ggg05a

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Posts posted by ggg05a


  1.  

    Lookie lookie

     

    Your Brother is only allowed to fill up his own vehicle... if his wife has a car too, then she has her own card...

     

    I personally know the Manager of the Filling station at Mainz Kastel.

     

    Fantastic, don't care.

     

    EDIT - I also fill up in Austria and Luxembourg as much as possible. :lol: Anything I can do to aggravate B90 Die Grünen voters, I'll do it.

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  2.  

    And you and your Brothers abuse of the system is the very reason why "millitary" priviledges get taken away

     

    We aren't abusing the system. Those privileges are for any member of the American Military or their guests. I am a guest. The privileges that were taken away had to deal with importing Cars and other expensive items, avoiding the Zoll and Einfuhrausgleichsteuer.

     

    You and facts are having a bad day today.

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  3. This isn't a tax. Its health insurance, which I already have. The fee for not having health insurance is a tax. Please get your facts straight before opining. Unless you think I should pay for health insurance twice, then I would suggest your parents did believe in abortion and failed while trying to attempt it.

     

    This is an Equal Protection case, as the tax code is treating men and women differently. You see, in the United States, its required by law to treat men and women equally. There is none of the "Frauenquote" nonsense. So, in order for the law in the United States to treat men and women differently, there must be a compelling governmental interest, proved by the American government in court for the law. In this case, making American men in Germany pay for Health Insurance twice, or alternatively requiring men to pay an additional tax merely because of their sex -- when women are not required to do so, would have to be proved by the IRS as a necessary to advance a compelling government interest.

     

    Based on the case law I've already looked at, and based off other Amis at my office I've talked to -- this should be a slam-dunk and we probably would never even have to go to trial -- MSJ and be done with it.

     

    Source -- I am an American attorney.

     

    Oh, and I have a brother stationed at Rammstein, so whenever I go south of FFM I get cheap gas, cheap groceries and low-and behold, I can even buy cheap (NON GREEN) lightbulbs.

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  4. Um, I am fully insured -- in Germany. The problem is me being a guy and single (no females in my family here which rely on my health insurance) prevents me from acquiring certain types of Birth Control, which is where the problem is. Birth Control is a massive political issue in the United States, and either

     

    A) Whoever wrote the law overlooked ex-pats and foreign insurance

    B) This is political posturing in the US.

     

    I imagine its both of the above.

     

    But do explain to me why I should pay over $200 a month to have access to birth control in the United States, when

     

    1) I *cannot* use it

    2) I do not live in the United States.

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  5. I hope Putin takes Crimea and all of Eastern Ukraine.

     

    If the Russian parts of Ukraine want nothing to do with the EU (and I cannot blame them) then, democratically, these people should chose where their destiny lies. If they decide to go with Russia, fine, if they decide to go with the EU, then fine. Democracy has to be the key to the future of Ukraine, or whatever its regions want to do.

     

    I for one am giddy at the thought of Putin and Lavrov giving the finger to HvR, Schultz, Barroso and Ashton. The quicker the EU quits expanding, the quicker the thing dies, the quicker history can put this silly experiment behind us. (Although the original thought was very good -- the EU has been plagued with horrible/abysmal execution)

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  6. The ACA has thrown a massive monkey wrench for Amis living abroad in Germany.

     

    I have insurance through the company I work for here in FFM, but it apparently does not meet all the criteria required by the ACA (ObamaCare) and the IRS (who administers ObamaCare) is telling me I have to purchase an American health insurance policy in conjunction with my German policy for north of $200 per month.

     

    I am seriously hoping I do not have to sue the IRS over this, but it is looking that way.

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  7.  

    - for the "empty" trip you could place a free advert on TT - with a bit of luck you would be able to fill up the van!

     

    That isn't a bad idea. Then again, there is the chance that I cannot find anything and hose myself with costs.

     

    The gas isn't what screws me, is the cost per kilometre which is what is devastating.

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  8.  

    If you can drive a van with your licence, why don't you do so, drive from FFM to MUC, pick up your stuff and go back?

     

    Alternatively, have you tried the larger rental agencies at the airport? I know in England that you can hire from one airport and "return" at another...

     

    The problem is that these van rental companies only include something stupid like 200 kms included. Then when you add gas driving empty, it gets super expensive quickly.

     

     

    Did you try Hertz Trucks?

     

    I don't know where you looked, but the Europcar website says one-way rentals are possible; an extra charge is only incurred for trips to or from Westerland/Sylt.

     

    I'm sure both have pick-up/drop-off stations in Munich and Frankfurt.

     

    Yes, I looked at Hertz. All the tabs say "Rufen Sie uns an"

     

    Seems flagrantly retarded I cannot book this online and have to make a phone call to reserve a cargo van.

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  9. Hey All;

     

    As I plan my move to Germany, I have all my stuff from my previous time in Germany in storage in Munich. I will be working in Frankfurt. I have been searching for a way to rent a cargo van from Munich to Frankfurt.

     

    I have looked at;

     

    SixT

    Europacar

    Hertz

    Enterprise

    Avis

     

    And they all essentially tell me either one of two things;

     

    A) Sorry, we don't do 1 way rentals. Oh and the Kms included are not enough to get you there and back without us doubling down on the price.

     

    B) Oh sure, we do one way rentals. You just need to find locations that accept 1 way rentals. (After 2 hours on the above websites, I can get no combination of pickup and drop off destinations to take 1 way rentals).

     

    ---

     

    So my question is what equivalent of UHaul exists in Germany, and where can I find these vans to rent?

    Are there any other companies that do this more exclusively, or would it just be better to pay someone to move the stuff for me?

    I realise that Germans don't move like this very often, so I don't expect the choices the be as great as in the US, but I just cannot believe that the only option is to have to spend 5 hours in the van driving empty from one city to the next at 0,32€ per kilometers at 1.45€ per litre diesel just so I can move my stuff.

     

    I have both a German Class-B drivers license as well as an American drivers license.

     

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

     

    Also, I am sure this has been covered before, and I searched with the search function above, but it came up with 0 results for "van rental," so I assume the search option is broken.

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  10. I read this thread, which answered my questions. I wish I had found it before posting. Thanks admin for the merger.

     

    On an aside, how inconvenient to have to go to the KFZ twice. You would think it would be possible to have any KFZ issue any plates to compensate for this problem. I'd even pay the extra 60€ or so if I didn't have to spend 5 hours waiting in line to get this done a second time.

     

    Again, thanks admin.

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  11. I racked up 8 pts in 2 weeks once.

     

    You'll probably get a 1 month "Fahrverbot." You have to take your license to the local police station, where the police will get a good laugh at you, because you're a foreigner and got your license suspended. It isn't that big of a deal, just try to pay attention to the speed limit and don't tailgate.

     

    If you listen to German radio, many of them will have a "Blitzer Report" where they will tell you where the cameras are. Always a good idea to pay heed to.

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  12. Hey Everyone,

     

    Last time I purchased a car in Germany, the dealer did not give me temporary tags to drive the car home, and get permanent tags. I had to work my way through the KFZ for HOURS to get a 5 day tag just to be allowed to drive my car home after I purchased it, just to have to go to the KFZ again for hours and hours.

     

    Is this standard operating procedure in Germany when you purchase a car in a different city than where you will be registering it, or was the dealer last time just being lazy and taking advantage of an ignorant "Ami?"

     

    Thanks!

     

    Keywords for future use;

     

    Kurzzeitkennzeichen, Temporary License Plates, Kennzeichen, License Plates, Car Purchase, Dealer, Red License Plates

     

    [adminmerge][/adminmerge]

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  13.  

    Though it doesn't make you a millionaire, it's still pretty high. He makes as much after taxes as a (decently paid) scientist would earn in their first years before taxes.

    In my field (startup companies in Berlin), this is more or less what C-level (CFO, CTO, CSO etc.) executives earn.

     

    You may earn more in the US, but you also need to spend/save more there. In germany, such a salary will definitely put you in the top 15%, perhaps even top 10%.

     

    It doesn't take much to be top 10% here does it?

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  14.  

    Ah well, ggg05a: I´m not an economist nor a politician. I used to be very left wing..very! Sort of Che Guevara generation..but without violence. You got it: John Lennon-ish!

     

    Now? Neither left nor right. I try hard to be human ( but without labels ).

     

    Mind you, Germanic v. Latin....

    Some truth there.

    Ok, Greeks aren´t Latin but there IS often a difference in the way things are done.

    Greed is universal if you can get away with it.

    Back to Greece: you know, there´s this village where we know people. There´s this little apartment and it was rubble till last year. Old stones. We were visiting ie ancient Brit and German girlfriend.

    We were noticed in the village and we stayed there for a couple of months anyway. Brother-in-law of the ancient Greek and some young locals built an apartment...". Work finished. " we offer special price..AT LEAST 95,000 euros ".

     

    We asked around. He paid 3,000 euros for the stones and likely not registered ( another guy said it belonged to his grandfather..long dead..and no one had registered ownership!).

    A couple of German friends there mentioned he had offered them the place for 30,000 euros!

     

    Can´t remember my original point but probably something along the lines of human greed. Whether Germanic or Latin or Paraguayan.

     

    Good story.

     

    The thing is, the Germanic v Latin block, its not something bad. It doesn't make the Germanic countries better than the Latin countries or vice-versa. What it does provide is two different economic models that are mutually exclusive with one another. There is no sense of "European Unity" that will overcome thousands of years of history and spending ideal and savings.

     

    I read an interesting article a while back that discussed the reason for the divergence between the Germanic/Scandinavian model and the Latin model, and it has to do with climate. For the thousands of years when Europe was agrarian, those people living in what is now the Latin block, enjoyed almost a year round growing season. Due to the average higher temperatures what they grew did not save very well. Therefore, if they produced more than they consumed it went to waste. However, in places that are now Germanic and Scandinavian, due to the shorter growing season, if people didn't produce more than they consumed to save, during the winter months they would starve to death. This process repeated for thousands of years, every year. It engrained into these cultures their respective spending and saving (and working) habits.

     

    Thereafter the industrial revolution, when people left the fields and moved into the cities leaving farming to industrialised farmers, and the advent of more efficient transportation, the northern countries produced all year long while still consuming less than they produced and saving, whereas the habits of thousands of years of temperate-climate agrarianism caused the divergence you see in culture in the southern part of Europe.

     

    Then add in the common currency, whereas before the common currency, the southern European nations could "print more" to devalue their currency against the various Schillings, Marks, Kroners, etc., to make imported goods expensive and domestically produced goods cheap. However once the Euro was introduced, the South's only ability to compete with the North (via weak currency) was taken away, and their either have to reform their cultures to compete with the northern cultures (as making the northern cultures less competitive in a world economic is just flat dumb), or leave the currency.

     

    Oh well, I got off on a tangent. Sorry all.

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  15.  

    You are probably correct. I wonder if landlords can then call themselves "Makler" and take the penance for themselves.

     

    I have told this story before. We recently rented out our rental ourselves. We had one showing on a Sat. for a few hours. I think it was over 30 people who said (begged) that they wanted it and left all of their particulars with us. We really liked most of them and their particulars. Winnowing it down to one person was a nightmare. When we proudly informed that person that they got it, they decided they didn't want it. Same with the next and the next and so on. We wound up eating another month's rent just to get somebody in the damn thing. My Ger man had to drive to Austria for her to sign the contract. That, sir, is one reason why many landlords choose to use Makler.

     

    That sounds horrible. Sorry it was so tough.

     

    When I moved in to my last apartment I arrived on the 17. Mai and booked myself a hotel room for 2 days. I was blissfully ignorant and figured "hey it takes 30 minutes to get an apartment in the US, surely it wouldn't be a problem in Germany." I looked at 3 apartments. One was much to big, one was small and lacked a balcony. Between the two I told the smaller one I would take it, and was preparing to bring the cash to the Makler when another popped up on ImmoScout, I looked at it, called the Makler and told him I no longer would take his place, as I needed a place to move in the next day (one with the makler was like "oh yeah, well you have to wait until the end of the month to occupy the empty apartment ... <_< ) and that was that.

     

    I got very lucky, and don'T foresee that happening to me again in the future.

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  16.  

    I don't think 70k is all that much. Its not little by any stretch, certainly above average, but its not a super high salary in Germany. You wont be breaking bread with the elite.

     

    And I do not agree with the animosity part. This is just a shitty thing to go through. I've moved to 4 different cities in Germany and.. wait for it... over 17 times in Munich within a year and half.

     

    What you are going through is a dip in motivation. But its simply a numbers game. So stay at it. It will get better and you should be ready to make a few compromises.

     

    At least that's what I've been telling myself the last few days

    Now, go outside and take on a walk on the safe streets of this country and you'll feel better tomorrow.

     

    EDIT: Changed a few bits because I missed the part where you are still in the US right now.

     

    I can only imagine trying to find an apartment in Munich. My sincerest condolences. I have had friends do it before, and its next to impossible unless you know someone.

     

    Why have you moved so much within a year and a half?

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  17. john g., I wouldn't hold your breath on that last sentence. The EMZ has found itself in a position of mutual exclusivity, whereas what is good for the Germanic and Scandinavian country is bad for the Latin block, and vice-versa. You'll see a lost generation of youth as long as the Euro is allowed to exist in its current form.

     

    (Before anyone jumps on me for this, this isn't a political argument, but an economic one. Before you jump on me as being some far right winger, ask yourself if you want to discuss this from a political or economic point of view. I have no interest in EU politics as they are just as dysfunctional as American politics, if you want to talk economics then I am all ears and would love a spirited discussion.)

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  18.  

    Well, if you don't like Hartz IV, you can go e.g. to Poland and experience the number of homeless people, beggars and criminals. Isn't it better not to contribute to "generous" welfare, get high crime level instead and start paying to the police and private security firms?

     

    Right wingers love calculating direct cost of welfare system, but forget indirect cost: what we will pay if the benefits to be scrapped at all.

     

    First, I am no right-winger. Lets get that straight right off the bat.

     

    Second, no, without a doubt there is a good balance to the social welfare model that we in the United States have been unable to replicate. I am not advocating for the elimination of the welfare model (after all, I am taking a PAYCUT to come to Germany), but merely pointing out that it must be restricted in certain ways, else it is unsustainable, due to the supply of those who pay in, versus the potential demand of those who take out.

     

    Does that make sense?

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  19.  

    Indeed, people are so embarrassed that they might be considered scroungers that they don't apply for benefits they could get to heat their homes or eat. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/archives/29364

     

    I'm sorry, the "but think of the poors" argument carries absolutely no weight with me. Its not that there aren't many people who could need/use the help. I just know that there is a fixed amount of money out there, and there are many more poor people than "well off" people, which according to someone on the forum is just a tad under 40.000€ per year. In order to "raise up" the standard of living of the poors via social welfare, that money must come from somewhere, people like me.

     

    Call me whatever you want, but I am not willing to give up my quality of life to help support people with whom I am not acquainted.

     

    I have no idea who The Von is/was.

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  20.  

    Great, so even though no-one has qualified official statistics, you're still going to denounce everyone who might need support from the state as 'moochers'

     

    Absolutely. If you read the course of the thread (which apparently you did not) I clarified my statement later. However, if people move to another country and take out more than they put in, you have a material problem.

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