Is the word "all" singular or plural?

For example, "All of Austria was/were ready"

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Tomasino
It's really quite simple:

Is this sentence correct?:

All of Austria were ready for history to be repeated with a possible “Wonder in Vienna�.

Is it "All were" or "All was"?

Sorry for not paying attention more in fifth grade.
sarabyrd
Austria was united in its desire for history to be repeated with a possible “Wonder in Vienna�.
When in doubt, rephrase.
BadDoggie
"Were" for UK English, "was" for US. Of save the bother and rewrite it, like "The entire country of Austria was..." or "Everyone in Austria was..."

woof.
Jeeves
All of Austria was.

There is only one all.

Edit: not correct in this case, BD.
"All of Austria were united" ... er, I think not.
don_riina
All of Austria was, but all Austrians were. For correct UK English, chuck in a few swear words though - cannot mention foreigners without at least a "bleedin'" involved.
BadDoggie
All of Austria was.

There is only one all.
You're right. I skimmed through the question and answered too quickly, reading the sentence other than in the way it had been written. There is but one "all"... unless he's using "All" to mean "The people" in a more archaic construction it could go plural.

woof.
eurovol
"Were" for UK English, "was" for US.
Not in my part of the US. I learned that it basically depended on what "all" referred to. All of the best people were hip to that, although all of Tennessee was not.
Bipa
All was going well. (ok... sounds good)

All of them was doing well (doesn't sound very good at all)
All of them were doing well (much better)
All were doing well.

All were rescued. (the "of them" or "of the people" is implied)

So it also depends on whether there's a descriptive phrase afterward the "all", or like what Eurovol wrote.
liutaia
Depends on what the all is refering to. Austria is singular, thus "All of Austria was...", however, if you're talking about the Austrians (plural), it would be "All of the Austrians were..."
bohemka
I know this much: It's "IBM Presents"
eurovol
I Be Moran Presents

I, Being Moranic, Present
BadDoggie
I Be Moran Presents

I, Being Moranic, Present
You wrote it. Me, I'm just the librarian.

woof.
Tomasino
Austria was united in its desire for history to be repeated with a possible “Wonder in Vienna�.
When in doubt, rephrase.
Good idea, but we were kind of trying to resolve the rule in this case. Totally agree with rewording when ambiguous though.

All of Austria was.

There is only one all.

Edit: not correct in this case, BD.
"All of Austria were united" ... er, I think not.
Well, if I take Krieg's BBC link at face value:

All - with plural or singular verb forms

However, if we wish to specify the things or people under discussion, we can use all or all of with nouns and pronouns and the correspondingly correct singular or plural verb forms. Compare the following:

All (of) my friends have come to my party.
All of us are going to Sam's party next week. We're all going.
All of them were singing Happy Birthday.
They were all singing Happy Birthday when the lights went out.
Based on the BBC rules given, I think I would be more inclined to use are/were, as the spirit of the "all of Austria" comes from "All Austrians.

"Were" for UK English, "was" for US. Of save the bother and rewrite it, like "The entire country of Austria was..." or "Everyone in Austria was..."

woof.
Hmmm, really wondering if this is an "IBM are" vs. "IBM is" issue.

(On a side-note, back in Yankee-land during baseball games we had IBM commercials having you guess the correct baseball call in tricky situations called "IBM present(s): You make the call!" Perhaps during cricket matches you Limeys had "IBM present(): You make the call!"

Not in my part of the US. I learned that it basically depended on what "all" referred to. All of the best people were hip to that, although all of Tennessee was not.
Another good point. But the example asks the questions whether "of Tennessee" refers to "people" and for that matter, whether "of Tennessee" refers to all of the best people in Tennessee, assuming there are good people from Tennessee.

Often, people have a strong opinion about things, and indeed, credence is befitting to "how something sounds".

Albeit, when in doubt, a good rule look-up solves the deal for me, rather than how things sound. When pub-speak starts sounding normal, that's when things start going awry.

Lunatical rant over...
Tomasino
I know this much: It's "IBM Presents"
You beat me...
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