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German-friendly dessert for a dinner party

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Posted

I got invited to a dinner party this coming weekend.

"What can we bring?"

"Oh, how about a dessert?"

"OK"

 

pooh.

 

In the states I considered myself a good cook, but my confidence here has been rattled. On a several occasions I've take my home-run dessert recipes from the States and made them here, and when I take them in to work they sit in the kitchen all day and I end up taking some home. In the States these desserts wouldn't have made it to lunchtime.

 

My conclusion is that my US recipes are too sweet and/or rich for the German pallet.

 

So now the dinner party. I would like to bring something really nice, maybe a little fancy. In the US that might mean a cheesecake or something, but I'm worried here that people wouldn't be able to handle the fat/sugar.

 

In a little bit of a panic, I'm trying to figure out a way to bring three desserts to increase my odds of a winner, but three cheesecakes seems a bit much. Maybe a plate with three types of cookies? But cookies haven't always been popular at work. In perusing the forum I found a suggestion about lemon bars and I think this is a good idea. I've thought about brownies and ice cream...this is nice because if you don't like brownies at least there's ice cream. Maybe makings for banana splits? Theses last two are also nice because they have a bit of an American bent to them.

 

Some of you who've been here longer must have figured out over time what has a high rate of success. What's your go-to dinner party dessert recipe?

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Posted

I think the idea that the typical US dessert is too sweet is right; I hardly know anyone outside the US who likes stuff that sweet.

 

So, you could do a cheesecake, but use a recipe that isn't too sweet.

 

That may not be the kind of recipe you're used to or feel comfortable making at all. Then try something totally different.

 

In my experience, tiramisu is always a success. Lots of coffee powder on it and loads of alcohol balance out the sweetness.

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Posted

Brownies, chocolate chip cookies, cupcakes, and muffins are all popular right now.

 

You could also make a fruit pie, like apple pie.

 

I have made pumpkin bread and also zucchini bread, which most of the Germans I know really enjoyed, and they are so surprised to have those 2 ingredients in a sweet dessert.

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Posted

I've had success with pineapple upside down cake, apple pie, hazelnut pound cake, lemon chiffon cake, chocolate chip cookies, chocolate chip muffins, brownies, pumpkin cheesecake, and 3 citrus cheesecake. I don't think I've had anything bomb, but then I guess I make most of those things more rich than sweet - too sweet does seem to be a problem for some Germans.

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Posted

Half or even third the amount of sugar, and make something where its obvious what it is.

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Posted

how about tiramisu? we find it a German-friendly dessert.

and it's easy to make.

 

or chocolate mousse served with fresh fruit slices?

 

easy peasy is Rote Grütze you can take along some cream to serve with it.

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Posted

I second something like Tiramisu or a mousse dessert. I've also made a sort of trifle that goes over very well - lady fingers or pound cake cut into pieces and layered with tinned mandarin orange sections or sour cherries, vanilla pudding and whipped cream.

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Posted

I recently had Bananas (or is it Banana's?) Foster with a group of friends in Austria as a dessert. We all had a nice time enjoying it. Only about one banana and one thing of vanilla ice cream. I believe there was dark rum used as the sauce. It had a nice blue flame when it was served. The person who prepared it mentioned how easy it was and it was not expensive. There might have also been some butter, but I don't recall.

 

Might be worth looking into.

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Posted

Trifle has always been a success for me in the past using fruit out of a tin including the liquid (use apricots or mangoes with less added sugar) - poured over sliced pannetone, and covered with a layer of thick custard - which I improvised using a blend of vanilla pudding and marscapone. One time I was in a real hurry I bought a cheesecake from the bakery and topped it with Rote Grütze.

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Posted

A german friendly dessert? More fucking silverware then...

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Posted

Dead right about the too sweet thing, as an example, next time you get a chance, try a slice of Linzer Torte (not actually German, but popular here none the less) - you will notice that most of the sweetness comes from the jam filling, not the sugar added to the pastry. But if we're talking about commercial, mass produced cakes and pastries that are available in the average Backstop/Backstube/Backpoint then cakes and pastries will be just as sweet as anything Brits or Americans are used to.

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Posted

Second Rote Grütze, but serve it with real custard, not 'pudding'.

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Posted

Every place I worked the people swear by my brownies...I am pretty sure that was one of the main reasons my contract got extended. :)

I make mine with cocoa powder because I am too lazy to melt chocolate, and leave them a little undercooked, gooey is apparently where it is at. I get nothing but raves on my brownies. Simple to bake too...I need to bake a batch soon, gotta keep my job secure. :)

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Posted

 

But if we're talking about commercial, mass produced cakes and pastries that are available in the average Backstop/Backstube/Backpoint then cakes and pastries will be just as sweet as anything Brits or Americans are used to.

 

That's not correct. An American cheesecake is far sweeter than the German equivalents.

 

Germans generally don't eat desserts and after a large main course are unlikely to want anything too large, filling or fancy. I would suggest something simple, creamy and German like Bayerische Creme. Most of them probably won't even be expecting a dessert.

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Posted

Another vote here for a soft mousse/cream-type dessert, perhaps including fruit, instead of cakes, muffins, pies etc. For some reason, soft desserts feel more "manageable", less filling and "food-like" after a rich meal although they may be as rich as baked stuff and this is why your average German prefers them as desserts. Cakes and things are seen as kind of separate "meal" in its own right, for example in the afternoon with a cup of coffee.

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Posted

It must be a regional thing, because here they don't seem to have a problem with sweet, with lots of creamy torte available in cake shops. But these are afternoon things, not after dinner.

 

They do have cheese cake, but it's more the baked variety (Kaese Rahn Kuchen).

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Posted

Here is a small recipe

 

Vanilla Icecream

Walnuts

Cointreau

 

Put the icecream in small glasses, like the one that you´ll get along with an espresso in some cafes.

Add pieces of walnuts on top

Pour a little bit of Cointreau on it

Add a coffee spoon.

 

You can bring the glasses and spoons yourself or make a suprise and use whatever they got.

 

Salted pistachos do not mix well with some liquers, if you want to take another combination of icecream, nuts, dried fruits and liquer, you should try it out first at home.

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Posted

 

It must be a regional thing, because here they don't seem to have a problem with sweet, with lots of creamy torte available in cake shops.

 

Sure, but sweet as they are, they are still a lot less sweet than American cakes and desserts. Cream is only sweet if you add sugar to it.

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Posted

I thought it was was British thing, but someone else mentioned it, so why not make Trifle? If you use German Götterspeise and Pudding and unsweetened whipped cream youll be well on the German side of sweetness. My Germans are always very keen and you can make it "grown up" by adding alcohol to the viennese fingers - Either traditional sherry or amaretto or Obstler anything else.

 

i tgenerally use Himbeer or Erdbeer Götterspeise and add in some mixed berries too.

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Posted

Lots of suggestions, and IMO it is impossible to determine the German-friendliness (lol) of a dessert. The sweetness tolerance varies – I find many German shop-bought cakes and desserts too sweet and always reduce the amount of sugar by 1/4 to 1/3 in recipes. Actually, most desserts like various creams, mousse au chocolat, tiramisu are too much for me after a rich meal, and I just eat them because they are put on the table. Give me an espresso and a tiny piece of good chocolate, and I'm happy. Something fruity like Rote Grütze is nice, but more in summer when you have a variety of fresh fruits. The ice cream combination by Siskebap sounds not bad either. The guests might not want to eat the dessert right after the main dish, but a little later.

 

I think the OP could stick to the original plan of bringing brownies and/or lemon bars (3 different types of dessert is definitely too much work). The latter are not so well-known, and the former are interesting when baked after an original recipe and not by the help of Dr. Oetker Backmischung. I've got an American recipe which is not too sweet (also with cocoa), including the instruction that the brownies are supposed to be a little chewy (not overbaked).

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