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Tafelspitz silberner beef cut

17 posts in this topic

Posted

I felt like making roast beef and Yorkshire pudding and only managed to find a tafelspitz silberner cut if beef. It looks great with very little fat. Is it suitable for roasting or should I make something else more appropriate? I don't often cook red meat so not very clued up. Any suggestions would be gratefully received. Many thanks

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Posted

1. Put meat in about 5 liters of water with some laurel leafs and peppercorns

2. Cook just below boiling point for about 3 hours until very tender

3. Eat Tafelspitz.

To answer your question, i wouldn't really consider it suitable for roasting.

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Posted

But Kato, real Tafelspitz is tender meat so why shouldn't you be able to roast it? Actually, I just googled it to make sure(Tafelspitz als Braten) and found plenty of recipes and people who say that they use it for roasting.

Having said that, I couldn't tell if it fulfills the requirements for a proper English Sunday roast, of course.

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Posted

Sure you can roast it, just like any meat ;)

It just won't taste like (as in as good as) standard roast meat - the fibres in Tafelspitz are a lot firmer than tenderloin and it becomes dry and tough easily when roasted. The main reason for this is that Tafelspitz as simmering meat is hung only a few days instead of weeks as meat for roasting - hanging relaxes the muscle and tenders up the cell structures of the meat.

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Posted

Come on kato tell us what we should buy :D

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Posted

Ah, thanks! I thought all beef is hung for weeks. Perhaps emkay should go back and ask at the butcher's?

This thread made me remember fondly the best meat I've ever had: a Sunday roast in some pub in a tiny village somewhere near Banbury, ages ago.

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Posted

Thank you all very much for the suggestions. As we all have flu at the moment, there won't be any cooking today! I'll try to find my trusted 70's Readers Digest cookbook. I think the best sounds to be braise or pot roast. Thanks again.

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Posted

So sorry friederike, just negged you by mistake. Hopeless using my mobile. Thanks for all your help

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Posted

I've tried to eat a steak a few times here and I am convinced that all beef in Germany is sourced from Continental, or possibly Michelin.

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Posted

So sorry friederike, just negged you by mistake.

*sulking* ;)

Get well soon!

We usually buy great local (Hohenlohe) beef from our local butcher's. They now sell what they call "dry aged beef" and it's excellent, not a trace of Michelin or Continental. The sole exception ever in all those years was the roast we bought this Christmas.

When making steaks, my husband sears them for 90 seconds on each side, then puts the pan (all iron) in the oven at a very low temperature (I think 80 or 90 degrees) for some time, depending on the thickness of the meat. They come out great and very, very tasty unless the meat is tough, like at Christmas :rolleyes: Since he discovered this method, I don't usually order beef when eating out - a waste of money as it never tastes as good as at home.

Jamie Oliver's method sounds great, too. We'll definitely try this.

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Posted

This is a fantastic recipe for tafelspitz as correctly mentioned before, it is an economical tasty but tough cut. Nigel Slaters beer and beef is really easy either in pressure cooker (schnell Koch Topf ) or in casserole dish over 3 hrs in an oven 170c. Through trial and error, I find a good dunkel weiß Beer (about 1 Liter for 750g beef) together with some redcurrent or blackcurrant jelly works best.

Link here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/dec/28/nigel-slater-beer-recipes

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Posted

The said joint of tafelspitz has now been in the freezer since my op. Is it safe to eat after 7 months frozen? Can't seem to find anything conclusive when googling. People saying that they throw stuff away after 3 months and other keeping stuff for years. Guess they lived to tell the ale :D

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Posted

It is safe, but may have lost a bit of flavor. Freezing dries it out. Just roast it slow, in a covered roasting dish or pan, with some flavorful ingredients,& liquids.

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Posted

Thank you Moondancer. A good red wine should help too I guess. I made coq au vin recently, the French red was very very flavorsome. Defrosting now so if it doesn't smell off then dinner tomorrow.

Thanks again

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Posted

Turned out brilliantly. Used this recipe Recipe

Cooked it longer than recipe says...about 5 hours on lower heat and a bit extra full bodied red wine. :D

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