The expression 'That takes the cake'

Do Brits always say 'biscuit' instead?

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Tomasino
Brits, when you say something like "Oh my goodness, look at him!"

Do you ever say: "Now that takes the cake!"

Or is it ALWAYS AND ONLY "Now that takes the biscuit!" ???

Thanks for any input.
Owain Glyndwr
in that sense, biscuit. only biscuit. no cakes, cookies or biskwiks.

taking the cake is a phrase of american origin and has a totally different meaning, iirc.
angelbeast
Found something here...

something takes the cake
something is the most extreme example. I've known some jerks but you take the cake.

Usage notes: usually said about something bad
Owain Glyndwr
I thought taking the cake in america was something like winning or taking the prize. Brits wouldn't use, i don't reckon.

Taking the biscuit is used by Brits to mean that you think an outcome is incredulous.
Tomasino
Thanks for that. OG cleared up the WHETHER quite succinctly.

I owe you a cookie.

Thanks again, OG!
DMcinDE
As a Brit...definitely, only, "takes the biscuit"
marka
Biscuit. Never cake.
yotti
you can't have your cake and eat it!
Owain Glyndwr
I owe you a cookie.

Thanks again, OG!
I hope you mean the edible kind and not the furry four-legged kind
lilplatinum
Taking the biscuit is used by Brits to mean that you think an outcome is incredulous.
Thats what taking the cake means to Americans.
Owain Glyndwr
Found something here...

something takes the cake
something is the most extreme example. I've known some jerks but you take the cake.

Usage notes: usually said about something bad
I don't think that is the usual usage. The original usage i think meant winning a prize, so let's say Farmer Fred entered his marrows into a vegetable competition. If he won, his marrows would have "taken the cake". It could also be used in this way; lets say before the marrows are judged and prizes awarded some folks are viewing the lovely veggies on offer. Mr Barney sees Farmer Fred's marrow and says to Mrs Betty, "well, if that there marrow doesn't take the cake?" Expressing a surprise at any other outcome than the marrows winning the competition.

Thats what taking the cake means to Americans.
I disagree. saying "that takes the biscuit" in English would mean that you think something or an outcome is so surprising it couldn't true or correct or that it is the last straw.
mlovett
you can't have your cake and eat it!
sure you can! But the expression is "to have your cake and eat it, TOO."
mlovett
one possible explanation
Tomasino
Just for clarity, I, American, use "That takes the cake" in the context of that incredulous thingy up above.

Also can be:

"Dude! Seriously!"
Owain Glyndwr
maybe there has been a merging of biscuits and cakes over the years. A cakuit or Biscake, perhaps.
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