Catholic schools in Germany

Should we send our kids to one, are they better?

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paulbromley
Hi all

My German girlfriend is expecting our first child and we arehaving some strong arguments about one topic in particular.

She was 'born catholic' but isn't active in the church community. I was born naked and screaming and think that the catholic church is a rather vile and corrupt organisation which uses fear to spread lies and is a damaging influence on the minds of young people. Rather strong views but as an atheist I'm allowed to think what I like without the celestial thought police damning me.

My girlfriend wants our child christened, I would like it to be able to grow up and make its own mind up but I feel she is trying to guilt me into it by saying that if it's catholic then it will have access to much better schools and jobs.

I only want to do what is best for my child so can someone let me know if this is the case that:

[list=1]
  • Catholic schools are significantly better than non denominational schools,
  • Catholic schools are allowed to exclude non catholics
  • German law allows discrimination based upon religion


    Thanks
  • kato
    Catholic schools are significantly better than non denominational schools

    Nah, they're run-of-the-mill bog standard schools.

    Catholic schools are allowed to exclude non catholics

    Depends on the state, but in some states yes - and no, not the conservative south (which abolished confessional public schools in the 60s), the problematic area is in particular NRW. Where's the girlfriend from?

    German law allows discrimination based upon religion

    Regarding jobs? Only if you want to work for the church or an organization that operates as part of a church (Caritas for Catholics).
    westvan
    she is trying to guilt me into it by saying that if it's catholic then it will have access to much better schools and jobs.
    Where in the world did she get that idea?
    nina_glyndwr
    1. My Catholic god-daughter goes to a Catholic school. I think her Catholic mother only christened her so she could get into a good school. (Rather hypocritical as the mother has told me she doesn't believe in God.)

    2. No, they are not allowed to exclude non-Catholics. Not according to my god-daughter when I asked her.

    3. No, it doesn't but some companies will have a token non-Catholic. The god-daughter's mum used to work for C&A in the admin department. The owners are Catholics and they give preference to Catholics. They had one non-Catholic in the admin to prove they weren't discriminating against people of other religions. As to the shop staff.. no idea. I don't think so. But the people on the higher level, yes, they did want them to be Catholic. Whether this has changed in the last 15 years, I don't know. But this was the case when the god-daughter's mum was there.
    kato
    2. No, they are not allowed to exclude non-Catholics. Not according to my god-daughter when I asked her.
    It depends, for schools in NRW and Lower Saxony. There's both "open" confessional schools (that take anyone) and "closed" confessional schools in those two states.
    camlough
    as an atheist I'm allowed to think what I like without the celestial thought police damning me.
    And as a Catholic, your girlfriend has a perfect right to believe something else. I must say, that sentence sound pretty damn arrogant to me.

    I went to a Catholic school and we had Protestants both as pupils and Teachers.

    You wont get a better job because you went to a Catholic school, that is pure shite.

    I dont really see the problem, let the child be christenend, it will decided for itself later on anyhow, no matter what you may raise it with.

    If the child wants to be christian later in life, then that is his or her decision. Just because you are an Atheist doesnt mean everybody else has to be either.
    anne k
    I would like it to be able to grow up and make its own mind up
    I don't think you get any more choice if you are kept away from the church as a child. I was brought up by an atheist, never went to church, never knew anything about religion, so when I got to an age at which I was curious about religion I felt too embarrassed to go to a church on my own. I was quite sorry that my mother never took me there.

    I only want to do what is best for my child
    Don't we all.
    HEM
    We live in Southern Schleswig-Holstein...

    Neither of our two children have been christened. Both went to a catholic Kindergarten. At school both did "Religeon Unterricht" - both got pretty good grades.

    AFAIK neither has intention of joining a church & paying additional part of their future income. They also have no time for church etc (daughter rides, son flies; both studying).

    So the response to your GF's apparent statements is : Not True.
    DDBug
    If your girlfriend is really that worried about being Catholic, then she should be more worried about the out of wedlock conception than potential future employment of said non-Catholically conceived child.

    Hypocrisy. Applying only the convenient bits of Catholicism* for 2000 years.

    * Catholicism/Mormonism/Christianity/Buddhism/Communism/Libertarianism etc. etc. etc.
    HEM
    Well said
    Hans321
    [list=1]
  • Catholic schools are significantly better than non denominational schools,
  • Catholic schools are allowed to exclude non catholics
  • German law allows discrimination based upon religion

  • There are some good Catholic schools.

    I don't know how the situation is today, but 20 years ago in NRW they weren't allowed to take only Catholics. But they could exclude people who didn't belong to a religious group, i.e. atheists.
    Elfenstar
    ...My girlfriend wants our child christened, I would like it to be able to grow up and make its own mind up but I feel she is trying to guilt me into it by saying that if it's catholic then it will have access to much better schools and jobs....
    my bf, who is protestant, and i had these serious talks towards the beginning of our relationship and i am glad we did. i was raised a christian, perhaps not even baptized by my catholic-raised parents, but i went to sunday school, then different non-denominational churches until i left home for college and gave up religion altogether. i will raise my child not in a per-se christian way, but in a morally responsible way and this will probably encompass many teachings of world religions. the study of jesus christ will be one of them. but i will not allow my child to be baptized and i cannot allow him to go through such a ceremony with me standing by the wayside, accepting that we will raise that child according to protestant beliefs. that would make me a hypocrite and i refused, gently, to allow that. he accepts it, is saddened by it, but accepts it. and if he wants to start going to church and our child one day says "i want to be baptized too", then i will not disallow it.

    ...
    If your girlfriend is really that worried about being Catholic, then she should be more worried about the out of wedlock conception than potential future employment of said non-Catholically conceived child. ...
    amen! as a child, i was so fearful that god would punish me (catholic thinking), that after i prayed, i was really afraid i would not wake up. the baptist church my dad and step-mom went to (pre-teen years) was't any better (black baptist churches) cause we were expected to be seen and not heard, yet spend 3 hours in church and not doze off! i got chastised once for wearing my best trousers to church. the pastor got up and preached about it, and pointed me out. i hated that place afterwards. no wonder. then i dabbled in Mormonism cause of my first true love, then just gave up entirely.

    I'm a spiritual person and do believe in something, but i honestly do not believe one religion is better than the other. i may be addressing "god", but that's just a term in my eyes.
    desdemona
    our baby goes to a catholic kindergarten in bonn. the kindergarten accepts non-catholics too, as we saw some turkish kids there (turkish should either be muslim or orthodox, no?). from my kindergarten research, i did find out that the catholic ones are much nicer than the non-catholic ones (better infrastructure, more teachers, etc.). but i guess it's more to do with funding than anything else. tthe kindergartens probably also get funding from the church in addition to the state funding, thus the better infrastructure.
    poppet
    As someone who was unfortunate enough to be sent to a Jesuit (= catholic + even more brainwashing) school (St. Aloysius in Glasgow) I would never dream of send my son to such an institution. 4 of my siblings who also went there agree. Not a chance.
    yomintyfresh
    I spent my year as a language assistant at a private Catholic girls' school in Rheinland-Pfalz.

    Employees and students alike were not required to be Catholic; my closest friend on staff was an atheist. Students had the choice of taking Protestant religion classes (taught by a Protestant man who was very popular amongst the students), Catholic religion classes (taught by a very nice Catholic woman who was really open and interested in learning about all religions), or general ethics. If not for the crucifixes in every room, I wouldn't have been able to tell it apart from any other school. It seemed like most of the students who picked this particular Gymnasium picked it not because they were religious, but because they were going through a "boys are icky" phase when it came time for them to pick a Gymnasium (but for the most part, that had changed by the time they were 16).

    There didn't seem to be any benefits to attending this Gymnasium as opposed to the regular one, but later, after I started teaching at the university level, I had some students who had attended a different private Catholic girls' school in the same area. From their descriptions, the other school sounded like it was better organized, and students did charity work.
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