Driving Licence Registration - not done in time

79 posts in this topic

Posted

It has just occurred to me after a number of years living here that I still have my driving licence registered to the UK address of my parents.

Does anybody know if this is valid, or legal?

It is one of the newer EU driving Licences that looks like a credit card!

cheers,

Gentleman

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Posted

Its valid and legal.

;)

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Posted

Well I have been told that it is legal as that is what I still have after almost five years of being here.

So I hope this is true as I don't want to chane to a German one

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Posted

Actually, I wouldn't mind having a German and a British License (yes I know it's not allowed ). When I get stopped by the Germans I show the British one, and in England I show the German one. :)

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Posted

German ones are quite good actually.

First, they do not expire on your 70th Birthday - they don't expire at all.

Second, you are not required to carry an endorsment paper with your german licence, unlike the UK one which is technically only valid with that silly useless piece of paper, which goes against the principle of having a card in the first place.

Its like going to a bank machine, sticking your Bank card in to it, and up pops the message "to withdraw cash, please insert a cheque, stating the amount you require, into the slot on the right-hand-side of this machine"

DOH! :doh:

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Posted

WHAT!!! I am expected to carry my papers as well! OUPS (big-time)!

Do you know if this is the same for a UK (EU) driving licence here in Germany? So if the police stop me and I only have my card I can get into problems here! (Policeman takes out the rubber gloves)

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Posted

Hi Gentleman

No it's not valid and but it is legal, well not in the eyes of the DVLC!

If you have changed your country of residence and have been out of the UK for more than 12 months then you have to inform Swansea and change your license to the German one. If not and Swansea find out, they will slap you with a nice fine of up to 1000GBP. They tried to do this with me but I managed to talk them out of it! ;)

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Posted

By the way; Getting parking tickets or getting flashed by fixed cameras in a German registered car whilst in the UK might be ignored by the authorities (What a bonus! ;) ) but as a buddy from Munster found out not so long ago, actually get stopped by the UK Police for an offence with a foreign licence or driving a foreign car and it's a whole different ball-game:

Got stopped at 85mph on the A1.

Car impounded

Held overnight in Stamford Police cells until an appearance in the magistrates court the next morning.

No licence and no car until the fine paid.

I guess this is because if they'd let him go and sent the fixed penalty on later (you can't pay the Police at the roadside unlike in Germany) he could bugger off back to Germany and they wouldn't be able to get their cash.

You've been warned!

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Posted

A friend of ours got stopped in the UK in a German car. Copper starts asking him questions and he starts talking back in German but German a la Basil Fawlty. He said the accent was so cheesy but the copper fell for it and told him using sign language to Drive slowly while motioning with his hands and shaking his head at the same time. Too fast no (shakes head) slowly (yes nodding)

We got stopped on the A1 in a US Forces registered car doing 90mph. My husband puts on his best yes officer American accent and hands over his US license and kept the UK one safely in his wallet. police weren't interested, too much paperwork involved :)

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Posted

I guess it depends on the copper really - My biggest fear is being stopped, putting on the accent and finding the only English rozzer who speaks fluent German - It'd be just my luck for that to happen :wacko:

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Posted

I managed to lose my UK licence about twenty years ago and had to get a new one, then some time later found the original licence again. As a result I've also got both licences. I must say, it does make life easier on occasions! :lol:

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Posted

About the address on a UK license... I was worried about this and had an email exchange with DVLA on this topic. Their final answer is below - I think it is quite definitive.

Ciao

JG

===========================

Thank you for your e-mail.

Your understanding is correct.

Under the terms of the EC second directive on driving licensing it is accepted that drivers with an EC member state licence who move to another part of the EC will be driving with an incorrect address on their licence.

Regards

Miss T. Owen.

Customers Enquiries Drivers.

C1

Tel: 0870 240 009

drivers.dvla@gtnet.gov.uk

www.dvla.gov.uk

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Posted

will be driving with an incorrect address on their licence.

I'm not sure whether I would consider that definitive or not. Is an incorrect address acceptible/legal or not. I don't see a concrete decision in this explanation.

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Posted

I still have my parents UK address on mine, and from what I read in the other threads the DVLA wont accept a our german addresses???

so whats this mean,,we have to change our UK licence for a german one?? and in doing so lose out UK licence? :blink:

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Posted

If you live in Germany for more than a year (I believe, I'm not exactly sure of the time period) then officially you must give up your UK driving licence and take out a German one. There are no ifs and buts, and if Swansea discover it, it can cost you a painful amount of money.

There are no tests involved and it's not even particularly expensive (sorry, it's too long ago, I can't remember exactly how much), so there's really no reason not to do it.

On top of that, with a German licence you have exclusive use of the reserved parking places clearly marked with double yellow lines! :D

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Posted

with a German licence you have exclusive use of the reserved parking places clearly marked with double yellow lines! 

that shall be fun! :lol:

ok, IF? I was to change license for gerry one...how long does it take, and can I still drive while waiting for the DE licence to come through?

I also cant understand why they have to take away our UK licence!

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Posted

I also cant understand why they have to take away our UK licence!

Simple - to avoid the situation that after some traffic offense they confiscate your license and you blithely carry on driving and present the second license at any traffic control - not to mention reserved parking spaces in the other country! :lol:

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Posted

gentleman

WHAT!!! I am expected to carry my papers as well! OUPS (big-time)!
In the UK with a UK licence you are! We discovered that only last week when Hertz in the UK refused to enter one of our group as a named driver on the rental contract 'cos he did not have his papers with his UK licence.

The German licence does not have, or require such papers.

RMA

If you live in Germany for more than a year (I believe, I'm not exactly sure of the time period) then officially you must give up your UK driving licence and take out a German one. There are no ifs and buts,

aha! :D well you did say you believe... However there are if's and buts.

if: if you are in posession of any EU licence, this is valid in any EU country until its epiry date. Then and only then are you obliged to renew it into the local licence of the EU country you reside in.

but: But what the DVLC and the address on my UK licence? You can (if you really want to change your licence into a local one but I would not really worry about it... the DVLC have no authoritve powers outside of the UK (with the exception of the fact that the licence they issued is legal outside of the UK)

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Posted

wowser :o , did I understand this right? Some of you say, that actually ONE thing in Germany might be a LITTLE BIT better than in UK :o

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Posted

two things actually Hannah...

Autobahn sections with no speed limit is the other only good thing about Germany :P

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Posted

What I cannot believe is the 1000 pound charge for not reregistering. This is something that I have come to accept from German burocrats, but that in England! Holy cow! I better start saving it up then!!! ;)

The only problem so far on this thread is that we have two different theories “registration to German Driving Licence is compulsory

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Posted

if you are in posession of any EU licence, this is valid in any EU country until its epiry date.
Oops, good job I hedged my bets!

You're right, I should have remembered it because I read it only recently in connection with this Polish driving school business. I suspect it may have changed somewhere along the line, because I nearly got into big trouble when I first came over here 1980 - 81, fortunately I was able to prove that I hadn't been in the country continuously for more than a year.

What I cannot believe is the 1000 pound charge for not reregistering. This is something that I have come to accept from German burocrats, but that in England! Holy cow! I better start saving it up then!!!

It's easy enough to understand when you remember that we don't have any ID papers or "Meldepflicht" in the UK and any any government silly enough to try and push such a law through would be out on its ear at the next election. So twenty-odd years ago some bright spark realised that virtually everybody nowadays has a driving licence and this law was introduced as a sort of back door version of ID and "Meldepflicht" - hence the high penalty.

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Posted

I was stopped a couple of years ago in a Polizeikontrolle on a Friday night and told I couldn't drive any further, because my UK (EU) driving license was no longer valid, as I should have exchanged it for a German one.

:huh:

Furthermore, the police were going to prosecute me for driving without a license! :wacko:

Luckily, I had someone with me, who could drive...

I went to the Landesamt on the Monday and they explained to me that my license WAS valid, I just neede to pay EUR 12.00 (I think it was) to get it registered in Flensburg, for endorsements. I then had a letter from the Filth a few weeks later, saying they were generously dropping all charges. Twats.

:angry:

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Posted

I believe that Germany is a Member State of the EU and are therefore bound by EU law. Furthermore, EU legislation supercedes past, present and future national legislation. Therefore, it does not matter how many local or national laws about driving licenses are enacted in Germany - what counts is EU law. (of course, this applies in the UK too).

The following is directly from the europe.eu.int website ... Note the last sentence.

INFORMATION ON COMMUNITY LAW

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES

Strictly speaking, there is no Community driving licence. Since 1 July 1996, Member States have issued a "Community model" driving licence in order to make it easier to understand driving licences issued by individual Member States and to facilitate their mutual recognition.

According to the Court of Justice Case C-230/97 Awoyemi), this principle of mutual recognition is deemed to have a number of direct effects and, as a result, to be applicable from the date of application of the Directive (1 July 1996) (see Article 12 of the Directive)

Any driving licence issued by a Member State must be recognised by the other Member States, even if the licence is old and does not correspond to the Community model, provided it is still valid. This is why the Directive provides equivalence tables for licences issued before 1 July 1996, subject to the Commission's agreement (an agreement concluded in the legal form of a Decision, and adopted on 21 March 2000 by the Commission).

Important: You no longer have to exchange your original licence if you go to live in another Member State but you can apply to do so if you wish.

Ciao

JG

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Posted

Well that sorts that one out then - And the only reason DVLA want your current address on your licence is so that the Police can trace you if you commit a motoring offence. If you could have a German address on your UK licence and you were had up for a motoring offence back home, as the Polizei won't and aren't required yet talk with the UK cops over such issues they'd be a bit stuffed if they wanted a conviction.

It's common sense really - Since we're EU citizens and don't have to register our existence as residents in the UK (bizarre considering the threat Bliar/Bush have put us under now but there you go), simply make sure your UK licence has on it an address in the UK through which you can be contacted.

If the Police come looking at an address where you are no longer known then they can ask the DVLA to suspend your licence - The next time you get stopped in Blighty, hey presto, they've got you.

In the UK with a UK licence you are! We discovered that only last week when Hertz in the UK refused to enter one of our group as a named driver on the rental contract 'cos he did not have his papers with his UK licence.

This simply isn't true. There is no requirement to carry your papers with you in the UK - In fact with theft and car crime as it is in the UK Home Office and Police guidelines are to positively discourage it.

The wallet with my German papers for my car and my registration etc are put in the house when I'm in the UK.

Clearly though, if you go to hire a car firstly the rental company are going to want to know that you have a licence to drive; Furthemore the licence, the photo and the address and signature on it are used as part of the identity process along with a credit card - Fairly reasonable since in return they're giving you 10K plus worth car! :ph34r:

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