Finding work on Sylt

18 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi

I am looking into the big move. My boyfriend lives and works on the island of sylt all year round. If i am to move there i was wondering what the chances are of me finding work are,when my German is minimal/non existant.

I am qualified in care which could be useful?!

I currently work in engineering as a document controller and fully qualified secretary. Neither of which i can see being much help without the language. I do intend to learn German but this is taking time. Has anyone any ideas on how to go about getting a job.Even if it is a part time job, it just needs to not be seasonal unless it is seasonal for the winter.

Would work off the island and a commute be a more fesable idea?

Any advise welcome

Thanks

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Posted

From expierence Sylt is real dead during the winter months. Sorry to say but German will be a necessity especially in such a closed enviroment as an Island. Commuting could work but the question would be to where since there is absolutly positivly nothing near Sylt. The next major city is Flensburg and they have their own unemployed issues.

Health care might be an option but you will still need to communicate with your patients.

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Posted

Since your boyfriend works on Sylt, surely he is in a better position than a bunch of total strangers, to help you find work there - he could tell his friends and colleagues all about you, and sooner or later somebody will say "oh, I think I have found a job for your girlfriend".

You say you are "qualified in care" - care of what? dogs, horses, children or old people?

If it is care of children, you might be able to find work in a kindergarten or something, helping to teach basic English.

I think that particularly on an island, it's going to be a case of "not what you know, but who you know".

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Posted

Ah, Sylt, nice Island, have fond memories of that place (esp seeing as that's where I first met my my husband ;) )

Would work off the island and a commute be a more fesable idea?

A lot of Sylters do exactly the opposite, quite a few locals have left the island because they can't afford to live there anymore and commute from the mainlaind to work, there's not really a lot of options on the mainlaind near Sylt, you could always try looking for work in Niebüll, you might have better chances there than on the island itself

If you work in care, you could try some of the Kurhotels / Kurheime, but without German, it will be tough (unless you're willing to work as a chaimbermaid - which is what I did in one of the Kurheime on Föhr when I first arrived in Germany to learn German)

Sylt is pretty much dead in the Wintertime (not quite as bad as the neighbouring islands Föhr and Amrum, but mostly jobs there are seasonal

Good luck in finding work there, I really miss the North Frisian Islands, they're amazing (but can get depressing during the Wintertime, I'd still love to go back to live there though.)

I think that particularly on an island, it's going to be a case of "not what you know, but who you know".

Yep, that is definitely the case.

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Posted

A lot of Sylters do exactly the opposite, quite a few locals have left the island because they can't afford to live there anymore and commute from the mainlaind to work...

I watched a recent program on German TV (NDR3?) about the Sylt where wealthy outsiders were buying up property as an investment which was worthwhile due to steadily increasing prices (they didn't mention possibility of the bubble bursting).

The result being that locals are being forced out & as said above move to the mainland & have a not-so-nice commute. This results in village shops (even supermarkets) having few customers (particularly out-of-season) that they give up and sell with the result that more houses are built which the locals cannot afford. Vicious circle. There are plenty of shops - those selling expensive handbags etc. Must be worth their while.

I've only been to Sylt once - many years ago. Flew myself & a colleague in a motorglider - had an interesting encounter with an F-4 phantom jet near Leck... We always found Föhr to be nicer but again its years since I've been there.

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Posted

I watched a recent program on German TV (NDR3?) about the Sylt where wealthy outsiders were buying up property as an investment which was worthwhile due to steadily increasing prices (they didn't mention possibility of the bubble bursting).

The result being that locals are being forced out & as said above move to the mainland & have a not-so-nice commute. This results in village shops (even supermarkets) having few customers (particularly out-of-season) that they give up and sell with the result that more houses are built which the locals cannot afford. Vicious circle. There are plenty of shops - those selling expensive handbags etc. Must be worth their while.

Unfortunately, this is currently happening on Föhr too, I have many good friends there still and they are all unhappy that the island is becoming "versyltet", I can see this happening on Amrum in the years to come too :(

We always found Föhr to be nicer but again its years since I've been there.

I think so too, I lived there for a few years before moving to Flensburg, I spent a lot of time visiting friends on Sylt too, but always loved going "home" to Föhr. Finally made it back to the Föhr in July 2011, planning another visit this year.

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Posted

Thanks for the responses. Really not an easy task. Obviously i have my boyfriend searching for jobs. The thing is when he moved there he had finances in place picked up german really fast and had several degrees and and spoke many languages. unfortunately i dont. I have experience in care of the elderly not children unfortunately even though i do have kids. I was just wanting ideas mainly off other people who had been in similar circumstances. Work in that area seems to be a real issue especially trying to live off the wages. Guess waiting and hoping something turns up is the only real option and learning German in the meantime..

Thanks again

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Posted

I have experience in care of the elderly not children unfortunately even though i do have kids.

Even unskilled positions caring for the elderly require German. Although there are not enough workers in this field, it is also poorly paid and you’d probably have difficulty supporting a family on one.

How old are your children? Educational support for non-German speaking children could also be an issue on the island.

Is there anyway that your boyfriend could move somewhere closer to you?

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Posted

My Children are aged 6, 8 and 10. This again is something i have thought of even though i dont think they will take long to pick up the language.

Carework is a last resort really just thought it may have been a more feasable idea.

Ideally id like something in engineering which is what i work in now but language would be even more of an issue.

My boyfriend could move but he would never settle in England and dreams of moving to Norway

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Posted

In view of the TV program I saw I would have some doubts about your being able to find any school on Sylt. They seem to be closing (except for high-priced Internats for which there always seems to be takers).

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Posted

My Children are aged 6, 8 and 10. This again is something i have thought of even though i dont think they will take long to pick up the language.

The 6 year old shouldn't have much of a problem. However, don't expect it to be very easy for the 10 year old. I strongly advise you to read a few threads on the educational system in Germany starting with What teachers say to kids....

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Posted

My gent's ex-wife is from there and when he was first over from Australia, he worked in a bike repair shop.

Since then, he's got a actual career far, far away for Sylt and from his ex-wife (hooray - Sylt is like Norfolk without nice people or decent supermarkets for me, it is just BLEAK).

Sorry to be very blunt, but why the hell are you and your kids making all the compromises? Has he got a magic cock or something?

Please use the TT search to read up a bit on what you are considering.

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Posted

As Irish Lassie pointed out, many Germans live on land an travel to Sylt for work every day.

I think you have better chances to find a job on land. A compromiss could be that you and your husband live on land (maybe Niebuell) and he travels to Sylt to work and you work in or around Niebuell.

If you really want to go to Sylt you can try the rehab clinics there.

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Posted

My gent's ex-wife is from there and when he was first over from Australia, he worked in a bike repair shop.

Since then, he's got a actual career far, far away for Sylt and from his ex-wife (hooray - Sylt is like Norfolk without nice people or decent supermarkets for me, it is just BLEAK).

Sorry to be very blunt, but why the hell are you and your kids making all the compromises? Has he got a magic cock or something?

Please use the TT search to read up a bit on what you are considering.

Thanks for your honesty, life is full of compromise. No decision will be taken lightly by myself when it comes to my kids and this is a fact gathering mission. Unrelated to genitals. Our circumstances are testing but a decision that is right for everyone will be the right one. Where ever and when ever that will be.

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Posted

The 6 year old shouldn't have much of a problem. However, don't expect it to be very easy for the 10 year old. I strongly advise you to read a few threads on the educational system in Germany starting with What teachers say to kids....

What an awful situation don't think I would have dealt so well with someone speaking to my children like that. Deffinately food for though there thanks

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Posted

Sylt is like Norfolk without nice people or decent supermarkets for me, it is just BLEAK.

I guess it all depends on the person, but as I mentioned before, I think Sylt is a lovely place and I don't find it bleak at all.

One of the main problems with Sylt is all the old rich people in their fur coats who moved there and push the prices up, and Westerland itself isn't really the nicest spot on the island (unfortunately, it's also probably the only place worth checking out if you're looking for work)

During the Winter months though, the islands are no place to be if you're unemployed and alone, it can be quite daunting if you're stuck at home on your own and depending on the weather you can actually be literally trapped on the island.

Islanders can be very wary of strangers and although they are friendly, it's not easy getting "in with the crowd", having said I found once I got to know the locals, I actually enjoyed Winter a lot, once the tourists were gone home and the islanders are amongst themselves again, night life was great, but back then I was young, free and single and had no obligations, obviously things would be a bit different now.

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Posted

We lived on Sylt for 10 years when our kids were small. They went to kindergarten and I would pick them up at lunchtime and go straight to the beach for the afternoon, fab! The schools were good too. It was a great experience, so much better than in the UK. We had to learn German fast as there are not so many Brits on Sylt. My husband still works on the island but we moved to the mainland a few years ago and he just commutes, no problem at all. If you have got any questions etc just get in touch, I`d be happy to help if I can. Anna

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Posted

Thank you for your response. I have a couple of interviews lined up this week but still struggling with the German. My children seem to be picking it up really quickly though so that's nice. Not over here perminantly yet though. Will see what the job interviews bring. How did your children adapt to the island and the German? How old we're they? Beth

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