peterLP

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Posts posted by peterLP


  1. 7 hours ago, GoldenLizard said:

     

    How about an Obama shirt with a MAGA hat: :D

     

     

    Thats brutal! My kids don't have blond hair, blue eyes, white skin or a German surname. That was never a factor here, but I recognize that the SF Bay Area is a world apart - a melting pot.

     

     

    You are right, the feedback I got was from some colleagues who came to Germany some 35+ years ago.

     

     

    Am so glad to have run into you @MikeMelga on this forum. Honestly, I never kept track of my kids in school here. Will make sure not to repeat the mistake in Germany. And hopefully all turns out fine.

     

    @GoldenLizard - I will concur with most of what @MikeMelga says. I would also suggest that you keep a positive mental attitude to the whole experience - your children will rely on you for this, and it will help them!! 

     

     I will share some of my story(and some opinions) in the hope that it helps you.

     

    By way of background, I am an Australian and we moved to Germany 3 years ago - to Dortmund. We have now lived just south of Munich for a bit over a year. We have 2 daughters. We have no German ancestry, and my daughters spoke zero German when we arrived. They were 6 and 8 yrs old. Both went to Grundschule (primary school). Both were fluent in German before the end of the first year. Kids between 4 and 10 (generally) are "soaks" for languages, so this will be much easier for them than you. Plus, they speak German every minute at school, unlike me for example, hired partly on the basis of my english language skills; so my working day is 98% english (and for a German company).

     

    During the 1st year of school we experienced local children with little social skills (like WOW !!) and a lot of bullying. This was so bad that I came home from work early one day and went straight to the school to speak to the Principal. Needless to say, we had some stern words about rights to personal safety in the EU, responsibility to protect children in the modern world etc etc. He was genuinely shocked that his PE teacher had lost control of her class so badly. But we got past this and by the time we moved to Bavaria, there were many heartfelt cards and gifts and "speeches" by teachers, parents and children alike. 

    Here in Bavaria, similar experience: children tend to have very little experience with socialising outside a small group, have almost zero direction from parents about how to welcome new people; and they generally behave in a brutish fashion. And the idea of "engagement" with students - as part of the teaching repertoire - is non-existent. So, in all, it is quite the opposite of more progressive systems in other countries... :)

    So, this is pretty much was Mike Melga said, right....? yep.

     

    But, with support for your kids, and a clear message to the teachers that you are watching the progress of your kids, you will have a very good chance of succeeding brilliantly. Mine have, so yours can too.

     

    My eldest is starting her first year in gymnasium in a few weeks - and she achieved an outstanding "entrance" score..in the top percentage of her class (yet she is an auslander). And from now on, the fact that she is fluent in 2 languages already makes learning the 3rd at gymnasium (French) so much easier. All her German friends have quite limited English skills - so now she is in a better position than most of her peers. This is particularly the case in light of the fact that her friends have only ever been to one school in their whole lives and now they are nervous about high school. My daughter is thinking " I've already been to one school in Australia and 3 schools here - so going to high school with people I already know is sooo easy". and she now knows a LOT more about how to make new friends.  :) 

     

    Another "trick" is to continue to encourage your kids to hook up with other foreigners too. For us Australians, it is second nature - mostly cos all of us aussies are foreigners basically. :)  But we have seen that our daughters' friends have shown increasing interest in meeting our other non-German friends - works well! There are other australians, Indians and Brazilians, for example that we "hang with", and our German friends always want to know more about them.

     

    ...so, you will be performing a valuable public service for Germany in bringing your kids here and adapting to, but also changing in a small way, the way things happen here. :lol::lol:

     

    overall, i am so, so, very, very happy that we moved here. It has been the brilliant growth and learning experience for my daughters and for my wife and I that we hoped for - and for the usual reasons: constant surprises, differences, and "left-field experiences"...

     

    ...so I am very happy to connect and help in any way I can...i suggest we start with a beer or two. (double thumbs up on that)

     

    ...anyway, hope this far-too-long-post helps :P

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  2. Hi scyrus,

     

    Firstly, let me say that German consumer law is quite backwards - behind the times, so to speak - so the usual circumstances means that you would be obliged to pay the full amount even though you will not be using the services. Where I come from, this situation was relegated to the Dark Ages.

    Anyway, with COVID impacting so many things, there might be hope for you - but don't hold your breath on this.

     

    So, I suggest you contact this organisation - a consumer law centre - and see what they say. There will likely be a modest contribution required if they help you (€15-€20 or thereabouts), but it will be proper advice for you:  https://www.verbraucherzentrale-bayern.de/kontakt-by

     

    good luck!

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  3. On 2/7/2020, 1:18:23, Jodawa said:

    Oh I know!! Unfortunately I’m from a mining, heavy manufacturing background.

    My career history is 27+ years in Technical sales, International business development in the mining and heavy equipment manufacturing/repair industries throughout Canada/USA/South America. 

    yeah, sorry to hear about the issues. I'm an aussie who misses the hell out of living by the coast, that's for sure. I bet that's part of what you miss too (But I'm in Bavaria, beside a lake...it's better than NO water, but it ain't the sea).

    otherwise, I have found it relatively easy to make new friends here (yeah, I'm super lucky)...But, I still can't replace those mates back home that I've known for 30 years (not that I want to, but you know what I mean)...i ride motorcycles, which gives me a very personal escape when I want it...as well as something to share with others, from any countr...i love chatting to peeps on the Alps in summer - english, italian, canadian, polish, whatever...all fantastic!

    ...it sounds a bit cliche, I suppose, but take up a hobby - ride a motorcycle, start a martial art or crossfit or squash or hiking...anything where you focus on a shared experience of "something", and you will make friends...it is defo a good idea to make friends outside your work group too!...again, it sounds cliche and old-fashioned, but it really does help...

     

    ...and you are right next to France...very cool. you have two cultures to choose from!

     

    ...and if you are ever down Bavaria way, let me know, we can catch up for a beer, share stories...

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  4. @anonymousgerman: As you likely have a contract, just make sure that your baseline is that you get the minimum required within that. It is also worthwhile to get a lawyer, yes.

    I suggest (as an ex-lawyer) that you identify the questions you need answered...make a list...refine it...make sure you know what you want to know, and then go see the lawyer. ( it is the best use of your time - and the cheapest way to make use of legal services).

    I have been working in a start-up...never again for me. Too many numpties...but that's just my limited experience.

    Good luck with it - I am sure you will be fine (...and don't forget the Zeugnis impacts (the long game, so to speak) )...

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  5. On 11/3/2019, 8:52:34, Aussiedog said:

    Even after all these years here...I cannot bring myself to be, or can ever imagine myself being, an apologist for

    The German Way of Life.

    Sorry ;-)

    ...yeah, me too. I still can't figure out how some aspects of behaviour don't have different consequences here...it's curious, for sure.

     

    On 11/1/2019, 11:42:54, emkay said:

    Good point Lisa!  On a positive note then...even after all these years, we're all very happy to have moved to Germany and our lives are probably much better here than they would have been had we stayed in the UK

    ..I was never living in the UK :)

    but, even after "all" these years (2), I am still wondering why German children in the street will break away from what they are doing and ride a bike/scooter/rollerblades along the street right next to you and your daughters and NOT SAY A WORD...even when you say "hallo"....weird man, weird...and has happened 3 times in two Länder.... :) whaaaaa...?

    (PLEASE NOTE: Not a complaint, but a serious question about curious behaviour...)

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  6. On 11/1/2019, 11:42:54, emkay said:

    Good point Lisa!  On a positive note then...even after all these years, we're all very happy to have moved to Germany and our lives are probably much better here than they would have been had we stayed in the UK

    ..I was never living in the UK :)

    but, even after "all" these years (2), I am still wondering why German children in the street will break away from what they are doing and ride a bike/scooter/rollerblades along the street right next to you and your daughters and NOT SAY A WORD...even when you say "hallo"....weird man, weird...and has happened 3 times in two Länder.... :) whaaaaa...?

    (PLEASE NOTE: Not a complaint, but a serious question about curious behaviour...)

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  7. On 9/8/2019, 9:39:52, john g. said:

    I was hoping nobody would notice that, French! :lol:

     

    I missed the final couple of hours and got home ( I had left the radio on!) and heard someone say " so we will now talk to the winníng Australian captain "..or something horrible!! :ph34r:

     

    I knew...then..

    .."something horrible"...? sound like music to my ears.... :)

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  8. 36 minutes ago, tokeshu said:

    I would miss the bread for sure.

    I would miss going to work in casual clothing a lot.

    I would miss goodness. I think people here are generally very good well meaning people.

    I would miss Swabian food. Probably more than I care to admit.

    I would miss Schwarzwald.

    I would miss environmental awareness and the appreciation that we belong to something larger.

    I would miss the social mindedness.

    I would miss the love of learning.

    I would miss the bookshops.

    I would miss living close to so many other countries.

    I would miss the regionalism and the attitude that not everything needs to be big or a spectacle to have value.

     

    I wouldn't miss the heaviness. There's nothing light about this place at all (where I live anyway).

    I wouldn't miss the horrifically limited choice in foods.

    I wouldn't miss the weather.

    I wouldn't miss the customer service.

    I wouldn't miss feeling like I'm walking through an ashtray wherever I am (even on a walk in the countryside the ground is littered with butts).

    I wouldn't miss the smokers.

    I wouldn't miss the tv or the badly dubbed films.

    I wouldn't miss the backwardness with so much technology.

    I wouldn't miss the impatience, perfectionism and inability to admit fault. At all.

     

    But I'm not going anywhere so it's all kind of moot.

     

     

    :) Great list!!

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  9. 2 hours ago, Habediehre said:

    Jeremytwo! Private school!? I'm a carpenter, not an investment banker!  They won't be going to private school don't worry! Thanks again for your input. 

    Regarding the Inlaw situation. We could live with the Inlaws for as long as we wish really. Probably rent free as well, till we get sorted and I find a job and pick up enough Bayerische/Deutsch to progress.

    So that's a massive help for us. Not many folk would have that stepping stone so we are lucky.

    Looking at it in my working class, rational mentality... In England we are content and comfortable. Our house although quite modest, will be paid off in about 5 years, I can earn around 35-40k a year comfortably without doing overtime. Do I as a father, want to risk this on moving to Bavaria, learn a new language and be out of my comfort zone etc for everything that Bavaria can give us. Mountains, clean air, lakes etc etc. 

    It's a tough one. The biggest thing that is killing us is that we feel torn between countries/friendships. We have drifted apart from friends here as a lot of them think we are going to move to Germany!!! 

    I suppose I should of foreseen this when I fell in love with a German girl 16 years ago!!!

    Once again I repeat people have a lot bigger problems in life, but though our problems are meaningless, it doesn't make them go away!!

    It's nice to speak to like minded people. Thanks for reading!

    2 hours ago, Habediehre said:

    Jeremytwo! Private school!? I'm a carpenter, not an investment banker!  They won't be going to private school don't worry! Thanks again for your input. 

    Regarding the Inlaw situation. We could live with the Inlaws for as long as we wish really. Probably rent free as well, till we get sorted and I find a job and pick up enough Bayerische/Deutsch to progress.

    So that's a massive help for us. Not many folk would have that stepping stone so we are lucky.

    Looking at it in my working class, rational mentality... In England we are content and comfortable. Our house although quite modest, will be paid off in about 5 years, I can earn around 35-40k a year comfortably without doing overtime. Do I as a father, want to risk this on moving to Bavaria, learn a new language and be out of my comfort zone etc for everything that Bavaria can give us. Mountains, clean air, lakes etc etc. 

    It's a tough one. The biggest thing that is killing us is that we feel torn between countries/friendships. We have drifted apart from friends here as a lot of them think we are going to move to Germany!!! 

    I suppose I should of foreseen this when I fell in love with a German girl 16 years ago!!!

    Once again I repeat people have a lot bigger problems in life, but though our problems are meaningless, it doesn't make them go away!!

    It's nice to speak to like minded people. Thanks for reading!

     

    ...i reckon you should probably have a think about the long term picture you have for your family's future - want you want long term for your kids....and then you can more easily put short term issues into perspective. Briefly, I moved from Melbourne to Bavaria (via Dortmund) cos I wanted something different(better) for my girls than I could provide in Oz. And to do so, I took stock of the long term goal and the various short to medium term issues that I could identify...there have been millions of surprises about living here in Germany, but none of these threaten the long term goal - so all is good. In any event, the decision "to jump" is always gonna be one with unknowns...and being able to deal with that is one of the things that separates us from those who stay in their home town or thereabouts their whole lives...good luck with your decision!

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  10. 3 minutes ago, jeremytwo said:

     

    Peter - I'm pretty much the same bloke in real life. I attempt to wind people up baed on the issue, not make personal attacks. The ad hominem, of which Alex is expert, is the tactic of a loser.

    I wasn't pointing any fingers...and a wind up is usually pretty easy to see. :)

     

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  11. the most annoying aspect of the internet for me is the lack of accountability in inter-personal communication....people using the relative anonymity afforded by chats/forums/etc (like this one (Toytown), for example) to speak to other people (who they don't know - or hardly know) in a way that is highly unlikely should they be standing face to face with that person. Whether its a random or calculated trolling, or an impulsive, emotional reaction, it is cowardice at least and plainly disrespectful and lazy at best...

    ...and it means that a high percentage of threads here, for example, descend into personal tit-for-tat nonsense...it seems amazing what a great moderating influence it is to have a person standing in front of you, oder... :)

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  12. My two cents worth: there's a heap of building going on...and foreign workers on the sites...in my area (Starnberg)...so the prospects of continued work just might be good. I hear a constant stream of hochdeutsch, bayerisch and serbo-croatian...but no English. Your kids will learn German super fast - just pop them into a Grundschule and kinder. Penzberg (south of Starners) has a sizeable pharma concern....so perhaps think of looking at southern Bavaria as a whole, rather than just Chiemsee area...unless the outlaws can provide housing, of course. Otherwise, same as everywhere else, you just gotta travel a bit for work. With a German wife, I imagine pretty much all the admin stuff will be as simple as it can be here in Germany...B):wacko:

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  13. 3 hours ago, Krieg said:

     

    Of course I have tons of criticism.   From the top of my head, I don't fully agree with the implementation of the Willkommenklasse and I really dislike that the white kid who just arrived to the country with poor or no German is thrown full time in the normal class, but the non-white kid is thrown full time in the Willkommenklasse.   I think it is bad in both cases and it is not correct.  I do not like the subjective evaluation in classes 1 and 2 and I would prefer grades from the beginning, I do not buy the "they are too young to face failure".   I don't agree that for certain university studies you must have an Abitur because they are not really "academic" career paths.   I don't like the way German (and English) classes are graded in Berlin in classes 3 to 6.   I don't like that social studies, history and geography were all packed in one single subject since a few years ago.   I really do not like that in some states parents can't opt the kids out of the religion class, at least I live in one where we can choose a non-religion alternative.   I don't like the approach in Math class teaching arithmetics in repeating cycles where they just increase the numbers by fold ten in each cycle and spend again lot of time repeating and repeating the same just with bigger numbers.

     

    And I could continue and continue.   I think there is no much talking about this here because normally there are just complaints from people who do not really have an idea and tons of criticizing who do not make sense at all.   Or stories about "This happened to my friend ... blah blah".   Of course, there is always going to be problems, no system is perfect, and there will be bad apples here and there.   But normally the hate here for the education system is very unfair.  And that the world is nowadays full of snowflakes could help a bit as well.

    On 8/24/2019, 3:59:07, Valerienellk said:

    My 5 and a half year old son is about to start German kindergarten. We’ve been here since June and he knows a small handful of words only. He’s a social guy who is pretty desperate to make friends and have a fulfilling life here so I’m wondering if any of you can share stories of your 5 or 6 (or older) year olds picking up German through kindergarten or early German schools. I’m a mom who has watched her child struggle all summer so any hopeful experiences will help!

    my girls, from Australia with no German language, went straight into Grundschule grades 2 and 3. They were conversing with everyone at 6 months and as fluent as german kids within one year. If you have a challenge ("IF"), it might be the issue that MikeMelga alluded to: there is a bit of a problem with the German school system...structurally and methodologically. It needs some serious reform. But at kindergarten, I think you just have to keep an eye on what behaviours are acceptable for the kids - and how the staff approach various issues with children. Overall, my experience says that you do not have to worry about whether your boy picks up the language.

     

    the word "hate" is being used in this thread far too frequently. It is quite apparent, I'm sorry to say, that there at least one advocate for the German school system in this thread who is being far too emotional about other people's opinions and/or experiences. Ordinarily, I stay out of this malarkey, but I have provided a negative response - and a caution - about my experiences (and disappointments) with the German school system in this thread and there is not a shred of "hate" in anything I have said. So to those who are reading  this thread, and might need to learn something from it, please take heed of the fact that one or two of us who are disappointed with the Grundschule system in particular (me) are not feeling any "hate" and would be more than happy to provide more constructive commentary if you think it might help.

    BTW, my family's experiences cover both the Ruhr (southern Dortmund) and Bavaria (Starnberg)...so too quite different places on the spectrum of German socio-economic circumstances...not a completely useless sample...perhaps.

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  14. On 8/24/2019, 3:59:07, Valerienellk said:

    My 5 and a half year old son is about to start German kindergarten. We’ve been here since June and he knows a small handful of words only. He’s a social guy who is pretty desperate to make friends and have a fulfilling life here so I’m wondering if any of you can share stories of your 5 or 6 (or older) year olds picking up German through kindergarten or early German schools. I’m a mom who has watched her child struggle all summer so any hopeful experiences will help!

    my girls, from Australia with no German language, went straight into Grundschule grades 2 and 3. They were conversing with everyone at 6 months and as fluent as german kids within one year. If you have a challenge ("IF"), it might be the issue that MikeMelga alluded to: there is a bit of a problem with the German school system...structurally and methodologically. It needs some serious reform. But at kindergarten, I think you just have to keep an eye on what behaviours are acceptable for the kids - and how the staff approach various issues with children. Overall, my experience says that you do not have to worry about whether your boy picks up the language.

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  15. Hi Firat,

    I was going to post a much longer, fuller post, but decided that it might be better to just offer the following.

    Firstly, the choice is not really about finding a "good" grundschule, but more about finding one that isn't "bad". Compared to the country I left, and those of many of my expat friends, the German Grundschule is an outstanding disappointment and an unwanted surprise about life in this fine land. It is characterised, comparatively, by a limited and unimaginative curriculum that is delivered by unfocused, poorly trained, unimaginative and uncommitted teachers. So you need to just find a nice neighbourhood (meaning one that is not populated by one-eyed, bigoted a***holes) and then pay close attention to the teachers and daily school life. And be prepared to engage with teachers who can't be bothered actually earning the moniker "educator" or understanding that belligerent, bullying behaviour is actually not acceptable.

    As for afternoon classes, you likely know already that this is usually the "Ganztagschule" aspect. The name "all day" is often a misnomer as it usually ends well before the end of the working day. But just ask the school to confirm that there is a place for your child. You may also find other options - which you have to pay for - which suit your circumstances.

     

    Hope this helps...although it is only one opinion so far....and generally speaking, the westerly side of Frankfurt is the nicer part....

    good luck with everything...

    Peter

     

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  16. 3 hours ago, neilandcaroline said:

    Anyone interested in British Girl Guiding might be interested to know about 1st Munich Rainbows / Brownies / Guides / Rangers. We meet on Tuesdays in Neubiberg and follow the new UK Girl guiding programme. We also go camping every year and hold district Fun days with the other Guiding units at MIS, BIS and Höhenkirchen-Siegertsbrunn.

    Here's the Girl Guide website https://1stmunichguides.weebly.com

    You can also register with any of our units here https://www.girlguiding.org.uk/information-for-parents/register-your-daughter/

     

    Thanks for the information !

    I wonder if you could answer a question: is the Starnberg location (MIS, yes?) fully operational for Scouts and Brownies? I can only seem to find/access 1st Munich group, with no direct access to the Starnberg group.

    I have a 7 and a 10 year old (from Australia) and we will be in Starnberg from late April.

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  17. Hi craig...small point, but your locator says Berlin. Anyway, I ride bikes and will be in Munich before summer starts, so put me on your list. I have a work colleague who is a local and also rides...so he knows a bit about the roads too...should be helpful. It will be my first full season in bavaria...so looking forward to some riding in summer. where you from?

    Peter

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  18. 9 hours ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

     

    German employment law (like almost all German law) is rarely a subject of major change with even minor changes taking far longer to enact than elephants do to procreate and being very well publicized during the process so the fact that many of the discussion posts on employment law in TT are old does not neccessarily imply that the information they contain is outdated.

     

     An easy way to find an English speaking lawyer who is a qualified specialist in German employment law is to use the following linked extended search (erweiterte Suche) tool whilst referring to the tips by number on the example screenshot below substituting in box 1 and box 4 the terms Arbeitsvertrag and Arbeitsrecht .

     

    5c0034aede2f2_ExtendedSuche-DeutscheAnwa

    Extended Search (for Lawyers in Germany) : DAV - German Lawyers Society

     

    The largest specialist employment law partnership in Germany (which maintains an excellent and comprehensive archive on all changes in German employment law as well as an A -Z on the subject and its case law - Kanzlei Hensche: Online Handbook on Labour Law (in Germany & in German)) has offices in all 16 Bundesländer so you may find several of their partners and/or associate lawyers in your search results.

     

    I also suggest you read carefully (irrespective of your financial situation but) apropos multiple general tips How to get legal advice or representation in court if you have limited means or a low income.

     

    2B

    nice one! :rolleyes:

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  19. Hi Freeboy,

     

    I don't have a direct line for you, but my experience as a lawyer in Australia means that I think you should be able to approach legal aid centres to ask if they have any recommendations for you. In addition to working as a corporate lawyer, I volunteered in legal advice centres after-hours, and we were always willing to assist people find the right legal help if we weren't able to provide it ourselves. The lawyers should be the same here...(although they may not be volunteers here...Germany is much wealthier). Either way, 1 minute of their time shouldn't hurt anyone.

     

    If you come up with nothing else, it might be worth trying as a short cut:

    https://www.studentenwerk-muenchen.de/en/our-advisory-network/legal-advice-service/legal-advice-in-munich/

     

    Also of course, you can try to contact a German government representative through here, as source of information:

    http://www.bamf.de/DE/Willkommen/ArbeitBeruf/Arbeitsrecht/arbeitsrecht-node.html

     

    hope this helps and yes, good luck.

     

    ...would be good if you could share what you learn eventually...

     

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  20. On 07/11/2018, 15:49:04, SerratedEdge said:

    I've been at Inlingua the last couple months, and really it's not as good as other language classes I've taken. Looking for your experiences/recommendations for a working professional hoping to pass a B1 test early next year. For now, my company is covering these costs completely. 

     

    I had a great experience with a VHS A2 class in another city a couple years ago, and I'm curious about the VHS teachers here. There's a B1/B2 class starting in Jan! And what about Edeltraud? I actually need German for work also (it's holding me back professionally), but my first goal is permanent residency. 

     

     

    HI Serrated Edge,

     

    I don't have a direct answer for your questions - but I didn't want to leave your query hanging.

    I have been in a similar situation to you. Learning German while working pretty hard at something else. It is tiring for sure, and a test of patience, perseverance and sanity. :)

    I did not do classes myself - cos I tried that back in Oz and the pace was too slow.

    Instead, I established where I was at (thru online placement test) and then set up my own connections/systems.

    In my case, i needed to get from a self-taught A2 to a pass on B1 as quickly as possible.

    So I found a number of books (millions out there) but very importantly, a book specifically focussed on training for the Goethe B1. I then hooked up with a good language teacher and explained what  i was trying to do, and went from there. Being on skype is not ideal, but it does work.

     

    Along the way, due to my workload and work activities, I extended the original target timeline a LOT, and found myself too tired for many conversation lessons...so planning lessons to minimise postponements was a big part of my life :)

     

    For me, it worked (passed the B1). Unfortunately, I run an english language project, so I do not have the benefit of being forced to speak German everyday, in the way daughters have been at school.. (they are totally up to speed in German...lucky them!)

     

    I can provide the B1 practice book name if you like and can recommend an exceptional German teacher in italki. she is awesome!

     

    ...hope this helps with your learning decisions.

    Peter

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  21. 3 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

     

    My child is in 3. Klasse Grundschule, here in SH.

    Both my wife and I are schocked how easy, leisure, relaxed and stress-free, her overall school-life is. Workload and expectations seem to us to be extremely modest. All the non-German colleagues with whom I spoke share this view, whereas the German colleagues with whom I discussed this don't.

    yes, I have 2 daughters in Grundschule and it is an absolute breeze. They are spending their time learning German and variously being bored or slightly challenged by Maths. Otherwise, the other childrens' behaviour is a worry too...lots of bullying and lack of respect. Both girls looking forward to a change of pace - back to active, challenging learning. 

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  22. Hi Larissa3,

    It will be a couple of months before we are in Munich (currently we live a little further north), but I have 2 daughters who would be interested in trying tap (ages 7 and 9). They currently do Modern/Jazz or something similar...with a less than great teacher.

    ...so that's 2 to keep in mind..

     

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