Houses in Germany

Details/descriptions of the typical German house

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Wolf32
A weird topic, but what is the typical house like in Germany? Please provide details and differences from the houses in America or the UK. For example, the windows can open sideways or be pulled down to let the top be open.
Wolf32
Another thing I've noticed are the locks with keys for every door instead of the lock with the push-in tab or twist lock. They also seem to have more doors.
arsenal21
I think windows are generally smaller.
BetzeAmi
Don't know much about UK homes but differences between Germany and the US are:

No 2x4 framing - walls (including interior walls)are concrete cinder block finished with stucco.
Floors are reinforced concrete slabs so wi-fi can be problematic in a multistory dwelling. Also loads of fun if you have to mount a light fixture or ceiling fan.
No ducted heating system - it's either radiators in the rooms or floor heating.
Roof is made of interlocking heavy clay/ceramic tiles vs asphalt shingles.
No round doorknobs.
Kitchens are generally smaller in Germany.
The infamous "poo shelf" toilets in older houses.
arunadasi
I can only compare with England.

Most houses have cellars, old ones as well as new-builds.

Germans who want new-builds buy a plot and build it themselves, either from a prefab company or brick by brick (the prefabs are very good btw; they can be designed to your own taste). New-build house developments as occur in the UK are unheard of here.

Windows open inwards, as opposed to outwards in the UK. This is mostly to facilitate cleaning; in the UK you need to hire a window-cleaner for outside upstairs windows.

Germans like to place bedrooms up in the eaves, even though this gives some of the rooms slanting roofs. In the UK, this is usually just attic space.

Washing machines and dryers are usually in the bathroom or cellar. You won't find a washing machine in UK bathrooms; I think it's something to do with electricity, which is also why you usually have pull-strings for lights in the UK, and no ordinary sockets. UK washing machines are usually in the kitchen.

Very few carpets in German homes, and they are becoming fewer and fewer. Germans prefer tiled or wooden/laminate floors. Brits love carpets.

You'll hardly ever find a fireplace in a German house, not even in an old one. These use wood-burning stoves made of iron, or else a Kachelofen (don't know what that is in German --help me please!)

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Germans like to display their names -- often full names, with names of their children as well! On their doors and doorways. In Britain, you won't find any name on the doorbell at all.

Rolläden! Germans love them on every window and glass door, and some people close up the entire house at night so that it's pitch dark in the morning. They also love their Gardinen (net curtains) so that the curious can't see in.

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arunadasi
asphalt
Asphalt? Really? People are pulling out asphalt right left and centre here and in the UK.
SpiderPig
A toilet just inside the front door so that your place stinks of shite when you get guests!
arunadasi
I had one of those -- in a new build in Eastbourne!
emkay
Asphalt? Really? People are pulling out asphalt right left and centre here and in the UK.
Are you thinking of asbestos? I think asphalt roof tiles are more normal in the US
arunadasi
Ach yes. It's asbestos I was thinking of. Senior moment there!
emkay
I have them all the time

Another thing I've noticed, when there are new build areas available, there seems to be little by way of planning restriction. As everyone builds their own house, the overall look of the site is often unsightly with 1.5 floor houses crushed between 4 floor houses. We've seen plots where the distance between the houses is less than the 2 'meters we thought I was supposed to be. There are numerous semi detached houses where only one half is built where the owners have no idea if or when the other half will be built. In other semis, one half doesn't resemble the other at all...even differing roof lines - not in an attractive way.

In the uk, a building firm is more likely to acquire a building site, design and plan different style coordinating houses and then sell the finished house.
Wolf32
Has anyone else noticed that they don't normally use sheets under their comforters?
arunadasi
A comforter -- is that a duvet? If so, they use use a duvet cover -- you don't need a sheet. Otherwise -- what's a comforter?
Tap
This question now is more about personal habits rather than the differences in houses, a separate issue, I think.

I believe a comforter in the US is similar to a duvet in the UK and a Bettdecke here in Germany, which have covers, so don't need a sheet.
BetzeAmi
Forgot another. Built-in clothes closets in bedrooms are almost unknown in Germany.

And yes, I did mean asphalt shingles. Thin, flexible and usually have small decorative grains of clay or similar substance on the surface.Attached image
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