Life in Kreischa

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Posted

Guten Tag everybody.

 

I hope someone can help me with some general information.

 

Asking because of a job offer. What kind of a place is Kreischa? Main question would probably be, if one were to work in Kreischa, would he rent an apartment in Dresden, and travel everyday? I hope it's not far and the transport is good. Also, I would like to know the opinions, if Dresden is a good place to live. I don't wanna go into east/west thing, and why people don't recommend east, I'd actually just like a conformation of a great, modern quality of life in Dresden since I see no reason why it wouldn't be so. Married, early 30s, one young kid.

 

Thanks in advance

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Posted

'Abend Gandalf!

Just for info, if you type Dresden into the TT search box (top right) you'll get about 100 hits. I've no doubt that some of the threads to which these link will help you to find out a little of what you need to know about the city. Wikipedia might also be useful in providing a basic overview.

I don't know much about Kreischa except that it's about 30 minutes from Dresden by bus with services (no direct connection as far as I can see) running every 20 minutes on weekdays. I'd imagine that driving would be more convenient and faster too, but I've never commuted from one to the other.

If you want to be near to the biggest & best shops and also close to the action, you'll want to live in Dresden. Clearly, as Google Maps will show you, Kreischa can offer nice big village or small town living rather than any big city stuff.

I'd guess that an apartment in a reasonable part of Dresden would be a lot more pricey than the equivalent in Kreischa, but only searching both places for what sort of place you might like will give you a more solid answer.

I'm sure that your potential employer will be able to guide you as to the pros & cons of Dresden versus Kreischa, after all he knows both places well and knows what you'll be earning etc., etc.

Good luck in your endeavours!

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Posted

Thanks Brit. I did search quite a bit. Since i'm moving countries, looking for all the info I can get. Esp. first hand.

Also, since I come from a place where the word commute isn't even in use, meaning you can walk and be wherever you wanna in minutes, and I would of course like to live in Dresden, just wondered if it would be something like an hour spent in a bus/train twice a day.

 

Thanks again.

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Posted

i can give you some insight of Dresden. I have been to the city fours times for extended periods. it is a large modern city, with impressive history and a lot of things to do. the center has been completely reconstructed and it is magnificent. There is also the neustadt area with more alternative action going on. It is a plce where things are happening. It is an impressive mixture of old and new architecture together with the communist architecture. It also has its run down areas and its problem characters but if you know your way, it is unlikely you will run into trouble. I have endlessly wandered around the city and haven't encountered any problems even very far away from anything central. as said the center is impressive with excellent shopping possibilities. there is also the area of Pragerstrasse with lots of shops. The Grosser Garten is a very big park which I like a lot. The Elbe runs through the old city and the view is magnificent.

 

the city has a large Technische Universitaet. there is an excellent transport system with buses and trams. Leipzig is one hour away with fast train, Berlin is two hours away. The Czech Republic and Poland are also near as well as the famous "Saxon Switzerland".

 

I would very much live in Dresden if I had the chance. having a good job is also a must in my eyes, since the job market isn't the best in the area. and knowing good German. overall a great quality of life, and good place to be at least for me. i find the old city magnificent. this is not such a rich place as Stuttgart, Munich or Frankfurt and there are many DDR era plattenbauten. having been both to western places and to the east, the difference is easily recognisable. I don't know what your standards are what you mean by modern quality of life. dresden is a large city that shows its history, at least in my eyes. it is not berlin or hamburg however. you are in the east, and you can feel it.

 

I do not know how is the commute between Kreischa and Dresden. I only know of Kreischa because there is a huge Rehaklinik there, one of the biggest in Germany which cooperates with the Uniklinik in Dresden (also a very large hospital).

 

personally I commute over 2 hours daily where I am, but I use only train and use this time to do other things on my laptop. however if i could, i would spare it. I don't know how kreischa is, but I would get a car in such a place. I would probably prefer a cheap life there and go with the car in Dresden when I need something more. but that's just me. I don't know if this place has any other life apart from that klinik because it is literally extremely small. with 4434 inhabitants it is a village and I don't know how well foreigners would fit in that setting.

 

perhaps before you commit to anything you can visit and evaluate yourself.

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Posted

Thank You, Northtraveller. That was very helpful.

 

Commuting is something everyone does, and I figure I would have no problems eventually getting used to it if I live in Dresden.

 

"you are in the east, and you can feel it." This is the Schwerpunkt. I come from an ex communist country, and I have a hard time imagining that anywhere could be worse than here, esp. in a place like todays Germany. East or West. But what does it mean, you can feel it(I kinda think that there is not much for me personally to really "feel")? Much smaller salaries, are people different, or different to foreigners, something/anything big lacking compared to the West...? I don't know if this Theme is a taboo, but would I be missing something big if I ended up in a big city in the East like Dresden, compared to, well anything in the West that is not Muenchen or Stuttgart o.a. (gotta exclude those, giant cities are not an option for us atm.). Goal is starting and hopefully having a good career, fun is not a priority.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Posted

well it is a hard to describe the feeling and it is personal and subjective. I have been here for some time and can make comparisons but with great deal of subjectivity. it is just not that shiny as in the west, there is lots of communist architecture, it feels different than small tidy villages of Bayern or Baden-Wuettenberg. I guess not the traditional idea we have of Germany. But it is also much northern than those places and it would be different in any case. the city itself is a mixture of a grandiose old center close to the river, some Grunderzeit buildings and Plattenbauten. pictures change very quickly. a very green city too with many interesting things to do. I was in Stuttgart recently as I have also been to Munich and that was the west. Dresden has always felt like the east, in fact more than Thuringia where I live. the city also has some tourism, justifiable because it is amazingly beautiful.

 

yes salaries are lower in the east. the job market is also not very good. but for someone who speaks the language and has a profession which is in demand (for example doctors) there can be very good opportunities and in such professions salaries can be the same as in the west. Living costs can be lower. sometimes villages can be deserted or have people you wouldn't want to meet. as I told you about erfurt, there is nothing lacking and most infrastructure is shiny new or recently renovating. it is just different. and not so cosmopolitan, you need to speak the language. people are not so used to foreigners. foreigners are very much fewer although I suspect more in a place like Dresden.

 

I told you that this decision is subjective and noone else can take it for you. If you are expecting New York or a place like that, you won't find it in Dresden. If you are expecting a larger city with its own unique history and some contemporary life and you are willing to immerse in it, it is very good. Personally I would very happily live there (providing I had something to do), more happily even that Erfurt, which is a city I love. Most people I have taken there, are also extremely impressed with the old center, so much that word spreads and every new visitor wants that day trip to Dresden. we have been fours times there, and would go ten more without an extra thought. In fact every time i see that ICE next to my train with final destination Dresden, I am thinking I have to go again. Perhaps you should go before you decide and see for yourself.

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Posted

Hey there, Gandalf.

 

I live in Dresden, and I like it here very much.

 

To answer a few of your questions: the bus system here is very good. While I have never been to Kreischa, it looks like bus 86 goes through the village and can connect you to several different busses or trams that can take you into the city (check out dvb.de to get an idea of what is available). It appears that from the main Dresden train station to Kreischa it will take about 40 min using public transportation. It looks to be about 30 minutes commute if you are driving.

 

The city life in Dresden is very modern, don't worry about that aspect of it. The infrastructure is sound, and I don't really notice a big difference between East and West. I do notice a big difference between German and American, but that has been rehashed a million times on TT. There is probably also a big difference between Kreischa (small town life) and Dresden (bigger city life).

 

The difference between East and West is very nuanced (meaning very small)- it took me a couple of years to understand the difference, but though it exists it isn't so bad. Maybe statistically the pay is lower in Dresden. I haven't noticed because the cost of living is also lower here. As long as you make enough for you to be happy, then it doesn't really matter.

 

To give you some examples of how I feel that the East is different from the West- East tend to be extra practical. That means they (generaly) wear terribly ugly shoes and never nice pretty high heels (I assume its not practical to hobble around the cobble stones). They will ride their bikes through the most ridiculous weather to save 2Euro on tram fares. Of course this is not every single person in Dresden, and of course their are people who will ride their bikes in hurricane like weather all over the world, but I feel like this is more prevalent in the practical East.

 

There are other examples like this: but as I said the differences between the East and West are very nuanced, nothing to worry about. I refuse to ride my bike when the weather is bad, and I still wear high heels when I want to. Its actually not so taboo to talk about, perhaps if you voiced some of your concerns more openly, we could address the issues better.

 

Good luck with finding what you are looking for.

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Posted

Thank you people, I appreciate it.

 

Since you said it's not really a taboo, here are some facts. I come from a 3rd world country, completely ruined by corruption and nepotism, where in order to get a job as a doctor I would have to not only pay about 15000 euros, but also have connections in politics. I have a child, and I don't want him growing here, and we are leaving. It is much easier to get a job in east Germany for us, 3rd world country docs. Just simply running away from here is not the reason why we chose Germany. I could have gone anywhere, but fantastic education is why Deutschland is the choice.

 

Honestly, I never cared about those infamous differences. But so many people are mentioning them, recommending go west. It makes one start thinking what the deal really is. I spent 2 months last year in Munich, learning the language. Needless to say, very easy to fall in love with that city. But something like that is not what I want or need atm. Right now, I can't afford traveling to check some areas out. Nor will I be able to have a car when I move to Germany. Planning on coming for some Interviews by the end of the month. Not sure where they will all be, except Kreischa, hoping west, expecting east though.

 

I honestly don't know exactly what to ask any more. Cost of living-covered, lower in east. Salaries-covered, lower but not terribly. I'm guessing one can buy pretty much anything he needs in every big city, east or west. I passed my B2 language exam, but I am not fooling my self, I don't speak like a German, it is just a certificate, there will always be something I can't say or can't understand in near future/at the start. Maybe this is what matters: are there/how hard are the dialects in east Laendern, does the population speak English, are they friendly to strangers generally. And maybe, how are the shopping possibilities in east cities, maybe the size of Landshut or smaller, say 50 000 people. Bah, maybe it's a stupid question, I guess I wouldn't have to travel to Berlin for example, for anything other than basic, if that. But, would I die of boredom in such a place...

 

Thanks.

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Posted

You can buy anything you want in Dresden. It has all the typical stores (grocery, household items, clothing, baby, pharmacy) for a range of incomes (for example food from Netto has a limited selection, but it is cheaper than say Kardstadt which has tons of options, but is more expensive). In addition it has some specialty stores (asian, italian, american, russian, and indian supermarkets, hobby shops, trinket stores... really everything) and it has a variety of restaurants- some better than others. It has several cinemas (some that regularly show English movies), an opera, several theaters, art galleries, concerts, bars, clubs. Your village will likely have a supermarket and a few other small shops (most villages do) but Dresden will have everything else you need.

 

I think Germany-wide, but I know in the Dresden area for sure, there is a shortage of doctors so they are recruiting from other countries. However, the popular city hospitals are everyone's first choice, so you will probably get a small hospital in a village somewhere (like Kreischa or Pirna). I have several friends who completed their medical degrees in Russia, and now work at a hospital in Pirna. They commute from Dresden (they say to live in Pirna is to invite depression) and they enjoy their jobs and their quality of life here in Dresden. You may at some point encounter people who don't appreciate foreigners. There are hateful people all over the world, though, and I don't know that Dresden has more than any other place. You will find a greater amout of people who are interested in where you are from, think you have a cute accent, want to know about the spicy food from your country, and to have their stereotypes confirmed or refuted in a general interest kind of way.

 

There is a Saxony dialect. It can be hard to understand- even for native speaking Germans. It's either something you will get used to, or something that you can conspire with a nurse to decipher. The general population will not speak English with you. Many young Germans have some English knowledge, but probably not enough to explain how they feel (they can ask about your day, order food, the weather, but not more). Some of the older people will not speak a single word of English.

 

Good luck with your interviews, hope this helps you feel better about Dresden!

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Posted

I saw in your profile that you come from Serbia. In our area there are lots of doctors from Serbia. many speak adequate German, others don't. There is a shortage of doctors in hospitals in smaller cities, because naturally the best places in University or bigger city clinics are covered by German graduates. it depends also on the specialization. So smaller clinics have to get what they can find, even if German at B2 level (which is at the moment required to practise medicine in Germany) is not so adequate. Yes German is very difficult and most people will never speak like a native German does, but for a profession like medicine where you have to communicate a lot, you need to speak the language well. C1/C2 level is required to study medicine in Germany, so I don't see why it should be any different with practising it. There are talks of raising the requirement to C1 however, and I can see it happening if the expected flood of romanians and bulgarians (who from next year have unlimited labour access) materializes.

 

On a practical level, if the hospital needs you, they will be fine even if your german is not so good.

 

about east/west comparisons. it depends on what you comparing. if you are comparing with a less developped country, yes the East is good. Doctors in hospitals are not paid less in the East (at least for base pay, Dienste are differently counted in each hospital). Reha clinics are another issue which I cannot comment on, I don't know any doctors who work there. Realistically speaking, you won't have a problem in shopping or living in any place, even smaller one here in the East. perhaps there can be less variety in some smaller places, but you can also order online. However, what all people say, is that it is different from the West in many areas, mentality, wealth, cosmopolitanism, unemployment and so on. I live in the East, study here. I came consciously and I like it. I will probbaly stay for many years. But not to mention the difference is pure misguidance.

 

generally the type "young student under 25" of German speaks good English in the East. the rest won't speak much english, the smaller the place and the older the person, less likely. many people will speak russian, because that was taught in school in the DDR. But I have yet to see a German, speaking English to his doctor. In fact there are many people complaing that foreign doctors cannot speak German well and that there is a communication problem, especially older people.

 

I think we are drawing you the picture. your task is to decide whether you can fit in it. i decided I could and came to live here.

 

Good luck with your interviews

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