Installing a UK electric oven/cooker in Germany

How to? special electrician?

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majorlee
Hi

we have recently been given a new oven and i will be taking it back to Germany with me

i know that UK and German electrics are different, UK on one phase and German on three phase

what i want to know before i bring it over is that it is possible for an electrician to install it for us, as i am going no-where near a 3 phase as one mistake and ur dead!

any electricians here or anyone know of a good one how could help in southwest germany??

we did search for a cooker in Germany, but the range was poor and price almost twice and build looked awful for all the stand alones

ty for the help in advance
Malcolm Spudbury
Contact one of the building services listed in the business directory. They should be able to tell you if it's possible.

If it is possible, the actual installation would need to be done by an approved/certified electrician.

I used Benchmark (listed in the link above) to fit my kitchen when I moved house. They brought in a local electrician to do the oven installation.
PeterN
In the UK the electric cooker circuit uses a dedicated cable back to the distribution panel. The wire itself has a larger diameter to handle the current that the cooker needs. British houses are built with that larger diameter cable installed and a higher current breaker for that circuit - typically 30A.

From what I have seen, here the cookers are wired through three smaller diameter cables, each on a different phase and (in my house) on a separate 16A breaker.

Connecting a UK cooker to one of the three phases in a German house wouldn't be a good idea. The cooker might operate at low power but once you draw more than 16A the breaker will trip. I wouldn't recommend increasing the breaker rating because the breaker is protecting the smaller diameter cables built into the walls of the building. You'd need to install a UK style 30A cooker circuit all the way back to the distribution panel to be able to run the cooker at full power.

You really need the right cooker for the circuit already installed in the building.
kato
One solution would be to take apart the cooker to separate the power supply of oven and stove tops, and hook them up separately with a standard 220V 16A power supply each, if either appliance is below 3 kW peak (likely). Work for an electrician.
tech71
I recently bought a stove/oven combo here in Germany. There were at least 4 different ways to wire it depending upon the mains supply.In other words,it's compatible with most(probably all) electrical systems found here. I would imagine yours has the same capability. Do you have the paperwork for it? There would be a wiring diagram. There should also be a wiring diagram attached to the back of the unit.
majorlee
i will try and find out when i get back to the UK next week

i was thinking of seperating the power loads also, will have a chat with my leccy in the UK too
jeremyhay
It's an extremely bad idea to bring a UK electric stove to Germany.
German electric stoves are three phase.
UK single phase.
The reasons are historic - three phase systems use less copper.

Yes, you can wire a UK electric stove to one of the phases
but if you try to run the oven and 4 hotplates you will cause the fuse
to trip.
You only have 1/3 of the current available compared to a 3 phase stove.
And as for the person who suggested separating the cabling within the
electric stove - the potential between the phases is around 415 volts -
how do you know the stove is insulated to this standard?
The manufacturer would veto the idea in short order. 3 phase is not to be
messed around with. UK domestic wiring is single phase (almost without exception)
for safety reasons.
zoinks208
A sneaky way around the issue is to replace the breaker with a single phase 32A and pair up the existing wires (L1-L2 N-L3).

Its not illegal to run a red light if you don't get caught.
ThomasSS
Its not illegal to run a red light if you don't get caught.
Blindly running a red light probably won't cause an accident. Ignoring electrical codes probably won't burn your house down. But lets keep in mind that both laws exist for a reason, and part of that reason is your own safety.
Kuzzer
Its not illegal to run a red light if you don't get caught.
At the risk of going waaaaay off topic here, sorry to shatter your dreams but it is in fact illegal to run a red light, even if you don't get caught. You don't get punished, sure - but it's still illegal. And you need an apostrophe in "it's", BTW.

Moving on, this thread has depressed me immeasurably. About a month before our unexpected move to Germany, our UK house had been completely renovated, with a full-on Neff applianced-kitchen installed. I wasn't going to let tenants loose on my brand new Series 6 Oven and top-of-the-range Multifunction Oven, so I put these into storage in the hope of bringing them over if and when we needed to fit a kitchen over here. Arse. The stuff one learns on TT...



K
PeterN
A sneaky way around the issue is to replace the breaker with a single phase 32A and pair up the existing wires (L1-L2 N-L3).

Its not illegal to run a red light if you don't get caught.
If you do that and one wire in a pair comes loose you can have 32A in a cable designed for 16A.
A single fault results in an over current problem - possibly fire.

If you keep running red lights every day then one day your luck will run out
pog451
A sneaky way around the issue is to replace the breaker with a single phase 32A and pair up the existing wires (L1-L2 N-L3).

Its not illegal to run a red light if you don't get caught.
Its illegal whether you get caught or not, just the consequences are different. Doing this sort of electrical botch job will almost certainly cause a fire and in Germany, you lose your insurance if the oven was not connected by an electrician even if you did it right. I'm a handy enough DIYer to alot certainly be able to connect an ove, but even I get it done - The risk is too high.
kato
And as for the person who suggested separating the cabling within the
electric stove - the potential between the phases is around 415 volts -
how do you know the stove is insulated to this standard?
No one said anything about hooking it up to the 3-phase socket afterwards.
zoinks208
If you do that and one wire in a pair comes loose you can have 32A in a cable designed for 16A.
Paring up cables is normal in installations to reduce cost. How many 4000A feeds have you seen done with a single conductor?
The main issue with what I suggested is that the wire color will not meet the electrical code after paring up the existing conductors.

All this wiring talk in the cooking section is making me hungry.
YorkshireLad6
I've yet to meet a UK electric cooker, even old ones that won't run on a 2 or 3-phase supply. It's simply a case of removing the phase bridge. For common 4-hobs + oven cookers, internally each pair of hobs has its own circuit (phase) as does the oven. The phase bridge connects them all together in parallel for the 32A (UK) common feed. Remove the bridge and you have 3 distinct phase terminals (L1, L2 and L3) plus (N)eutral and of course (E)arth
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