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What kind of job do you have in Germany?

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Posted

Hello everyone, first time poster here.

I am a recent college graduate from the U.S., living in Germany for the year. I have a B.A. in German and English, have lived in Germany several times, and I'm looking for a way to make it my permanent home. I have tried the teaching English route, and it is just not for me. I am looking more in the direction of International Relations, Business, Economics.

However, I wanted to hear from those of you who are Americans living in Germany. What kind of companies, orangizations, and businesses do you work for? What kind of positions are Americans sought out for? What kinds of skills\positions are there for an American in the German work force? What degree did you have to help you find work in Germany?

I am considering getting a M.A. in International Relations in the U.S., but would like to know how useful this would be in Germany.

I would love to hear your stories!

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Posted

Native English speakers with few qualifications have an easy time getting into patents administration. But it is very, very boring. And difficult to escape once you're in.

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Posted

Native English speakers with technical backgrounds, perhaps, but not with B.A.s in humanities.

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Germany is currently looking for IT Specialists, experienced engineers, certain skilled trades, and German-speaking healthcare workers. Germany has more than enough humanities grads of their own. Native English speakers without technical skills usually teach English.

Let me turn your question around, what would you like to do with a degree in international relations?

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Posted

Some work in IT (employee and freelancer), because they have the matching skills and don't need German (only nice-to-have). Some work for the army, freelancers also work as an English teacher/translator, because it's relatively easy to get a visa for that. English teachers have all kinds of different backgrounds.

I really doubt whether International Relations will be useful here. It's like European Studies, a bit of politics, a bit of economics and some languages, but nothing really solid. I think with Economics you have the best chances, but if your German is good enough, why not do it here? Much cheaper as well.

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Posted

Thank you all for your replies.

I definitely realize that a humanities degree is not so useful here, which is my motivation to look into ways to gain a useful, tangible skill. I am not expecting to find anything here with a B.A. in humanities without any real qualifications. A Masters in International Relations appealed to my interests because of the combination of politics, business, and economics. I pictured a degree in International Relations would help me to find a job in American-German companies and\or other international companies, such as AmCham, BASF, Siemens, Daimler, Bosch, etc.

I'm still at an intial stage in researching these options, so I appreciate the answers very much. The reason I'm tempted to do a program in the U.S. is because I am familiar with the univeristy system there, and most obviously, the language. Though I have strong German language skills, the idea of studying business and economics in German, frankly intimidates me. However, if a U.S. degree is useless in Germany, getting a Master's in Germany is an option I would consider. I was wondering if any of you here have been able to find a job in Germany with a degree from the U.S.

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Posted

I was raised with English tea and the only way I drank it was when a cookie came with it.Hated tea with milk in it. :o

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Posted

You might be able to work at German universities if you do a higher-ed-administration degree (with a focus on international relations in higher ed). But I can't imagine a US international relations master's would get you very far here in business, unless you also have the fundamental business training as well. Do you speak a language other than German and English?

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Native English speakers with few qualifications have an easy time getting into patents administration. But it is very, very boring. And difficult to escape once you're in.

Excuse the ignorance but what is patent administration and where would one pursue this type of job?

I was raised with English tea and the only way I drank it was when a cookie came with it.Hated tea with milk in it.

Then make sure, when you visit Britain, to ask for "Tea with NO MILK please." I always forget and always get it with that bloody cow juice in it - init!

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Posted

If your language skills are as good as you say and you're a people person, you might consider a career in HR. Several companies I work with are currently beefing up their HR departments in preparation for the coming "war for talent" as the German workforce ages. There are graduate degrees in Human Resources, or you could do psychology, sociology, or even business.

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Posted

I have a degree in German. I taught English in Germany for many years until it became unprofitable to do so.

I now translate from German into English from home. But I did gain the Handelskammer translation qualification about 10 years before I started using it. And I've always enjoyed the act of translation. Ever since my first language class at school.

But although I now earn the same freelance as I would if I were an employed translator, it's still relatively little compared to management jobs.

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My then very young daughter asked me what I did for a living..I answered " I talk to people and I get money ". :D She found that cool! Now she´s grown up, got a degree and working on a ´Masters and looking for a job...

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Posted

Hello everyone, first time poster here.

I am a recent college graduate from the U.S., living in Germany for the year. I have a B.A. in German and English, have lived in Germany several times, and I'm looking for a way to make it my permanent home. I have tried the teaching English route, and it is just not for me. I am looking more in the direction of International Relations, Business, Economics.

However, I wanted to hear from those of you who are Americans living in Germany. What kind of companies, orangizations, and businesses do you work for? What kind of positions are Americans sought out for? What kinds of skills\positions are there for an American in the German work force? What degree did you have to help you find work in Germany?

I am considering getting a M.A. in International Relations in the U.S., but would like to know how useful this would be in Germany.

I would love to hear your stories!

As you probably know, one of the biggest challenges you face is getting a company to sponsor you for a work visa. I'd work on your written and spoken German if I were you, rather than just pinning my hopes on a degree. If you want a business career, get a business degree plus work on perfecting the written and spoken German. International relations might touch on political economy but nothing that a technical economist would need.

In business, take a look at finance or sales careers and see if they are for you. I'd advise you away from finance because there are likely to be fewer good finance jobs in the future for non-quants, but if you have good sales skills there will always be a place for you somewhere as long as you have the language skills.

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Posted

i have 2 degrees in Humanities...but have worked in IT the last 25 years.

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Posted

Munich needs a Satellite Man... :unsure:

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Munich needs a Satellite Man... :unsure:

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Posted

@ Piggy - can you train somebody, and does it have to be a "man"?

Me? Jill of all trades

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Posted

I teach English at a state school here. I have also done translations in the past, but found that boring. I have other English native-speaker friends that do stuff with import-export in various companies. One of them has a Bachelor's in Business, the other only an "Ausbildung." The one with the degree makes better money so that might be the better option.

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I'm a physicist. That's what I wanted to do since I was 5, I'm 40 next birthday.

Need to study very hard. It helps to be smart (I'm not). Work very hard. Travel a lot (I hate it).

Work is fun and spend time with good people.

I don't believe there is a profession that for the same amount of study pays you less.

Best time of your career is after you retire, so they make you honorary professor and you still enjoy work (never mind no salary) but don't have to do boring admin meetings. Well, this is what I'm told.

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Posted

Excuse the ignorance but what is patent administration and where would one pursue this type of job?

Patent administration is secretarial with a few legal knobs added which you can pick up as you go along. Applying for and maintaining a patent is a lengthy and complex procedure. If you are bright and can read you can learn on the job and work up to do a lot for patent attorneys, who deal with the legal and technical side of getting a patent. The European Patent Office is in Munich. Patent attorneys apply to the EPO for patents on behalf of industrial clients - more often in English than in any other language. The patent attorney does the legal and technical bit and his secretary does all the (complex) administration.

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Posted

I pictured a degree in International Relations would help me to find a job in American-German companies and\or other international companies, such as AmCham, BASF, Siemens, Daimler, Bosch, etc.

I doubt any of them would be interested in a fresh grad with an M.A. in International Relations for whom they'd need to sponsor a work permit.

In another thread (I don't remember where anymore) someone posted a link to a very interesting Spiegel article. ´

Statistiken zeigen, dass 70 Prozent der Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaftler nach einem bisweilen schwierigen Start doch noch eine passende Stelle finden. Drei bis fünf Jahre können bis dahin allerdings vergehen.

Foreigners, however, don't have 3 -5 years to look for an appropriate position.

The reason I'm tempted to do a program in the U.S. is because I am familiar with the univeristy system there, and most obviously, the language. Though I have strong German language skills, the idea of studying business and economics in German, frankly intimidates me.

Yet you want to work in a German office environment? The language skills you'd need for non-technical roles is generally much higher than those that you'd need to study here. If you are serious about a career in Germany, I'd strongly recommend that you study here in German.

However, if a U.S. degree is useless in Germany, getting a Master's in Germany is an option I would consider. I was wondering if any of you here have been able to find a job in Germany with a degree from the U.S.

I don't think an American degree is useless. There are many Americans with degrees in IT and engineering who have good jobs. However, without really good technical skills, there are only limited options for Americans who need to be sponsored for a work permit (especially those who have no interest in teaching English freelance).

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Posted

I work for an ad agency, specifically in performance marketing and behavioral advertising. As it's Internet-based, 50% of my role is heavily IT and analytic based. So, I agree that some IT knowledge really opens doors in Munich as it is the publishing hub. There are many opportunities to work in-house or agency-side as long as you have this knowledge.

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I utilize a GUI interface to access HTML code stored on servers around the world, and convert this into readable text. I also use the same GUI interface to insert text, that is then converted to HTML code and transferred back to these servers.

I actually said that when asked what I was working on, in one of our weekly meetings. It took the project leader a few minutes to realise that I was describing surfing the internet.

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