Too much cayenne pepper in meal

What can I do?

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nina_glyndwr
I've made some vegetarian chilli - only instead of chilli.. I put in cayenne pepper this time. And I put too much of the stuff in. It's quite strong .. but the thing is.. my German aunt will eat this for lunch tomorrow. And you know what Germans are like when it comes to non-bland food.

I read somewhere online that you can counteract this with lemon so I put some good squirts of lemon juice into the concoction. I'm eating a portion now and the lemon juice does not seem to have made much difference.

Should I put more lemon juice in? I've got red bell peppers, zucchini, kidney beans, tomatoes and onions in this. And as I couldn't find an aubergine/eggplant, I put leeks in instead.

What should I do to take some of the fire out of it?

Thanks.
PandaMunich
Another tin of tomatoes.
lilplatinum
Sour cream?
westvan
Yep, all you can really do is stretch it with more ingredients, I don't think that there's anything that would neutralize the pepper. Can you make up another batch of chili with no spices and mix the two together?
gail123
Some people say that adding a bit of sugar (not to taste it) and canned corn will help. But if it's a person who need sreally bland, even doubling the tomatoes may not help. I'd go with westvan's advice in that case.
jaycool
Sour cream?
That's the correct answer. Chilis are fat-soluble and not water-soluble and the fat in the milk product will do it for you.
Keydeck
Lemon to counteract the pepper, some sugar to moderate the bitterness of the lemon. Sorted. You said you put a few squirts in, try half a lemon.
westvan
This sound really weird, but I was also thinking that you could also put it all in a sieve and rinse most of the liquid away, just leaving the vegetable and beans and then adding more tomatoes and whatever spices you wanted.
nina_glyndwr
Blimey... so many replies so quickly. Thanks.
redlawrey
You can also put a whole, raw, peeled potato in whilst you cook it and it can absorb some of the spice...then just remove the potato when you serve it.
Moonboot
how about putting a spud in to absorb some of the spiciness, then remove it once it has been boiling there for a bit and before it breaks up and disperses the spiciness again.
I did this for a chili con carne that we had oversalted and it worked.

edit: great minds think alike
DanHessen
Is she rich?
nina_glyndwr
She's comfortably well off (her being a miser). But what that has got to do with too much cayenne pepper, I have no idea.

The thing is .. if I put say a spud into it, an boil it, the whole thing will turn into a mush. It simmered for 45 minutes already.
Moonboot
a whole big spud, and take it out after ten mins or so whilst it's still solid.
worked a treat for us.
jaycool
The thing is .. if I put say a spud into it, an boil it, the whole thing will turn into a mush. It simmered for 45 minutes already.
I don't know whether the potato thing will work or not, as I've never tried it, but you can certainly simmer a chili for much longer than 45 minutes without it turning to mush. I simmer mine (on extremely low heat) for a minimum of 1 to 1.5 hours.
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