Mathematical question about angles

21 posts in this topic

Posted

It's been a while and my geometry is getting rusty:

The filing cabinet is 2.40 m high. The room is either 2.52 m or 2.70 m high (two rooms).

Simple question: Can the cabinets be set up in the rooms?

Thank you for useful or amusing answers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

You mean can it be assembled on the floor and then lifted up and tipped into position? If so you would also need to know the depth too in order to work it out. It also might be possible to assemble it upright...we did that with our IKEA wardrobe and only have a 1cm clearance at the top.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Just out of curiosity, who's going to be going through the top drawer or two? It would be much more practical and safer (considering possible falls from the office chair that she'll use instead of the step ladder standing right next to the cabinet) to get two 1.2 meter cabinets.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

It depends what you mean by 'Set Up' and how wide your cabinets are.

Assuming the door is big enough then of course a 2.4 meter cabinet will fit in a 2.52 meter room, so I suppose you mean that you will bring the cabinet in on it's side and rotate it into position.

In which case...

A 75 cm wide by 2.4 meter high cabinet has a long diagonal of just over 2.514 meters so it can be stood up in the smaller room but it will be close.

Anything wider than 77cm won't work.

For the bigger room the limit is about 1.4 meters wide.

Obviously depending on which axis you rotate around, substitute 'deep' for 'wide'.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

height 2.40 m

width 1.03 m

depth .45 m

It's not drawers, it's a massive Aktenschrank. Get your mind out of the gutter.

We want to move it in pieces and assemble it in each room, either lying down and hoisting it up, or upright.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

As pappnase said above then. Your shortest "long diagonal" is around 2.44m so it should be able to be lifted up in either room.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Where's Fry on QI when you need him?!! :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

This iudex calculats all sorts of things, just not geometrical ones. I will tell the movers that the great minds on TT say that it can be built, and the files will come.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

pythagorus theorem :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_theorem

a = sqrt(b^2 + c^2)

no angles required.. with 2.40 and 0.45 it becomes sqrt(2.4*2.4 + 0.45*0.45) = 2.4418 m

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

More maths fun!

Filing cabinet dimensions = 240 x 103 x 45 cm = 1,112,400 cubic cm. Round it to 1,000,00 cubic cm.

According to amazon, standard box of 5 reams of A4 paper is 14.8 x 40 x 26.8 cm = 15,865.60 cubic cm. Let's call it 15,500 cm to account for the packing carton, etc.

It weighs 2.3 kg.

So, with a rough calculation (ignoring the fact that there will be some space in it) if you stuffed the cabinet full of paper, you could squeeze in about 1,000,000/15,500 * 2.3 = about 148 kg of paper.

Most floors should be strong enough to support that even when you add the weight of the filing cabinet itself. :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Thank you all! I will report on the success.

(Bearing in mind that I only measured the full height of the cabinet including the base; the doors are shorter than 2.40 m, of course)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

How about: height of the thing + (depth / 2). The thing is at its highest when you tilt it at 45 degrees at which point the overall height is half its depth higher than when it's flat. Oder?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

@gwaptiva ... Unless the thing is square then it won't be at it's tallest when tilted to 45 degrees.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Good thing I'm just a code monkey and have no need of maths

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

with your given dimensions and a depth of 0.45 m you need 0.23 m clearance (9"minimum) so: total height of 2.4 m + 0.23 m= ceiling clearance of 2.63 m (minimum!) you need a liittle more to make up for variances in the floor/ceiling.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Why do you need clearances, and why 2.3 cm?

The cabinet is not going to remain on-edge indefinitely.

-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Do make sure that they anchor it well at the top to the wall and/or ceiling.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

ardiri is right. I misread the problem. The hypotenuse (tallest distance) will be sqrt(2.4^2+0.45^2)=2.442 m. Clearance is just for swinging it into place. It is just the leftover headroom after it is standing upright.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

You should have a little over 3" clearance ( 2.52 m room minus the 2.44 m hypotense of height and depth) when tilted at 45 degrees

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I forgot all about this topic. Anyway, they built up the cabinets very nicely, no scrapes on the ceiling or other evidence of problems.

Thank you all again for the responses!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now