Brand name differences between countries - Germany

Same product - different name

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Demi
Why do companies have the same products in different countries but call them by different names? For example, in American the household cleaner Mr. Clean is called Mr. Proper here in Germany. Dawn dishwashing liquid is called Fairy. Carl's Jr is Hardee's in England. Johnson & Johnson is Penaten. And I think Sure deodorant is called Rexona but not sure. It's so frustrating when looking for my favorite things and can't find them only to find out they are called something else. Okay, the major things have the same name (Nike, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Adidas, etc.) but it's the little things that count. Does anyone have a website or a list of the product name changes? Any other products you have come across with different names? This would be helpful.
eurobabs
Then there is always the Mars bar here (and in UK) which we call a Milky way bar back home. I think they (or we) just do it to confuse the other
interplanetjanet
In some parts of Australia, Burger King is called Hungry Jack's, though in other parts it's called Burger King.
Rahul
lagenese ( if I spelt that right) Ice cream is called ' kwality walls ' in Inida. It has the same logo at both places.
UrbanAngel
Langnese is also Walls in the UK too.

Also, Walker's crisps are called Lay's in the US. You can get both types here in specialised shops.

Yes, Sure deodorant is Rexona here.
Johnny English
Appropriate brands:

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Uncle Jamal
Why do companies have the same products in different countries but call them by different names?  For example, in American the household cleaner Mr. Clean is called Mr. Proper here in Germany.  Dawn dishwashing liquid is called Fairy.  Carl's Jr is Hardee's in England.  Johnson & Johnson is Penaten.  And I think Sure deodorant is called Rexona but not sure.  It's so frustrating when looking for my favorite things and can't find them only to find out they are called something else.  Okay, the major things have the same name (Nike, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Adidas, etc.) but it's the little things that count.  Does anyone have a website or a list of the product name changes?  Any other products you have come across with different names?  This would be helpful.
How annoying, yes. Long live globalisation and the homogenisation of all brand names.
YorkshireLad6
Many household products are distributed under varying names by the Proctor & Gamble conglomerate - see here for a worldwide list of their products.

Identical products share different names in different geographies for marketing reasons. Some names don't work well in some geographies or languages, maybe have negative implications or meanings, or simply have local competition with similar names. I recall in some markets "Fairy" became "Dawn" but lost market share and reverted to "Fairy" again...

YL6
Showem
Yeah, Rolls Royces are nice cars, but nobody in Germany wanted to be driven around in a "Silver Mist".
Propellor Head
The Snickers bar will forever be called Marathon to some.
Blitz
@Demi - I am guessing that you are probably from Cali or somewhere in the western part of the US. Just because I noticed the Carls Jr thing and it is not limited to Europe. In Kansas it is called Hardees and when I went to CA I noticed it was called Carls Jr. just an observation that I thought was interesting.
Demi
I am from Cali and haven't been to Kansas, yet. Is Jack-in-the-box called something else there too? What about Taco Bell? Why do the companies do this? It's so damn frustrating! Aldi is called something else in Austria too but the logo is the same. It's weird. I think they would save money if they left the names alone.
YorkshireLad6
Why do the companies do this? 
I think I answered this above. It's clear, and sensible, much though you may not like it. Showem's example was a perfect example of naming issues that arise...
Keydeck
Or Vauxhall in the UK which is Holden in Australia and Opel pretty much everywhere else. Or the Mitsubishi Pajero which is the Mitsubishi Montero in Spain and I think Mitsubishi Shogun in the UK.

It's fairly self-evident that one would choose a name that the marketting bods think suits the particular market as has already been mentioned. I see it as amusing rather than annoying.
RNAiNY
the chevy NOVA that was sold in the US ...would definitely need to change its name..when sold to the latin countries. As NOVA in spanish sounds like NO VA which means NO GO

or the Audi a4, when sold in the chinese speaking countries, the name will be change as in Fukinese/taiwanese it sounds like "WILL DIE"

good luck driving those cars!
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