Internet data transfer rates

13 posts in this topic

Posted

Good afternoon and a happy New Year one and all,

I've had a bust up with Kabel D because their transfer rates are all over the place and you can't work reliably with that sort of connection. I'm now looking for a new provider and don't want to encounter the same problem again, so I'm hoping some experienced teccy will throw light on the subject and perhaps recommend a company in Berlin without that problem.

My own research has come up with "O2 DSL M Professional", a combined internet/landline flat and it looks interesting. My question is: whatever O2 uses to carry data, will it be stable or will it vary like Kabel D's? O2 Sales swears blind that this never happens. Can I take them at their word?

I'm also open to other suggestions.

Advance thanks to anyone kind enough to spend time on this.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Well for starters CATV/Cable Internet is a shared medium.. You share the avail. bandwidth with all other people

on your mainline trunk cable. If 1 or more of those people are internet leeches and download stuff 24x7, then your

speeds are going to suck.

This is why I tell people not to touch CableTV based Internet. You will almost always never get the speed your

paying for. Stick the DSL, Each DSL line is a Point-to-Point link between you and the DSLAM head-end. The only

parts that are shared is the back-haul, which are usually some very large pipes. This guarantees you the speeds

you pay for.

-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

In other words, make sure you don't live down the street from Darkknight:

Last year I managed to download around 7.8TB (7,817,144,750,507 MB) or around 21GB a day (21,416,834,932.89 MB)

just shy of 1GB an hour.. The rest of ya are just jealous that I keep my Linux DVD/ISO collection so complete and updated ...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Except I am sure even (especially) DK takes his own advice and does not use cable.

-2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

DSL ... guarantees you the speeds you pay for.

Oh dear.

-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I am on DSL.. Last month i managed 2.1tb alone.. Those Linux ISO Images have sure gotten bigger :-)

-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi everyone,

Thanks a bundle for the input. Thank you especially Dark Knight - that's exactly what I'm experiencing. Sometimes the connection is slow, I feel I'm reminded of my very first computer experiences, sitting there wondering: Is this a slow connection or has the computer crashed.

No-one seems to have any views on O2. Schade.

Thank you for your views. At least I know I've done the right thing with Kabel D. With them, working from home is nightmarish if you're in a hurry.

Cheers

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

This guarantees you the speeds you pay for.

Not really, since the whole Internet is a shared medium. As you say the speed of your connection to the DSLAM is quite stable, especially if you are not on the far end of the useable twisted pair length. Then the backhaul is under the providers control, so it will be as good as the provider wants it to be, but after that it is all shared medium to the remote site. My connection here in Germany is 16mbit DSL, and I usually get a good percentage of that bandwidth most of the time. My connection at my residence in California is by cable and I pretty much get my full bandwidth all the time, since it is a well managed cable system. If the OPs cable connection is constantly well below it's specified bandwidth it is because of poor management by the cable company. A well managed cable system will either add nodes or disconnect bandwidth hogs, or both, whatever is appropriate. Is there some regulation here in Germany that prevents cable suppliers from disconnecting bandwidth hogs?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Thanks Traunstein, please somehow get the message to Kabel D.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Unfortunately I'm an engineer, not a magician.

I use Deutsche Telekoms 16Mbit ADSL, and am quite satisfied with it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi, I have O2 DSL 16 MBit, but only get between 9 and 12 MBit. It is quite stable within that range. However, I don't live in Berlin (but Bavaria) and as I was explained your speed depends on the distance from the exchange serving you and on how many others are sharing your exchange. If you want higher speed you might want to go with LTE - technology rather than ADSL. And to be on the safe side I would only sign up for a contract which can be canceled with 1 nonth notice.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi jeba,

Thanks for the input. O2 themselves said to me there would be fluctuation, but nothing like as severe as I am experiencing with Kabel D (in Berlin). However, I checked their service qualities and they don't seem to be up to scratch.

I've now plumped for easybell on recommendation. Their service is supposedly better and they're not wildly expensive - they seem to be new on the market and keen to get new customers. Sales promised there would be minimal fluctuation, but they would, wouldn't they! The advantage is that I have 30 day notice if things go terribly wrong.

Just to be on the safe side, I'm keeping my fingers crossed - maybe that'll do the trick!

Cheers

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

you might want to go with LTE

Bad Advise...

1. LTE is a shared Radio communications channel.

2. The Backhaul from the LTR base station is still shared with all connected users

3. LTE is only avail. in certain areas of Large cities, not all over.

4. Most, if not all providers have limits on what you can/can't do/access

5. Most, if not all providers have bandwidth and download limits..

Real Options for OP:

1. Switch to DSL. Speed also depends on how far you are from the exchange, but is still better than LTE or Cable.

2. If you really want some dedicated/highspeed lines, then get a business class SDSL line or even better an E1/Fractional E3

However expect to pay thru the nose for both depending on provider and location.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now