A&F (Abercrombie and Fitch) Rant and Rave

A & F Sendlinger Tor   43 votes

  1. 1. Shopping in A & F

    • Too Loud
    • Too Dark
    • Too Smelly
    • Never shopped there / No opinion
    • I love the place
    • I would like it better if i could see
  2. 2. Walking in Sendlinger Tor

    • I am aware of the smell or sound
    • I hear the noise
    • Doesn't bother me / No opinion
    • Who cares
  3. 3. Do you notice when someone walks past who has been in A&F


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16 posts in this topic

Posted

Anytime I go into Munich town centre I am now always aware of Abercrombie & Fitch.

Not because of any wonderful advertising but more their product placement.

How do I mean product placement, well the fact (no arguements on this...it really is a fact) that within I would estimate at a range of 150 metres, their perfume makes it's self well and truly known.

The amount of perfume necessary to create this (personal opinion here) stink, must get into the level of bucket loads per day.

Along with that, tiny pockets of the stuff come at you from nowhere as someone with a bag of clothes walks past.

I defy anyone to buy an article of clothing and not have to hang it outside or wash it before wearing.

Hmmmm I guess i had better adjust that. I am sure some people actually like the smell, but for me, it has worn my nasal passages out.

Before you ask, yes I own a piece of A&F clothing and have been into the store. Apart from the fact that I wouldn't wait outside just to get in, when I am inside, it's dark, loud and smelly and not in that Kunstpark Ost friendly end of night way.

This is a rant and a small rave, but I am very interested in seeing who actually agrees with me and why.

I believe that in Hamburg, the store is no longer allowed to emit this stink because people complained.

Thanks for listening

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Posted

Hm, I don't own anything by A&F, only the younger, hipper types where their distressed clothes. I also haven't noticed any smell from them, perhaps because my nose is already numb from walking past Lush?

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Posted

I don't like the smell and I wouldn't buy a thing in a shop that is as dark as my wardrobe - with doors closed!

However I have to admit that the whole place is amazing from a marketing perspective.

No big signs, not even a neon company logo. No products in shop windows. Still - people queuing to get in and everybody knows about the place. From a marketing and sales point of view this is just amazing, isn't it?

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Posted

right, not that this place really bothers my life, but just my opinion as you asked ;-)

loud music and the smell gets on one's nerves (had to go as visitor of mine needed to buy sth for her son). still, the noise and smell stay inside, have never noticed anything passing by. Lush is really worse, it smells meters away when passing buy.

the attempted american friendliness with "hi guys, how is it going?" (and employees saying it & not paying attention to use it in singular when appropriate) is just ridiculous and out of place somehow.

but i have to agree, they must have a great marketing

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Posted

The smell is someone's reason for disliking Abercrombie? That's a new one for me.

See, back in my school days, along with the nerds and stoners and headbangers and skaters and jocks and what not, there were the preps - the kids who by virtue of having rich parents were naturally superior to everyone else. Yes, it was all very Breakfast Clubby. Anyway, they shopped at Abercrombie and Fitch. So owing to my held-over teenage bitterness and, yes indeed jealousy, I will forever despise that store. I know exactly who these Münchners are who are lining up to get in. The same ones who wear scarves in warm weather and pack the latest trendy bar, which is so crowded that you can't move and plays generic pop remixes at volumes way too loud to allow any sort of conversation - i.e. a place that can only be enjoyed by people for whom impressing others with their appearance is paramount.

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Posted

A and F is out of fashion in the U.S. and closing stores while opening new ones in Europe and Asia trying to establish new markets.

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Posted

Yes, it's stinky, dark, and loud. Surprising that an overrated American mall store is worthy of generating 4 threads where TTers usually come to the same ultimate conclusion, again and again.

post-74394-13590273824921.jpg

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Posted

I'm always amazed that people buy the crap that these "designer" brands produce.

A&F clothes look idiotic with all the foolish patches and random tears, and bleaching on them. Why someone would wish to walk around in an item of clothing that almost looks like a second hand industrial service uniform (except it's a poor attempt) is beyond me.

Please bring back the good old days when people wore clothes without labels on them.

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Posted

I have to say, I where a&f clothes. I like the style. (I buy the non torn and worn out stuff most of the time.) But I have never stepped foot in the Munich store. I refuse to stand in line for this stuff. When I go visit my family in the states I will buy more clothes. Its crazy to me to see these people standing in line. I want to know how long the hype will

Last so I can go on and browse.

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Posted

A and F is out of fashion in the U.S. and closing stores while opening new ones in Europe and Asia trying to establish new markets.

This.

Abercrombie is heavily marketed towards tweens/13-year olds who want to emulate what they think 18-23-year olds look like, how they act, what they wear-- and how they imagine that age group's sexuality acts out. In the U.S., it was an overpriced (for the quality) brand that you thought was the epitome of cool/hip when you were 10-14, you were indifferent about by 16, and would be blatantly embarrassed to be seen wearing/setting foot in by 18. Clever marketing actually: aim at 18-23 year olds who will not buy your stuff in order to sell the dream to teens and pre-teens. If you can scalp some of the older age-group that isn't in touch with what is currently hip (or recently became "cool" while actually being a few years too late)... bonus.

For instance, years ago they drew criticism for selling thongs (the underwear, not flip-flops) to 10-14-year olds printed with words like "eye candy." They briefly sold t-shirts with caricatures of Asian people in a laundry with the words "Two Wongs can make it White." Both pissed off a lot of people.

Now that Abercrombie is floundering in the U.S., they're heading out into the world where they don't have this strange pseudo-sexual, pre-teen, high-price/medium quality brand identification-- and they can re-angle as high demand, luxury brand in luxury retail locations, with, and this is kinda funny, a literal (done for marketing purposes) doubling of prices for comparable items to those sold in the U.S.

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Posted

And it seems to work here... everytime I pass by (ok, it is on saturdays) there is a queue. And what I also find it amazing is that everyone that leaves the store has a bag - so people are not just having a look but actually buying heheh.

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Posted

If only those idiots who buy this overinflated crap would work in their factories for a day <_<

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Posted

The artificial queue outside is part of the marketing strategy. A friend and I went there a couple of months ago out of curiosity and after queueing for about 10 minutes were allowed past the semi-naked men guarding the entrance/flirting with the tweens. The shop was more or less empty and there was definitely no need for a queue except to use it as an advertising device for people walking past outside. After adjusting to the darkness, we had a quick look around, doubted we could pull off being taken seriously in any of the clothes, reminisced about our youth, and left empty-handed after a few minutes. It was fun! :)

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Posted

The artificial queue outside is part of the marketing strategy. ...

Yeah, I've seen that in every city I went to. I also was directed to this article about how they only market their clothes to thin people.

Teen retailer Abercrombie & Fitch doesn't stock XL or XXL sizes in women's clothing because they don't want overweight women wearing their brand. They want the "cool kids," and they don't consider plus-sized women as being a part of that group.

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Posted

My daughter is 24 and thinks A&F is only for teenies. She was asked if she wanted a job there and so I said, "Well, it's nice to be asked dear". She then said that she thinks that anyone tall and athletic-looking gets asked.

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