Dismantling ikea furniture

21 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi All

I am getting everything organised for leaving germany in a few weeks ( :D ) and I'm wondering whether it's worth taking apart the ikea furniture, bringing it with and then re-assembling it in my new place (in the netherlands) or if it will die once it's taken apart and therefore it's better to sell it? (my work will probably pay for a removal van, which is why it would be better for me if I can take stuff with me, rather than sell it and re-buy it at the other end). Does anyone have any experience of doing this? it's not the normal screws that are the problem, but those funny plastic things which you push into the wood, don't seem very sturdy or able to survive dismantling (if you're a veteran with ikea furniture you'll know what I'm talking about...).

cheers

MT

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Posted

The more expensive Ikeastuff survives 1 or 2 reassamblings, but those bits that are glued should be moved as they are. The stuff isn't build to last, but to be replaced every 2-3 years ;)

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Posted

If work is paying for a removal company, get them to pay for insurance too. Then if it doesn't survive you have the cash at the other end to replace it.

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Posted

Thanks! The reason for disassembling is that it's difficult to get it through the doorway otherwise. It's not the cheapest stuff from ikea but it's not high-end either, so I guess it's 50-50 if it will make it...

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Posted

HELP NEED, does anyone know (or could find out for me) an email or ph number for Ikea Germany, i need to order and have stuff in my basket but it won't let me put other things i need in it before i arrive in 4 weeks, will be going to a very cold apt if u have no duvet etc :( I have tried the yellow pages, infobel or whatever there called... thank you

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Posted

All websites in Germany are required by law to have this info. Look at the 'impressum' here.

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Posted

will be going to a very cold apt if u have no duvet etc

IKEA is not the only place in Germany to buy a duvet.

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Posted

Ok seems there is a ph number i can call, going to get my cousin to buy the 2 things i really need rest can be delivered..always something hey??...lol

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Posted

The Ikea duvets are a (bad) joke.

Just go to your local Karstadt in BH and buy yourself a Daunen-Federbett on the spot, e.g. this one.

They have that one in stock, I checked.


  • Karstadt
    Louisenstr. 91-95

    Öffnungszeiten
    Montag - Samstag: 09:30 Uhr - 20:00 Uhr

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Posted

...but Jesus - 129 EUR* for a bloody duvet - that's a joke too! ;) I personally just bought two or three of the (admittedly crappy) Ikea ones...still an order of magnitude cheaper! :D

(* "statt 299,00 EUR" :rolleyes: )

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Posted

The Ikea ones are 60% down and 40% feathers, 340g filling i.e. only 204g of down in there.

The Karstadt ones are 90% down and 10% feathers, 720g filling, i.e. 648g of down.

So, going by the down, an Ikea duvet with the same amount of down would have to cost 95.26€ (648/204 * 29.99€).

Still seem as cheap?

Additional arguments:

  • these Karstadt ones are made in Germany, while the Ikea ones hail from your present location.
  • the Ikea ones are made of duck feathers/down, while with the other ones, some in that price category are already made with the more expensive, not smelly goose feathers/down. Duck feathers have a strong smell.
  • the fabric of the Karstadt ones is better quality.

Do you want me to continue?

Try one of the proper ones and you will never go back to that Ikea c..p

You spend a third of your life in bed.

It doesn't pay to be cheap :D

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Posted

andyandy, you may also check out the wholesale store at the corner of Georgenstraße and Schließheimer Straße. I could go check out the price if you let me know the size and filling you require.

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Posted

@maas-y

Andy has moved to China.

But your heart is in the right place, maas-y, it's nice to see people offering to help :)

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Posted

@PandaMunich: lol! Although, for once, your usually impeccable calculations are somewhat off the mark this time. You have in fact underestimated my cheapness! The ones that I bought were somewhere around 4-5 EUR a piece IIRC (probably these). 100% synthetic, no animals were harmed in the making of, completely duck smell-free, goodness! I half-assedly sewed two of these bad boys together, rammed my Frankenstein creation into a decent cover, ignored my ex-girlfriend's regular complaints that feather duvets were indeed superior*, and it was perfectly warm. Many happy nights for under ten euros! :D

@maas-y: PandaMunich is indeed correct, and your Munich duvet wholesaler is outside my current shopping circuit. ;) But thank you for the offer of help!

[* I admit to discovering later that she was indeed correct, and so are you...and yet, here I am in China with another cheap duvet. One day, when I'm rich...!]

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Posted

I am getting everything organised for leaving germany in a few weeks ( ) and I'm wondering whether it's worth taking apart the ikea furniture, bringing it with and then re-assembling it in my new place (in the netherlands) or if it will die once it's taken apart and therefore it's better to sell it?

MuffinTop, as a veteran mover and owner of much IKEA furniture, I can vouch for the fact that some will indeed survive. Our Anebodas survived several moves, but our Malm Kommode did not. This is the fourth move since we bought a few of our beds, and only one is staying in Ireland because we fear it won't make it back.

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Posted

We dismantled our IKEA beds, dining table and desks successfully when we moved (within Germany). They were all kind of mid range - not the cheapest, but a long way from the most expensive. We looked at the bedside tables, chest of drawers and bookcases and decided that they probably weren't up to being dismantled (too many of those little plastic things). Instead we filled them full of clothes and taped them up and had no problems. We decided not to dismantle the wardrobe (too much hassle) and regretted it. That was the one thing that got damaged in the move and we had to dismantle it to repair it at the other end anyway. It was a pretty cheap wardrobe though.

If nothing else, moving brought home just how much IKEA furniture we've got. :lol: They're awfully convenient when you've got an empty flat to fill, though.

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Posted

The main factor is the hardboard backs that are pinned on, they need to be removed carefully. Otherwise it will all dismantle. Some of it should be taken apart before moving- the cheaper stuff may not withstand being shifted as a unit.

I always dismantle Ikea furniture before moving it any significant distance.

It amuses me to be in a culture where Ikea furniture is low end, cheap and nasty rather than good quality mid-range it actually is. And the ideas of permenance are different too. I don't equate "built-to-last" with being solid enough to survive three generations. Every 3 years is a low estimate of durability, our IKEA stuff is 3 years old and still going strong, and the stuff back in the UK has survived 6 years at least including 5 of several sets of tenants.

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Posted

If you spend the time to very carefully assemble it, then IKEA stuff will last a reasonable amount of time - for the price.

Equating that with good quality mid-range is a bit of a stretch. Mid-range furniture is not flat-pack. In fact, that's probably the first criteria in order to qualify as mid-range (in my book anyway). Mid-range furniture is not primarily composed of laminated/glazed fiber-board. Mid-range furniture does not require many dozens of screws to hold together.

We had a set of IKEA dining chairs. They were reasonable - certainly for the price - and lasted about 6 to 8 years. The problem was that once the joints became loose, there was really no good way to repair them. I took one to a friend of mine who was a custom furniture maker (really high end, bespoke stuff for famous people) and he tried a few different solutions, but none of them would last more than about 6 months. Short of re-building the entire chair, there was simply no way to repair it. Compare that with a properly made chair, like he would make, which actually had been built in such a way that repairs are surprisingly easy.

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Posted

Note for the future that Ikea now has a lifetime refund policy for most items.

Therefore if you're moving a long distance, you can take your used furniture back, get a refund*, then buy new stuff at your next location.

No need to bother moving your Ikea furniture (well apart from to the store!).

* Sadly only works if you have the original receipt and was bought after 25/08/2014.

linky: Ikea Germany guarantee

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Posted

"Ikea furniture" is a bit vague - Ikea has a wide range of prices and quality which would all stand up differently to moving. The more expensive stuff is of better quality and stands a better chance in a move.

One thing I have managed to do is to rebuild one of the cheap 4-door Ikea wardrobes using dozens of angle brackets instead of the weird screw system that MuffinTop was talking about way back when.

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