Best and worst areas of Germany to live in

Recommended cities or rural places, and why

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Aidan Electrik
Hello,

I'll be moving to Germany at the end of the year - preferably to Munich or Berlin, it's still up for grabs. I'd like to know what are the safest areas in either region and the dangerous areas as well and why. I'm from a pretty rough part of town and I'd love to know where I should be and where I shouldn't be (even at a specific time) when I hop off the plane.

Servus!

. Aidan . Electrik // .
silty1
Best place: Freiburg. Hamburg comes in a close second.
Oblomov
What exactly are you looking for? Advice on where to live or are you just afraid to end up in some "no go" area of town all of a sudden? With regard to the latter you may rest assured that the risk of being assaulted physically is rather low in both cities, even in the rougher parts of town, as long as you are not seeking some confrontation actively.
Conquistador
Which bad part of town are you from? If it is East New York, Anacostia, Roxbury, Newark or Detroit (to give a few examples) I suspect the locals might have more to fear from you than the other way around.
Seriously, nothing really to worry about in Munich as Oblomov posted.
gatzke
I doubt you will have any trouble in most places in Germany. Sure, there are bad neighborhoods, but even those are not too bad during the day (AFAIK).

I was out late (for me) recently returning from a trip. While carrying a couple of bags, I saw a group of drunken youths coming toward me. Thinking the worst, I was preparing for anything. One asked me if he could help me carry my bags, like I was an old lady!

As far as enjoying your life here, getting housing close to the city center or close to a Sbahn is probably the biggest factor for you.
Trayay
I can only speak for Munich so I'll just post the areas I think are nice for living and why:

Schwabing:
Lots of possibilities to go out; entertainment; bars

Neuhausen & Nymphenburg:
Nice area, old houses, more quiet but still possibilities to go out, lovely stors

Au & Haidhausen:
Near the river, nice flair

Bogenhausen:
If you want to live where the richer people live

Maxvorstadt:
Just like Schwabing, some of the the University buildings are here

Sendling & Giesing are lovely too.

There are lots of nice areas in Munich, the named ones are the ones I know best. Riem/Trudering might be nice if you're looking for a house/ if you have a family...
Englaender
Rental in Munich is unbelievably expensive, but then I guess it is in Berlin too (no idea.)
pixelpusher
Berlin is one of the cheapest cities in Germany.
ukpunk1
I can only speak for the Oberpfalz. Weiden i. d. OPf., Amberg, Neumarkt i. d. OPf. and Regensburg (University town) are a bit more expensive than the rest of the area, since these are the larger towns. (Regensburg 100,000+, Weiden & Amberg ca. 45,000, Neumarkt ca. 40,000 people) About the land tends to be cheap.
Aidan Electrik
What exactly are you looking for? Advice on where to live or are you just afraid to end up in some "no go" area of town all of a sudden? With regard to the latter you may rest assured that the risk of being assaulted physically is rather low in both cities, even in the rougher parts of town, as long as you are not seeking some confrontation actively.
All of a sudden? No. All of the time. And not just where to live, where to hang out. Places in general. Like here, there are certain place I know I don't need to be with the sun goes down living or leisure activity sake. Would like to know if there are any places like that in the general areas I'm looking to move to.
Aidan Electrik
Which bad part of town are you from? If it is East New York, Anacostia, Roxbury, Newark or Detroit (to give a few examples) I suspect the locals might have more to fear from you than the other way around.
Seriously, nothing really to worry about in Munich as Oblomov posted.
LOL Conquistador! I'm from Newark. I'm so cuddly and sweet though. Like a bunny...a ghetto fab bunny? lol
Aidan Electrik
Awesome! Thank you everyone. Just wanted a little insight. Such a drastic move for me, I may even ask the silliest of questions but the answers surprisingly will do a lot of good.

. Aidan . Electrik // .
Conquistador
LOL Conquistador! I'm from Newark. I'm so cuddly and sweet though. Like a bunny...a ghetto fab bunny? lol
Glad to hear you are harmless. When I was going to high school in Bergen County (Ridgewood) Newark was always a no-go zone.

Have a great time when you get here, and I recommend Munich over Berlin.
Oblomov
Both cities are very distinctive in their characters and very attractive in their own right. Berlin is more agreeable in daily life in a number of aspects: it is more affordable, much more so than Munich with regard to accommodation, it is less crowded, public transport is much better.
As I guess that you are single you may go to live in Mitte or in Prenzlauer Berg in Berlin. Friedrichshain isnĀ“t too bad but it is slightly more gritty. Kreuzberg can be very nice as well but you have to know exactly which parts of it should be avoided.
liebling
Welcome (soon) to Germany. Although Germany is exceedingly safe, there are areas of economic deprivation and slightly higher crime rates (against property, anyway) in German cities. These are normally designated "soziale Brennpunkte" and have increased community policing and extra programs in the schools and social services. An example in Munich is Neuperlach. In Berlin, Neu-Koelln. Like others have said, they're hardly "no-go" areas, though. They tend to be the most culturally diverse parts of town.

Be advised that there are parts of Germany (though not normally in metropoles such as Munich or Berlin) where non-White people are sometimes given a hard time. It's ugly and awful and perpetrated by only a fringe of German society but does happen. Just as racially-motivated harrassment sometimes happens in the States and might be more likely in some parts of the country than in others.

Anyway, fire away with more questions and good luck to you.
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