What British popular culture is liked by Germans?

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Posted

Hello, I'm looking at teaching jobs and to help prepare I'm just wondering if the people who have lived here a little longer than me know of some examples of British popular culture that are also well-known here in Germany. And, hopefully, generally liked! By any age. Either music, film, tv shows, comedians, books... anything really! I'm really just looking for a bit of common ground in this area. All info/ examples/ links appreciated

Thank you

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Posted

I reckon they like any of the Hugh Grant movies. About a Boy, four weddings etc!

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Posted

Also TV adaptations of romantic novels by by Rosamunde Pilcher and Katie Fforde shown on Sunday evenings prime time ZDF.

Lots of stately country homes, lovely gardens with tea parties, fast cars, beautiful people falling in love.

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Posted

Off the top of my head:

Mr. Bean was huge over here - even more popular than Black Adder (probably because it didn't lose anything in the dubbing process).

Everyone knows James Bond, obviously.

Parents will know about Shaun the Sheep and Charlie and Lola because they're aired on Die Sendung mit der Maus (the latter dubbed; the former doesn't need it).

The Julia Donaldson/Axel Scheffler collaborations are very popular over here, albeit in their translated versions.

Music will vary with tastes, but everyone knows Queen, Wham/George Michael, Pet Shop Boys, etc.

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Posted

My missus likes Fawlty Towers and anything involving Cath Kidston.

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Posted

Mr Bean.

And Shakespeare. More Shakespeare productions in Germany every year than anywhere else.

The Queen and all those funny uniforms.

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Posted

Harry Potter. EPL. A lot of the Germans have a favorite English soccer team.

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Posted

Mr. Bean, Robbie Williams, One Direction :wacko: , Harry Potter, The Beatles (still).

For a certain audience: the Royals and Rosamunde Pilcher.

ManU, Chelsea and Minis.

A lot of Germans are also crazy about all things Scottish, from shortbread to music to the dialect (which IS sort of cute).

If I was you (which I'm obviously not) I'd rather try and introduce something different. (Bring Rugby to Germany!!)

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Posted

The Queen and the Royal family generally. I did a Royal Wedding themed lesson when William and kate were getting married (one of the beauties of it was that you could adapt it to teach almost anything) and I reckon that was one of the most effective lesson plans I've used.

Mr Bean - I'm not very keen on Mr Bean so I tend to steer clear (can't get up any enthusiasm) but Germans love him.

More advanced students love Fawlty Towers, especially The Germans. (I wouldn't use it for beginners, you've got to have a fairly good grasp of English to work out what's going on).

Slightly surprisingly "Allo, Allo". Germans, especially younger Germans love "Allo, Allo". Although I've never used that for teaching, too risky. They'd probably end up speaking English with a bad French accent!

For younger students, any English language pop songs. If they're teenage girls George Michael seems to go down well. They can all sing "Last Christmas" and "Careless Whisper" in perfect English and usually provide an accurate translation. It's not so difficult to extend this to other songs.

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Posted

There are germans, like me who like:

-Whiskey from Scottland, espicially single malt

-Monty Python is known and liked by some people

-Pop songs are know and liked

-James Bond of course, but who in the world doesn't like James Bond?

-British soccer teams

-We like how england is doing in penalty shootout :P

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Posted

Does fried Mars count?

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Posted

Hi Andi30,

-We like how england is doing in penalty shootout

Don't mention the score! :-)

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Posted

Sherlock Holmes? I mean it's not that current, but there is Sherlock.

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Posted

Football hooliganism...

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Posted

Inspector Barnaby, Inspector Lynley, Inspector Lewis.

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Posted

Hi Andi30,

Don't mention the score! :-)

I am just honest! :P

Ok last time Chelsea has beaten Bayern Munich in penalty, maybe it is now over.... :lol:

If I would be vicious it would mentione:

-Gareth Southgate / Andi Möller 1996

Oh damn....I did it!!! :ph34r:

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Posted

Oh.. and Germans are always disappointed to hear that the English do not always have afternoon tea at 4 o'clock (even when they're at work) and are horrified and saddened to hear that they use tea bags.

So you could make some scones and stuff and take them in to class with you - and ask them to bring a flask of tea with them. Then provide butter and raspberry jam as apparently raspberry jam is more traditional than strawberry.

P.S. Bara brith (or tealoaf) goes down very well, too. I used to do a fair bit of baking for classes.

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Posted

I think the idea of the full English breakfast is well known in Germany but its normally greeted with immense hostility. "Bacon, sausages, beans and egg? Give me a brötchen with some nutella instead!"

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Posted

Oh.. and Germans are always disappointed to hear that the English do not always have afternoon tea at 4 o'clock (even when they're at work) and are horrified and saddened to hear that they use tea bags.

So you could make some scones and stuff and take them in to class with you - and ask them to bring a flask of tea with them. Then provide butter and raspberry jam as apparently raspberry jam is more traditional than strawberry.

P.S. Bara brith (or tealoaf) goes down very well, too. I used to do a fair bit of baking for classes.

Ah no, we know that has changed, it is seen in the movie: "Asterix and the brits".

It was they reason the brits lost against the romans :D

I am kidding.

But I can recommand an english teapot made from sterling silver.

Since we have it we only use that teapot and the tea is much better :)

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Posted

Ah, but the kinds of Germans I used to teach are, unfortunately, not the kind (or age) that would read Asterix.

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