Six weeks annual vacation time - Germany

Is it too much?

Pages: 1 2 3 4

nataras
Today I was discussing during lunch with my German collleagues about the 6 weeks Holiday which every employee is eligible in Germany. They were very curious to know about the holidays back in Asia. In Asia mostly across all countries 3 weeks is maximum which a person is eligible for holiday during a year. This is excluding the 10-12 public holidays. After coming to Germany I realized there are 6 weeks of holiday for vacation, 14 public holidays (2007 Calendar year) and if a person is sick these are not counted as holidays. So out of 12 months roughly 2 months are holidays. I dont know about the US but my friends who work told me about the maximum of 3 weeks in a year + additonal public holidays. I think the number of holidays are too many in Germany or is it common across Europe?
ThePigsInBlankets
In what warped frame of mind could any number of holidays possible be too many?
yanksavage
nataras, take what you can get!! 6 weeks is great. To answer the question though, I think Germany's economy would be stronger (or even stronger) if they cut back on vacation time. What do you think?
Welsh man
well too many I doubt or would you turn down the offer to get 6 weeks holiday? . It also depends on how old one is and how long one has been working for the company. It is not generally 6 weeks and varies as already mentioned.
bluedave
I think the number of holidays are too many in Germany
Errm, sod off!! Are you mad??

In the nicest possible way of course.
Dafydd
I think the number of holidays are too many in Germany or is it common across Europe?
Fuck off.

In the nicest possible way of course
Dafydd
@ BD. Wow that was spooky. Although clearly you are more restrained than me!
barbett
I think the number of holidays are too many in Germany or is it common across Europe?
Same in Italy and, as far as I know, also France.
In Ireland it's about 4 weeks, if memory helps

To answer the question though, I think Germany's economy would be stronger (or even stronger) if they cut back on vacation time. What do you think?
Jain
People on vacation create good business for tourism, for example. Also, one could argue that if people are well rested and recharged from the holiday they are more productive when they go back to work.
LauKatOD
Actually, stateside 3 weeks would not be a maximum. Technically there is no legal requirement to give any, 2 is average, and alot of larger companies would work on an accrual basis.
SleeplessInMunich
Depends on your outlook on life. Frankly I don't want to live just to work and prefer to have as much time free as possible.
Welsh man
I work to enable me to live. Wow that just sounded really good
nataras
@ yanksavage. I think the holiday has got nothing much to do with economy.
@ barbett. I agree with his point. It creates good business for Tourism. Regarding the point of rested. It is just psychological and does not matter in my view point...
Dafydd
Is this a wind up?
nataras
well, not yet!!
Lorelei
In Asia mostly across all countries 3 weeks is maximum which a person is eligible for holiday during a year. This is excluding the 10-12 public holidays.
But do people in some Asian countries actually get the holiday they're eligible for?

Xinhua News Agency:

China's workers who are putting in long hours of unpaid overtime or being required to work through the coming week-long holiday are starting to wonder if their bosses have forgotten what May Day commemorates.
http://www.china.org.cn/english/2006/May/167390.htm

"Workers from one factory reported being paid only 10 cents above their standard wage for five-hour overtime shifts," said the group's report, adding that "in another factory, employees regularly work 16 hours, seven days a week."

"Workers in a third factory couldn't afford to go home for the Chinese New Year holiday because they had not been paid for three months," said the report.
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article...RTICLE_ID=25567
Pages: 1 2 3 4
TT Logo
You are viewing a low fidelity version of this page. Click to view the full page.