sos-the-rope

Supporters
  • Content count

    1,054
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

395 Excellent

1 Follower

About sos-the-rope

  • Rank
    Veteran

Profile Information

  • Location Frankfurt am Main
  • Nationality British
  1. Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

      I mean, the key word in the example cited (which I haven't fact checked, but seems familiar from my own process) is "proven" - if you can show some evidence, they have to look at it. I carried tons of letters, certificates, etc. for all kinds of extra-curricular stuff around with me to prove my "integration". Some of it I requested specially from people who I'd worked with e.g. kindergarden staff for the parents' comittee. They do have to have evidence, not just a statement from you.   I assume in his case it's more about the residence though. They really should have a class-applicable route for EU civil servants who've lived for X months in every single EU state but not enough in any one state to qualify, especially if you worked directly for the EU. But "should" doesn't make the laws.
  2. Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

      To be fair you don't need to be in an official association ("Verein") to do any of the things listed there, you could just volunteer and get a certificate or something.
  3. Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

      I think you're justified in feeling it's ridiculous.   The standards for citizenship are just that, standards, and rather minimal ones too. They're not meant to cover every possible case, and yours, though not 100% unique I imagine, is indeed not run of the mill.   I'd just keep on stolidly looking around for options, maybe the various authorities involved will find some ways to accomodate the more common groups who's fallen through these cracks?
  4. Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

      How intermittent?
  5. Brexit: The fallout

      Maybe that picture was the summary?
  6. Statutory time off work for a job interview?

      That's absolutely becoming my preferred option, sad as it is.   The upside is being nice and chilled for the actual interview, and being able to relax and have fun the rest of the day as a reward for doing it.   Feels stupid to have to keep it this big secret though.
  7. Statutory time off work for a job interview?

        Ah, apparently the normal situation is that you never leave a job, you have to hide the fact you’re even considering other options?   sheesh, this country. First time I’ve said that in all the time I’ve been here!
  8. Changing mind about a job before starting

      Why would you even consider doing this? You have 2 offers, pick one and tell the others sorry?
  9. Changing mind about a job before starting

      Again, why would you even consider this?   why would you throw away a signed contract for the hope of maybe a job offer?   why wouldn’t you just explain you have signed a contract and the new kid on the block better offer something more concrete for you to change your mind and put everyone to that trouble?
  10. Changing mind about a job before starting

      Wait, what?    Are you seriously suggesting throwing away a signed job contract for a “gut feeling”?!   why not honour the contract, meet with the headhunter anyhow, and consider leaving the “second best” option if something better actually comes along?!   how much of this you mention to the “second” headhunter is up to you, I would be fairly cautious until I saw some specific options from them and started talking about setting interviews at least.
  11. Statutory time off work for a job interview?

      Just an ordinary permanent contract, which is still valid.   i loved finding all these links which assumed the reader was in some sort of crisis situation and only passing references to a normal situation.
  12. Statutory time off work for a job interview?

      I can translate too. Did you read the Zeit article? In any case, chill, seems pretty clear already.
  13. Statutory time off work for a job interview?

    Seems like you do from the usual Zeit article (answer is buried in a later paragraph so read down before explaining here how I didn’t read it):   https://www.zeit.de/karriere/beruf/2015-06/arbeitsrecht-befristung-freistellung-bewerbung
  14. Do I get a no-strings day’s leave from my current work to attend an interview with a potential new employer?   is it like in the UK where you just mention to your boss that you have an interview on such and such a day, and you just pop it in the calendar? Or do people typically take paid annual leave? Or something else?