Tap water in Hamburg

22 posts in this topic

Posted

It seems..kinda..slimey. :(

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Posted

On the whole, it's perfectly safe to drink. You may find it slimey due to the government control over its quality ;-)

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Posted

slimey is OK but you should stop drinking it if it starts to get chewy...

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Posted

Thats f'n disgusting.

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Posted

Slime, horsement and various chewables well-filtered by Brita - just remember to change that cartridge often enough.

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Posted

it might also be an issue of the pipes in your building...

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Posted

If you let it sit for a while the slime sinks to the bottom of the glass. Seriously, though, the tap water all over Germany is of good quality and perfectly safe to drink. Unlike lasagne, tap water undergoes rigorous testing.

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Posted

I live close to Hamburg & find that the water tastes pretty good - better than that where I lived in the UK.

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Posted

I always found it quite delicious. Sounds like a local issue.

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Posted

I think it is fine but, it does seem that all the local Germans don't drink it.

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Posted

I hope it's safe because I drink it a lot. But not at one of the buildings I work in because it tastes bad there no matter how long I let it run. It's probably your pipes.

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Posted

 

It's probably your pipes.

 

....Mrs ..oh no my trousers have fallen down and here comes the vicar

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Posted

 

It is Mandatory for all Hamburgers, including visitors from other cultures or planets, to have free access to information on the safety and quality of the tap water. This free access to such trivial meaning vital information is, of course, just another obvious example of the wasteful squandering of taxes on gubmint welfare programs in support of the conspiracy to make life under socialism in Germany unbearable to freedumb lubbing libbatarayn roytwingaz and is a part of the grand plan supported by all Europeans (and the UN) to embarrass Ayny Mandatory true patriotz caught unawarez in furrin terrytoryz.

 

 

On a more serious note, Mandatory, if the time you intend to spend in (Toytown+)Germany is not going to be tied up with posting questions to which you could quickly and easily find answers yourself you need to learn how to get the best out of google and wikipedia.

 

Some clues: Using the suffix .de will often find German source links and info pages where the suffix .com will not. Looking up the German names of one or two key words before googling may pay off. For dealing with German websites or text then translate.google.com is a link you may find worth keeping as an open tab. Choose your language parameters and you can paste blocks up to a few hundred words in and it will auto-translate to the best of a machine translator's ability. (Consider the options for a word like 'bow' to get an idea of the nonsense phrasing it can incorporate.) In addition you can copy/paste the URL of a German website in, click on 'Translating.' and, in a few moments, you can read the basic page contents.

 

eg. In this case you wanted to know if tap water in Hamburg is safe to drink. Tap water =Leitungswasser (Drinking water = Trinkwasser) Water quality/ies (Qualität/en) are common headings used around the world by all water suppliers in defining safety, sediment content, drinking water analysis, etc..

 

leitungswasser+qualität+hamburg >google.de = search result

 

#1 link = http://www.hamburgwasser.de/wasserqualitaet.html I don't see an English language button (on German websites there's often a UK/US flag or simply the word English) although I didn't look too hard for one either. Sometimes a site search using English key words will pull up press releases or visitor info. Anyway, that page has sections covering Trinkwasserqualität*, Wasseranalysen*, Wasserhärte*, Blei- und Kupfer- Analysen*, Legionellen im Trinkwasser verhindern (<- what precautions you can take to help prevent potential outbreaks of Legionaires disease).

 

*You may want to look at *those sections and, if the option is offered, put your address in to see if there are any known local analysis results which may be affecting the visible or fluid qualities of your tap water. Hamburg Water - Water quality (google translation)

 

Hope that helps you in coming to terms with HH’s slimy socialist water.

 

2B

 

Thank you, I will be sure to checkout hamburgwasser.de. I will also perform a few of my own tests on the socialist water here before I drink more of it, just to make sure its ok.

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Posted

 

It's probably your pipes.

 

It's probably my pipes?! Why? Do they make them out of lead?!

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Posted

Used to - are you in a very old building?

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Posted

I think it was built sometime around the late 60's or early 70's.

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Posted

In buildings built at that time it's unlikely any lead piping was used although lead may still have been involved in solder jointing of some copper or steel pipes. Lead was recognised as a potential health risk sometime in the 1930s IIRC. As it had been in almost universal use, beyond the large bore iron (later steel) mains inlets, phasing it out took until around the mid-century I believe. As iron and steel mains pipes deteriorate they, like low pressure building piping, are gradually being replaced with plastic alternatives.

 

Late 1960s early 1970s could be iron/steel/copper, steel/copper or even all copper. Mid 70s onward tend to be steel/copper/plastic although it always depended on architects specs, bore dimensions, pressure and budget. Since the early 1960s there have been statutory Mandatory standards in place so its possible to verify that, which would be safer than relying on my unqualified half-knowledge anyway. If you want to, then here's an English language source where you can start Industrial pipe, tube and fittings standards and specifications from the DIN - Deutsches Institut für Normung

You'll see the item description and introduction year listed alongside the DIN spec number. Once you find the DIN number for the item your looking for then I expect you can use the site tools to find and read the Mandatory specification details.

 

Hope that helps, comrade. Solidarity against slime! Vive la revolution!

 

2B

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Posted

 

I think it is fine but, it does seem that all the local Germans don't drink it.

 

Yep, I drank it, yet my husband didn't, and none of my Harburgian in-laws do. My FIL worked for the HH water company. :ph34r:

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