Weak and strong verbs - Germany

Language foibles


hallie132
Hey,

Does anyone know if there is a for sure (with the exception of some irregulars, of course) way of telling whether a verb is weak or strong? Additionally, when conjugating verbs with a separable prefix into the present perfect, how can the correct ending, be it 't' or 'en', be determined?

Thanks!!
BadDoggie
No. Strong vs. weak is something that you have to learn on an individual basis for all languages with Germanic roots, although you can get a feel for which verbs are more likely to be strong (spelling or usage) once you have a decent grasp of the basics.

woof.
drw
Does anyone know if there is a for sure (with the exception of some irregulars, of course) way of telling whether a verb is weak or strong?
Like BadDoggie said, you ultimately have to memorize for each verb whether it is weak or strong. However, if the related English verb is irregular (go/gehen, bring/bringen), the German verb is usually also strong.

Also, at least in English, the strong verbs tend to be ones that are used often.

But in the end, knowing that a verb is strong is not enough - you've got to memorize the conjugation.
Additionally, when conjugating verbs with a separable prefix into the present perfect, how can the correct ending, be it 't' or 'en', be determined?
I think that the conjugated endings of separable verbs are always the same as those for the base verb.
Nicky
A rough guide, and very rough - if a verb is irregular in English then it probably is in German too. drink - drank/trank eat ate/ass see/saw/sah etc. Must be a lot more. sleep - slept/schlief Get yourself one of those wheels to play with on the train.
Moonboot
right, I'm rubbish at analysing English language ins and outs...and someone at work just asked me which is the British spelling of this word:

Organization or Organisation,

s or z???

can someone advise?
thanks loads, Jo.
Kza
s for british english and z for american
Moonboot
ta Kza will go and tell him and pretend I knew all along!
Kay
@Moonboot
If the word itself is part of the name of an organisation/organization, better not to tinker with it: for example,
the OECD is definitely "Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development" but UN agencies take a "z"
(WHO=World Health Organization, ILO=International Labour Organization, etc.).

Similarly, even if you're using British spelling (in a report or whatever) you'd have to write "US Labor Department",
for ex., because that happens to be its correct name.
mickeyreiss
Use http://canoo.net which has all German grammar you can ever imagine. Even in English.
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