Pensioner receiving UK state pension

57 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi

My wife and I have been living here for a few months now and are receiving the UK state pension. We are staying with friends and finding money a bit tight. I would like to know whether we can apply for benefits to top up our income? We own a house in the UK and would like to know whether the jobcenter or benefits department would take our home into consideration and point blankly refuse to grant us benefits?

Does anyone have any ideas?

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Posted

We own a house in the UK and would like to know whether the jobcenter or benefits department would take our home into consideration and point blankly refuse to grant us benefits?

Yes, they would. They would (rightly) consider the house an asset and, as SpiderPig suggested, tell you to sell it and live off the proceeds.

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Posted

Thanks all for the replies,

1. If I decide to sell the house, then this would obviuosly take time, what would happen in the meantime?

2. If I refuse to sell, then will they just refuse to help? or would they make me sell the house by force?

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Posted

How did you manage to make it to Pension age?

or are you trying for the "Dumbest user of the week award"

A 1... You would get deeper in debt and piss your hosts off even more...

A 2... read the question,,, and think... go on, think!

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Posted

You don´t say exactly why you want to stay in Germany, but quite honestly, how do you feel about foreigners moving to the UK in order to be able to claim welfare, get free housing, schooling and health care? Personally, I find it quite distasteful!

So, that said, how do I feel about somebody trying to make a life in Germany, whilst having a house in the UK, and asking if they can claim benefits here because "we are finding money a bit tight"?

You have assets, (have you thought of renting out the house, rather than selling it?), and you might be able to work here (it is not unusual for pensioners to work these days!), but as has already been strongly suggested, why not just go back home?

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Posted

Spiderpig - that was really rude, theres no need to swear.

I asked for advice, as everybody else in this forum is doing - giving advice and helping people. I did not expect to be sworn at.

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Posted

Rule No. 1 - In Germany - everything is different.

Benefits are on a separate contribution basis on the whole.

You pay (statutory) uninsurance contributions - you get statutory unemployment pay.

You pay (statutory) pension contributions - you get a statutory pension.

And so on.

If you turn up in Germany as pensioners then you are not going to get any German pension

- and I doubt very much that you would qualify for the minimum pension given to those

with no or low contributions.

What are you doing about health insurance?

Maybe for UK pensioners emigrating to Germany there is some arrangement.

As a Brit who worked here before retiring (and who gets the full UK state pension)

I have to pay a goodly sum to a Krankenkasse each month.

(I would pay nix if I lived in the UK).

They (TKK) pay for everything though.

If I was uninsured the ops. I had last year would have set me back EUR 30,000 ...

Basicly, robinson100 is correct - remember your UK state pension buys you quite a

lot just now in Germany because of the Euro problem (you get around €1.20 per GBP).

If this is solved and the rates changes to what is was before - say €1.05 per GBP,

then you would really feel it!

Currency exchange rates are not set in stone - which is why, as a Brit pensioner here,

I have a small business to top up my income as needed.

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Posted

Hi

I understand what everyone is trying to say and I have no intention to "scrounge off the system" I have been working for over 50 years and have paid all my taxes (in the UK of course). I have just found myself in a situation where things didn't work out and now am wondering what to do. Sometimes in life things don't go the way you plan, and so I am in a situation where a little advice would be appreciated.

My health insurance is covered by the UK as I receive state pension.

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Posted

jeremyhay - just out of curiosity - what small business do you have? I have always wanted to run my own business.

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Posted

If you'd like to find out more about the welfare system in Germany, I suggest you read some of the many threads on Hartz IV, as it is known locally.

But as was mentioned above, the benefits are means-tested - you are expected to have exhausted all available means of supporting yourself before any requests are approved. The authorities will sometimes let you live in a property you own if it is deemed appropriate (that is, not excessively large by the state definition), but they will not let you keep a house that you are not living in.

Good luck to you.

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Posted

Does the UK really cover your health insurance outside of the UK if you have permanently moved?

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Posted

Yes, as long you get only a UK pension.

For details, open the section "Receiving a UK state pension or long-term incapacity benefit" on this NHS page.

If you also get a German pension and live here, you'll not only not get health cover via the NHS in Germany, you will also have to pay 8.2%+2.05% (or 2.3% if you had no child) of your UK pension for German public health and nursing insurance, if you happen to be a member of public health insurance.

For details please see post no. 8 in Health insurance in early retirement .

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Posted

If you have a house in UK why not find a tenant and use the rent to live on. If you use the search box you will find plenty of threads on how to do that.

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Posted

Like others have said, the freedom of movement within the EU grants you the right to move around the EU to live and work but not necessarily the freedom of drawing benefits. If you had come here as a job seeker and would try to go on benefits because you can't find a job, they would most likely tell you to go back to your country. It isn't that long ago that they excluded EU job seekers from going straight on benefits.

If you are over 65, you would not qualify for the Hartz iv benefits because you are considered to be retirement age. There is some type of help available for retirees but I do not know if you qualify for that being a newcomer, never having worked in Germany. You can read something about it here: http://www.berlin.de/imperia/md/content/batempelhofschoeneberg/grundsicherung_hilfe_fuer_rentner.pdf?start&ts=1256136646&file=grundsicherung_hilfe_fuer_rentner.pdf

If you qualify, it looks like they'd give you 351€ a month, your wife 90% of that plus rent and heating but you may not own anything worth more than 3200€ between the two of you and you must prove that none of your children are making more than 100,000€ a year.

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Posted

you must prove that none of your children are making more than 100,000€ a year.

That number is actually a common misconception that is spread around the internet and that has even made it into some DRV literature.

The number 100,000 stems from the 15-year-old BGH decision XII ZR 98/04, and refers to the total assets of the child (socalled Schonvermögen), not to their annual income.

Income of the children can be garnished to a net Selbstbehalt of 1250 Euro plus Unterhalt for own children and certain deductions, e.g. 5% of gross income for private pension planning etc.

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Posted

I would like to know whether we can apply for benefits to top up our income?

I understand what everyone is trying to say and I have no intention to "scrounge off the system"

TBH it sounds very much as if this is the case. The enthusiasm amongst the taxpayers on TT hält sich in Grenzen...

The number 100,000 stems from the 15-year-old BGH decision XII ZR 98/04, and refers to the total assets of the child (socalled Schonvermögen), not to their annual income.

However, most people with a job, house, car etc will easily have assests well above 100,000.

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Posted

I suspect that this 100,000 thing is to stop parents handing over all they have to their kids, whilst still living, in order to 1) claim benefits, and 2) avoid paying inheritance tax.

Not sure if this is the case with the OP, but without a bit more background to the OP's motivation to stay in Germany, rather than in the UK, I really don´t think we can give him/her any more useful information than has already been given.

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Posted

Some links I have found state that you can make up to 1600 a month before you are asked to pay for your parents, see http://www.olg-duesseldorf.nrw.de/behoerde/presse/Presse_aktuell/20121205_pm_Ddorfer-Tabelle-2013/Duesseldorfer-Tabelle-Stand-01_01_2013.pdf

However, may not even be relevant to them because they may not have children. There is really not enough info here about their situation.

If you have a house in the UK, why not live in the UK? Why move in with friends in another country where money is tight?

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Posted

I have no intention to "scrounge off the system"

Intention my arse, because that's exactly what you're going to do. Why should the Germans support someone who's never paid a fucking penny into the system?

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Posted

Although I share the sentiments expressed by most of the previous posters, I won't add them here, enough has been said already on that topic. You're in a tight spot and want to know what help Germany offers. None. No one will force you to sell your house, but you could be "forced" to leave Germany and return to the UK. What concerns me a bit more is this bit:

My health insurance is covered by the UK as I receive state pension.

Are you sure about this? Anyone resident in Germany needs to have German-approved health insurance and, AFAIK only those on holiday here or seconded temporarily are covered by UK health insurance.

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Posted

If money is tight then rent out your house and then get a small job, assuming that you have learnt German in your months here.

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