mtbiking

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About mtbiking

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  • Location Munich
  • Nationality Portugal
  • Gender Male
  • Year of birth 1979

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  1. I didn’t know he is 80, in that case I take it back. My own father is 70 and tendentially easier to confuse.
  2. Jeba, you keep saying you’re German while at the same time showing an inability to search and understand simple concepts. What you just said has marginally to do with December’s law taxing options, etc https://www.welt.de/finanzen/article205127736/Einkommensteuergesetz-Aenderung-mit-absurden-Folgen-fuer-Sparer.html   and nothing with the question.  So if you want to do the guy a favor translate the following text from test.de, 05.2019:   Teilfrei­stel­lungen entlasten Anleger Als Ausgleich für geringere Erträge hält das Investment­steuerreformgesetz für Anleger eine Entschädigung bereit. Sie müssen nicht mehr für die gesamten Erträge Abgeltung­steuer abführen, sondern nur noch auf einen Teil. Die Höhe dieser Teilfrei­stellung hängt von der Fonds­art ab: Bei einem Fonds, der fort­laufend mehr als 50 Prozent in Aktien anlegt, bekommt der Privat­anleger 30 Prozent der Ausschüttungen steuerfrei. Bei einem Misch­fonds mit wenigs­tens 25 Prozent Aktien­anteil sind es 15 Prozent. Besitzer von Immobilienfonds­anteilen bekommen eine Frei­stellung von 60 Prozent. Investiert der Fonds vor allem in ausländische Immobilien (zu mindestens 51 Prozent), sind sogar 80 Prozent steuerfrei. Die Teilfrei­stel­lungen gelten für alle Erträge, also Dividenden und Verkaufs­gewinne – egal ob inländisch oder ausländisch. Gleich­zeitig ersetzt die neue Methode die Anrechnung der im Ausland gezahlten ausländischen Quellen­steuern im Rahmen der Steuererklärung. Für viele Anleger erübrigt sich so eine Menge Papierkrieg.   https://www.test.de/Fondsbesteuerung-ab-2018-Das-muessen-Sie-ueber-die-Fondssteuer-wissen-5124267-0/
  3. Climate change

    It’s all a matter of implementation. A larger than life 2D video or hologram plus as you said what people would infer from it can be a big hit. Inking distance f2f meetings must in general die. If the technology is not immersive enough to replace them most times than it must be improved.
  4. Climate change

      yeah, she has my fundamental support, but I’d tell her what I tell my colleagues often: we travel too much and God gave us Videoconferencing for a reason.   hell, she commands a lot of resources nowadays. Push through a VR appearance. If technology can resurrect dead pop stars it can send her and us virtually around the globe as well. Right now it’s a matter of implementation.
  5. Money I know I’ll need in less than two years I’d never invest, unless in amounts I  know I’ll be able to recoup in time or if you are flexible to postpone or cancel the purchase. Even if no major crisis  hits in the meantime, you’ll be jumping at shadows.
  6. Finding a truly quiet apartment around Munich

    S7 to the south? Try an area adjacent to a park or forest in Ottobrunn or Neubiberg. Much quieter than Munich and no farm noises, and you still have every you may need close by - no car necessary. It’s not cheaper than Munich, though. 
  7. Berlin to get a Tesla Gigafactory

    Some people have too much time in their hands. Besides in Germany there are (of course) laws regulating how a private individual or company has to compensate the cutting down of a tree or forest by replanting the equivalent. 
  8. Berlin to get a Tesla Gigafactory

      not anymore. Nowadays for new installations you get paid a measly 9ct KWh. It makes sense you consume as much as you can and gat a battery of adequate size. We had an energy advisor visiting (the Amt pays most of the cost) and his recommendation was to cover the roof, buy a small battery for the house and a big battery in the form of an electric car. Selling doesn’t pay off in Germany at 9 ct when you buy at almost 30 ct.
  9. Berlin to get a Tesla Gigafactory

    the price of food at a normal restaurant is limited by the fact that you can cheaply cook it at home, though. It would be far higher otherwise in our wonderful capitalist societies. Drinkable beer at home on the other hand is already too much of a challenge for me 😒   what Germany can easily do is tax the electricity you produce for your own use. They already do it (tax your own usage) if you’re selling the remaining into the net.
  10.   Yeah, as it happens I’m currently transferring my portfolio to Onvista from Flatex. And I know I’m not the only one. Bye bye losers.   It sucks Onvista won’t take you. According to the last available data from Test.de (2019) the second best option you have now is DKB. For their example of large portfolio €150,000, 15 positions and 4 orders per year the cost is €74 for DKB (€28 for Onvista).  
  11. real estate

      Growth hasn't until recently been detached from reality, or it was but the other way around. In Germany prices were depressed for at least a decade and very few other than locals and professionals were buying even with ever higher available income (it wasn't fashionable or a hot market -> herd behaviour). As a result there was no fall in prices to be had when the global crisis hit in 2005-2008, and the correction (upwards) came with the global recovery plus cheap money.  Now the herd has been buying whatever crap is to be found in Germany and driving the prices ever higher. It has all been seen before, but my point is that prices won't fall to what they were in 2010.   for the young and the ones with a short attention span:   https://www.theguardian.com/money/2011/mar/19/brits-buy-germans-rent *   *Note that their example of a possible purchase wasn't well chosen. €400,000 bought you a small but nice DHH or RMH in somewhere like Ramersforf or Giesing in 2010, or a nice 80-90 sqm apartment in Bogenhausen. Enough for a family. I still have my old Datasheet as proof.    
  12. real estate

    And another one to put things a bit in an international perspective.    
  13. real estate

    Since it's a slow morning and I have all this data to play with (I love German efficiency), here's another correlation:          
  14. real estate

      I've just plotted for us the Real Estate Index for Munich, 1975-2018.  That stagnation between 1995-2010? That's the reason why I bought in 2010 - it was cheap back then. People were renting because of flexiblity, tradition, high initial costs, whatever. One argument that you can still find in TT was: the prices are stagnant since 20 years, it's a lousy investment. In Germany you rent. This in one of the wealthiest and most attractive to live in major cities in the World. We were due for a price correction.   Now, I'm of the opinion that the price correction has overheated and that the prices will swing down. But it will take a lot of economic damage to make real estate in München so cheap as it was in 2010, i.e in 1995.    
  15. real estate

      Lots of people don't want to buy in Munich or elsewhere for several reasons. This is as much true now as it was 10 or 20 years ago. Others are willing to risk it and invest their time and resources. That said, my Mietern are happy to rent from a a "small fish" private landlord instead of a big company.