Landlord responsibilities to fix a broken fridge - Germany

How long has he legally got to replace it?

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Kuzzer
Hello Everyone

Help and advice required . . .

Our fridge went kaput on Tuesday - everything well on its way to room temperature by the time we got home from work - so electrician was called (by landlord) and came yesterday (Wednesday) to deliver the news that a new fridge was required. Problem is, it's one of those ones fitted into a fitted kitchen, so needs to be specially ordered etc.

Bottom line is that we're w/o fridge, and €150+ worth of chow - currently residing in cool boxes - is about to spoil.

What responsibility does the landlord have vis-a-vis replacing the fridge and within what timeframe? As stated above, the fridge is a built-in model provided by the landlord as part of the infrastructure when we moved in.

Finally - bit of a punt, this one - does anyone think we'll be able to claim for the spoiled food through our home contents insurance?

Many thanks for any and all help/advice.

Kuzzer
Kuzzer
No-one?

Kuzzer
KäptnKnitterbart
It's totally reasonable that a semi-custom refrigerator would take a bit of time to be delivered. You probably can claim the food under insurace but I have no basis for that.

Google mietminderung if you want to see what you potentially could do about the fridge but it actually sounds like you have a decent landlord.
Mik Dickinson
You've no chance the landlord is being reasonable and fulfilling his responsabilities here.Just one of those things you have to accept.Could always look on T.T. though to see if someone is giving a fridge away.
Kuzzer
Thanks @kaptn and @mik

So, the new fitted fridge arrives on Friday to be, err, fitted (and, presumably, switched on).

My issue here is that as the original fridge was the responsibility of the Landlords (an integral part of the fitted kitchen provided when we moved in), and that although they are sourcing a replacement within a reasonable timeframe, the fact remains that €150+ of perishable foodstuffs have come to grief. Apologies in advance for being in danger of flogging a dead horse, but if someone could advise us on whether to claim this loss against the Landlords' personal liability insurance or against /our/ home contents insurance, that would be very much appreciated.

We do have a very good relationship with the Landlords (frankly, we have to - they live right next door...) - but what has irked us here is that they made no effort whatsoever to provide a /workable/ temporary arrangement (they did say "we have a little space in our cellar fridge" - but can you imagine having to ring their doorbell every time you wanted to make a cup of tea?!). In the end, we borrowed a fridge from the bar down the road.

Anyway, as ever, any advice much appreciated.

K
Mik Dickinson
Try your own insurance
Krieg
We do have a very good relationship with the Landlords (frankly, we have to - they live right next door...) - but what has irked us here is that they made no effort whatsoever to provide a /workable/ temporary arrangement (they did say "we have a little space in our cellar fridge" - but can you imagine having to ring their doorbell every time you wanted to make a cup of tea?!). In the end, we borrowed a fridge from the bar down the road.
I wonder what do you want them to do? They replaced the fridge fast enough and they offered you to use their fridge.

PS. Do you put your tea in the fridge?
Kuzzer
@krieg: our fridge was full; they had only a small amount of space in /their/ fridge - ipso facto - nowhere to put the vast majority of the perishable foodstuffs. Re. the tea, us British have a strange habit of putting milk in it ...

p.s. if you think that throwing away €150+ is a mere drop in the ocean, then I'd be happy to supply you with my Giro a/c number and /you/ can reimburse me - will save me the bother of an insurance claim
Krieg
So, what you wanted them to do?
Kuzzer
At the risk of repeating myself, and if I understand your comment correctly, what we would have /liked/ them to do is provide a /workable/ temporary solution - not a token "we have room in our fridge for half-a-dozen eggs and an half-eaten jar of sauerkraut".

We have been here just a year, but we managed to borrow a fridge from the bar down the road . . . not exactly rocket science.

K
KäptnKnitterbart
You're being very unreasonable. A landlord isn't responsible for every possible eventuality. They're responsible for keeping the house and certain contents in good repair, which this guy is. He couldn't know the refrigerator would break and he did his best to accommodate you -- he offered you space in his fridge and ordered a replacement right away.

Refrigerators breaking is part of this thing called life, and it's up to you to react appropriately. They also have coolers and ice at most gas stations.

Somewhere on a German-language forum there's a guy asking if all English speakers are incapable of reacting to a broken refrigerator.
Kay
what we would have /liked/ them to do is provide a /workable/ temporary solution
Would you also expect them to provide you with a portable toilet if the pipes in your loo got blocked?

Btw, I think your landlord has been very accommodating in the whole affair. If I were you I'd try to stay on good terms with him. Ask your insurance company (you've got nothing to lose by just asking) whether you can claim anything.
Kuzzer
Urghh.

It was never my intention for this thread to descend into a flame war.

The simple fact of the matter is that the space offered in his fridge was completely inadequate, and the solution unworkable (think about how many times you need to visit your fridge on a daily basis - and then equate that with having to ring your landlords' doorbell x times a day to access your milk). And all of that assuming that the Landlord will actually be in at the times you need to access your cow-juice.

All I wanted from my initial post was a bit of friendly TT advice as to (a) the legal position (which no-one has been able to provide), and (b) which route to take for an insurance claim. It seems to me that sometimes people here are too ready to criticise, too reticent to empathise.

>>Would you also expect them to provide you with a portable toilet if the pipes in your loo got blocked?
@Kay: if said blockage was going to take more than 12 hours to rectify, then yes - or are you a fan of shitting on your own carpet?

I think this thread should now come to a timely conclusion, no?

K
Allershausen
Why don't you actually contact your insurance company and ask them if you're covered?
MichiS
All I wanted from my initial post was a bit of friendly TT advice as to (a) the legal position (which no-one has been able to provide), and ( which route to take for an insurance claim. It seems to me that sometimes people here are too ready to criticise, too reticent to empathise.
You wanted to hear you can sue the landlord to any end. You didn't hear it.
If you want legal adice ask a lawyer.
What insurance would/should cover your food?
In German lawterms this is called "allgemeines Lebensrisiko" (general risks of life).
No insurance will cover that. No way to get money from anybody.
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