Pancake problems and other challenges

55 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi everyone!

 

I've been having some trouble with German ingredients. I'm from Canada, so I don't know if the flour here is different from ours. Whenever I try and make American style pancakes, they don't turn out right. They're doughy and flat. I've used the same recipe in Canada many times, and they always turn out fluffy and perfect.

This is the recipe I use:

http://www.marthastewart.com/318689/best-buttermilk-pancakes

 

I've tried tweaking the recipe by adding more flour, but that hasn't helped.

 

Also, my favourite cookie recipes haven't been working either. They never keep their shape when they're supposed to.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions?

 

Thank you!

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Posted

I personally haven't had a problem but, yeah, the flour is slightly different and German baking powder is single action as opposed to the double action used in N. America.

 

What's the number on the flour you used to make them? Does your egg carton say M or L on it?

 

Also: cookie advice

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Posted

That's pretty much my recipe as well and it works just fine.

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Posted

I made some yesterday and been making them for years no problem. I use various recipes, but never had a problem other then when I screwed the recipe up.

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Posted

I do a lot of cooking but I haven't baked in Germany much because of all the problems. My pancakes come out like crepes and any oatmeal or chip cookies come out hard and heavy. Your Martha Stewart recipe looks OK just remember to double the amount of baking POWDER called for in Canadian or American recipes. #405 flour seems finer and more like cake flour than standard flour in the US. Maybe #550 would work better. With pancakes, buttermilk usually works better than regular milk. I'll have to try some more of these recipes and see how it comes out.

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Posted

Pancakes and waffles; always seemed to be off. The problem is the baking powder; it's not the same as what I use to get in the States. After many trials and errors with US recipes and German baking powder, I gave up and got a friend to bring some over on a visit. I haven't tried the recipe posted above, but I imagine it works because it uses twice the amount of baking powder that a typical US recipe uses. I doubt simply doubling the amount will work for all you baking needs, especially for those recipes that rely on double acting baking powder; most German brands are single acting...no aluminum salt...therefore no secondary rise when heated.

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Posted

 

#405 flour seems finer and more like cake flour than standard flour in the US. Maybe #550 would work better. With pancakes, buttermilk usually works better than regular milk.

The flour is definitely finer,so you need to go by weight, not volume. You can find some useful conversions here: http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml

I can see where the buttermilk would help in the pancake recipe; because of its higher acid content, you'll get a better reaction from the baking powder.

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Posted

Here is a recipe for making your own baking powder (North American version). Easy enough. Cream of tartar is Kaiser Natron in German.

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Posted

Wrong.

 

cream of tartar = Weinsteinpulver (not Weinsteinbackpulver)

 

baking soda = Natron

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Posted

 

baking soda = Natron

 

Wrong

 

baking soda = Natrium :rolleyes:

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Posted

Or just buy a big box of Bisquiq.. I've seen it some German stores, so its not like they don't carry it..

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Posted

The butter here is the biggest problem I find while baking. I think on TT someplace someone talked about the butter and since I have reduced the amount of butter I use in my recipes and my baking is much better. In cookies I use 1/2 the butter that my American recipes call for.

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Posted

 

Baking challenge. Go into a German supermarket and ask for Natrium. Watch their reaction. They will look at you like you have three heads. Now ask for Natron. Reaction will be much more positive. Buy Natron (= baking soda) and go home and bake your muffins.

 

I'm laughing my head off here, Natrium = Bicarbonate of Soda so I got it wrong as well.

 

Apparently, the other half tells me germans use to use Hirschhornsalz but have not of heard of it.

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Posted

Natron = baking soda OR bicarbonate of soda OR sodium bicarbonate. All the same thing. Natrium is sodium, only a part of what makes up baking soda.

 

Hirschhornsalz is sometimes still used in Christmas cookie recipes here. I've used it on occasion.

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Posted

 

Here is a recipe for making your own baking powder (North American version). Easy enough. Cream of tartar is Kaiser Natron in German.

 

Yes, for "single acting", but typically what you get in North America (Clabber Girl, Rumford, etc) is "double acting" which is baking soda, cream of tartar, (cornstarch as filler) and a high-temperature acid salt such as sodium aluminium sulfate, sodium aluminum phosphate and sodium acid pyrophosphate.

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Posted

 

Or just buy a big box of Bisquiq.. I've seen it some German stores, so its not like they don't carry it..

 

pshh in some stores...look where me and the poster live. I am lucky if I can find fresh spinach somedays, and normally can't. Though wouldn't mind some bisquiq but I am not paying the outrageous internet prices for American stuff.

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Posted

Well, 2 of the places i've seen it in are Tegelmann and Karlstadt.. Last I checked, they are all over Germany.

So go out, find your local outlet and have a look.. I know, I know, that would actually require

you to get off your computer and actually leave your house... But trust me, thats a good thing :)

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Posted

Some people just plain take pride in preparing their own pancakes. That's what ingredients are for.

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