MSG-free bouillon/stock brand

19 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi,

 

I am looking for some bouillon or stock that doesn't contain MSG. I haven't been able to find anything so I am wondering if anyone knows of a brand that does it and where to buy it.

 

There are a lot of different names for MSG on food packaging. It may be labeled Mononatrium Glutamat, Natrium Glutamat, Geschmackverstärker, or E 621. But also things such as "yeast extract" (hefeextrakt) are basically MSG.

 

This is a list of labeling terms in English that are MSG... http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.html

 

Thanks in advance. :)

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Posted

Best I've found is - 'Marigold Swiss Vegetable Bouillon Powder' its obsessively free from most nasties and you can order it from amazon in either boggo or organic powder tubs.

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Posted

Even the "bio" ones are mostly salt (like Rewe's). Gusto-brand (Aldi?) and Maggi Bio aren't, but they're hard to find, usually in the Bio section or over by the Alnatura stuff at Hit (Alnatura's own stuff, while "bio", is mostly salt).

 

There are also some unfamiliar labels which aren't primarily salt; you have to look at the ingredients (which can be fucking hard since the typeface is usually 6pt Helvetica thin).

 

woof.

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Posted

I use this range.

 

It's got no preservatives or flavour enhancers.

 

I thoroughly recommend it. It's available at most supermarkets.

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Posted

Yes, I agree with Hazza.

 

http://www.knorr.co.uk/Products/Knorr-Stock-Pots.aspx

 

it states here they are free of MSG.

 

They really do taste good, we buy them because they are also gluten-free.

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Posted

Here are the ingredients from the jar of Maggie Natur Pur Bio Gemüsebrühe I have. Our Edeka carries it. It says "ohne Hefeextrakt" on the label, but who knows. I use it sparingly

 

Salz, 19.9% Gemüse (Zwiebeln, Pastinakenpulver, Selleriepulver, Karotten, Maltodextrin, Zucker, 2.6% Sonnenblumenöl, Kräuter (Petersilie, Liebestöckel), Gewürze.

 

I believe the Knorr Buillon Pur range does contain yeast extract unless they have changed the ingredients lately. They're allowed to say "ohne geschmacksverstärkende Zusatzstoffe" and still use it.

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Posted

Don't succumb to the hype.

 

There is nothing wrong with yeast extract. There are a whole lot of other foods that have high levels of glutamate, including tomatoes, cheese, walnuts, mushrooms, broccoli and peas.

 

Do you avoid these foods too, because of the glutamate content?

 

Furthermore, the chief scientist of the FSA (Food Standards Agency) even argues that MSG isn't as bad as it's always made out to be.

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Posted

 

Salz, 19.9% Gemüse (Zwiebeln, Pastinakenpulver, Selleriepulver, Karotten, Maltodextrin, Zucker, 2.6% Sonnenblumenöl, Kräuter (Petersilie, Liebestöckel), Gewürze.

 

Also...

 

Not wanting to come down too hard on westvan - because what you're asking for is very hard to find. But even this isn't great. Ingredients are listed in order of quantity, so you're getting 20% salt in this at an absolute minimum. Plus Maltodextrin is highly processed and may not be that great for you either. Plus, it doesn't really look that great. You've basically got a shitload of salt, some dried veges and some herbs.

 

If you really want to avoid any "bad" ingredients, but still come up with something worthwhile, then you may not have any choice but to make your own stock.

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Posted

Totally agree with you, actually, Hazza. I know it's not great and I don't use it often. Tons of salt in there for sure. When I make soup I usually do make my own with fresh vegetables but once in a while I will use this stuff. I don't really care about öko or bio or whatever, but I do react badly to MSG and foods with a lot of glutamate in them - mushrooms, parmesan cheese etc.

 

Don't know if the OP was only concerned about the glutamate content. That's why I posted the ingredients so he can decide for himself.

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Posted

I make my own stock every once in a while.

 

It's actually not too hard.

 

For chicken stock, I use a chook (with organs), carrots, onions, celery, leek, parsley, peppercorns, garlic and a bit of vinegar.

 

Boil up and let the whole thing simmer for a bloody long time - the longer, then better - but 6 hours at an absolute minimum.

 

Remove all the meat and veges and pour through a sieve and you basically end up with soup. Cool and remove the fat from the top. Then reheat and then boil away most of the water. separate into individual portions and freeze.

 

Simple

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Posted

Hi there,

When I first arrived here I was tasked with cooking for all my colleagues (this task rotates amongst us once a week). One of them did not want to have monosodium glutamate in the food and the other one is gluten intolerant. I went to REWE and found a brand of stock called "BioGourmet." The ingredients of the chicken stock I bought from them are on their web site: Bio Gourmet's web site

To be honest with you, as some people have so many different preferences that are not necessarily linked to health issues, I can no longer be bothered to go to the shops and try to find the stock that pleases everyone. Therefore I make the stock myself - it takes less time than going to the shops.

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Posted

my husband has a colon issue and msg seems to be a trigger so Im always conscious of it when buying stock, its intresting that knoor pur has no msg while the normal bouliion in jars has quite a bit. Aldi had a simaler thing a few weeks ago again with no msg, so we shal see how that works out.

<-@

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Posted

I also make my own stock.

One or even two whole chickens in the pressure cooker with plenty of carrots, celery, onions, leeks, fresh rosemary, fresh sage (plenty) and fresh thyme, garlic, bay leaf, peppercorns...

I only cook it for about two hrs (one hr under pressure and the other to reduce the stock a little).

Then let it cool long enough to be able to strip the chicken meat of the bones for the best tasting moist chicken salad ever.

 

Before tossing the bones back in, I cut and break them into small pieces with heavy duty garden sheers and refrigerate the lot over night.

The next day I bring it to boil and simmer to reduce further for another hr or so, add sea salt to taste.

Strain it and done

This yields enough stock to cook up a storm for a month, thus I freeze at least half of it right away in handy little portions.

The rest gets refrigerated in a large airtight glass jar.

I also don't remove most of the fat, because much of the taste is in the fat, but choose an appropriate/fat/stock ratio for the dish I am about to make.

 

Whatever I cook tastes pretty fantastic, because I don't put any of that nasty Knorr or Maggy crap in my dishes.

I also think that the Maggy/Knorr stuff kills the taste of your other ingredients because it's so distinctly dominant.

The taste difference is night and day in the same dish.

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Posted

I know how to make my own stock. Better than most people I should imagine. Beef stock however takes an absolute age to make properly, so I will happily use the "Knorr Bouillon pur" that Hazza linked to earlier. It is surprisingly good.

 

I personally don'T really give a toss about MSG content, because I actually have MSG in my kitchen, and I'm not afraid to use it. There are some asian dishes that simply taste shite without MSG. The problem really lies in the fact that you cannot really reduce stock-cube stock down properly, it just gets too salty. The bouillon pur stuff though, really is one of the best in a bad bunch.

 

However, do not go near the "Knorr Sauce Pur". It is utterly vile. You're better off using the bouillon version, chucking in some fresh veg to arrest the flavour a bit, and reducing it down a bit to make a sauce.

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Posted

In case nobody knows, German knorr stock cubes contain msg and the english ones don't. I am pretty well stocked up.

 

post-578-13639444365096_thumb.jpg

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Posted

I have to agree with Hazza - I use the Knorr Bouillon stock pots as well and think they're excellent for all types of cuisines when you need a gravy / broth. I also feel that compared to most of the other stock cubes I've had, they seem to be lower on the salt since I usually do need to additionally flavour the food with more salt.

 

I also do make my own stock , usually whatever bits of veggies left over at the end of a week - frozen into cubes in ice trays. Way more convenient to just dunk them in.

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Posted

REWE carries some bio bouillons in its bio section as powder in glass jars.

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Posted

 

In case nobody knows, German knorr stock cubes contain msg and the english ones don't. I am pretty well stocked up.

 

post-578-13639444365096_thumb.jpg

 

But they're not cubes! One side is too short. FALSE ADVERTISING!!!

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