ar$ehole). However, it seems to me that I make the path MORE dangerous to pedestrians. I would find it far safer if the old lady could plant her feet on fresh snow, rather than the compacted thin layer of ice which always remains after shovelling. If she fell, it'd be far safer to have a cushioning layer of snow, rather than 1mm of thin ice on concrete. Why do the natives prefer the thin layer of ice to fresh snow?
  8. Brexit: The fallout

    I just read that d:ckhead Carswell's statement to the MCPP. It ends with: " we can win this fight for freedom. "  From whom is Mississippi trying to be free?  
  9. Brexit: The fallout

    Absolutely, that's why the deal was such a cr@p one for the UK. The only time for a good deal on financial services was when the UK had at least some sort of bargaining position (even if weak). Access to EU financial markets should have been the exchange for allowing EU exporters unrestricted access to UK markets. Now that ship has sailed and the UK is left seeking access to EU markets in exchange for....good will, an amusing anecdote, pity?    F@nnying about with a minor improvement on fish just made it look as though BJ was getting some sort of victory, whilst he completely forgot the key part of the deal from a UK perspective. Financial services needed to be front and centre for the UK. I'm still amazed what an easy ride he is getting about the deal from the UK press (and as far as I can tell, public). Sounding like a toff and dropping Greek/Latin references into day to day speech some how seems to have persuaded people in the UK he isn't an idiot. It's quite an achievement.    
  10. Brexit: The fallout

    As a former Erasmus student, I was also particularly sad by that seemingly small but significant change, given how many of my friends have ended up working, living and even marrying in various EU countries resulting from our experiences that year. So, I've had a look at the replacement, and unsurprisingly it demonstrates a complete lack of understanding of Erasmus. One of the key educational benefits was mutual recognition of the qualifications/time spent in the partner universities across all of the member states. The new scheme will require a university to university approval, which will make it hugely time consuming and costly for any institution looking to participate. Given staying in Erasmus was an option, the UK are simply trying to re-create a wheel when the old one was fine. As has previously been mentioned, going to non-EU countries will be far more expensive for students (health insurance issues, visa requirements as well as the practical matter of costs, given that the EU is next door).  
  11. Brexit: The fallout

    Well, that's one way of putting it. Another way would be that the points you specified: rebate, no Euro, preferential treatment actually highlight that once upon a time there were UK governments who were decent negotiators within the EU, and what a bad decision it was to leave. The rebate was justifiable: the UK was a large net contributor and had specifically little to gain from the EU's biggest cost: CAP. Not joining the Euro also proved to be helpful, given that there was never sufficient alignment of the economies (financial let alone political) at the time it was set in stone. Getting other preferential treatment was also possible within the EU as you highlight. All reasons which should have left the UK feeling rather smug in the group, rather than ambivalent about leaving.
  12. Brexit: The fallout

    ...well, surely £350m per week...oh, b@lls, hang on... So, I guess one "silver lining" would be the ability to move away from the time consuming public procurement rules, which should make it faster, cheaper and more efficient for the government to buy stuff. Of course, that "benefit" only works in theory, or with a half-way honest government. The current UK government has been ignoring those rules already, and the result has been direct awards worth billions of pounds to companies owned/controlled by their mates. So, rather than leaving the "beaurocracy" leading to efficiency and flexibility it has led to cronyism....hmmm, ok, I might need a bit longer on the silver lining thing...   I actually had a London client this morning asking me whether "this Brexit stuff" means it could be difficult sending UK contractors to placements in Germany. I think he was expecting a more nuanced answer than "yes".  
  13. Brexit: The fallout

    Not least because Switzerland is effectively in the single market. If the UK wants to be as prosperous as Switzerland, perhaps that is something it could consider joining too!   
  14. Brexit: The fallout

    Generally I think it's a pity when the comments on this thread go off topic, but I'm happy to make an exception here. @engelchen, I'll ignore your suggestion that the Irish and Canadian stuff commonly found here can seriously be considered as "cheddar", because I'm far more interested to know your source of German cheddar. I'd love to give it a go. My brother makes his own cheddar, but I'm not that keen on having the whole house smell like sour milk for a few weeks. Fortunately, my delivery from the Cheddar Gorge Cheese Company turned up this morning, so the worst impact of the cheddar-based Brexit downsides won't hit me for a couple of weeks yet.  As if it wasn't bad enough that the t0ssers in charge of the Great-Brexit-Balls-Up forgot that the UK makes its money selling financial services, it transpires they also forgot about the cheddar loving masses.     
  15. A British-style curry for the homesick

    Here goes for my effort at curry 101: Really basic curry sauce: chop and fry onions and chillies in a pan with some oil. Add a tin of tomatoes about two minutes later. Chuck in some coriander, cumin oh and a bit of turmeric for colour and smell (fresh coriander is often available at Rewe/Edeka). Fry some meat quickly and turn it to get some colour on all sides. Once it’s no longer pink on the outside, pour the sauce all over it, and let it simmer away on a low heat for, say 30 minutes. Boil some basmati rice in the meantime. I'm not a big koelsch drinker, but I find Reissdorf works pretty well to wash down a curry (if they don’t sell Koelsch around your neck of the woods, then I imagine a mildish pils perhaps Astra would do the job too).