Sidewalk snow removal

37 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi,

I'm new to this forum and just came to Frankfurt about a month ago to be an Au pair. My host family is gone this weekend, and I didn't see them this morning before they left. My host mom left me a note saying that I needed to shovel our sidewalk if it snows. My question is: What do I do with the pile of snow at the end? I'm from the countryside in the states, so we just push the snow from our driveway into the grass. Since I live in a residential area, that's not a possibility.

Thanks for your help!

Ann

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Posted

Hi Ann and welcome to Toytown.

When clearing snow it's best if you avoid accumulating piles of snow at the end all together.

Most people clear their section of sidewalk by pushing the snow off toward the kerbside edge of the sidewalk.

If the sidewalk is too narrow to allow it to remain there then you could push it in to the gutter, but you must be careful not block any drainage gratings.

Enjoy the fun - keeping fit and warm!

2B

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Posted

What do I do with the pile of snow at the end?

You collect it all in a sack take it into the house and use it for mixed drinks, smoothies, slushies, or anything that requires crushed ice. Leftovers can be keep in the freezer for up to 3 months.

One word of caution, if the snow appears yellow discard it.

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Posted

Dump it on your neighbor's sidewalk right after he has cleared it.

Seriously: Do not shovel it into the street. You can leave it along the sides of the sidewalk (house or street) as long as a cleared and sanded/gravel-strewn pathway of 80 to 120 cm breadth allows two pedestrians to pass each other comfortably without having to step into snow over their ankles/knees.

Die Verhältnismäßigkeit gilt auch für die Frage: "Wohin mit dem Schnee"? Vom eigenen Grundstück darf nicht einfach der Schnee auf die Straße geschippt werden. Die Verhältnismäßigkeit erlaubt hingegen das Schippen vom Gehweg auf die Seite des Gehweges, wenn der freigehaltene Streifen angemessen groß ist, so dass zum Beispiel 2 Fußgänger passieren können. Dafür reichen im allgemeinen 80 bis 120 Zentimeter (Oberlandesgericht Bamberg Az. 5 U 46/75). Nach Ansicht des BGH (Az: III ZR 8/03 vom 9. Oktober 2003) muss auf Fußwegen nur ein schmaler Streifen von 100 bis 120 Zentimetern frei gemacht werden muss. Es muss mithin ein rutschfester Gehweg vorhanden sein, der es erlaubt, dass 2 Personen gefahrlos aneinander vorbeigehen können.

Mehr hierzu bei: http://www.finanztip.de/recht/a/streupflicht.htm#ixzz2EZ686KdY

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Posted

One word of caution, if the snow appears yellow discard it.

What if it's brown?

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Posted

If it's brown, she should leave it down. :lol:

Btw, be different and build a snow woman they're cuter.

post-14005-13550640805483.jpg

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Posted

Back in the UK I used to go to the local grit bin and use the grit as intended and made an effort to keep my area of pavement cleaned. Being a nice person, I used to enjoy it.

The slew of "Health and safty" myths (you'll get sued if you clear snow and blah blah) that the papers generated in order to make the obnoxiously lazy feel OK about their selfishness and inaction used to upset me.

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Posted

The slew of "Health and safty" myths (you'll get sued if you clear snow and blah blah) that the papers generated in order to make the obnoxiously lazy feel OK about their selfishness and inaction used to upset me.

What is not a myth is if you clear snow and someone slips then you are at fault,however if you don't clear and someone slips then it is determined to be an act of God.

Whereas in Germany it is the other way round.

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Posted

Ignore sarabyrd and push that snow to the road, just like everyone does (including professional snow cleaning services).

I don't care about what she copy/pated, practicality and common sense should prevail. Since you have to do this yourself, I assume this is a residential area and the pedestrian path is not that wide, so if you do it in the way that link suggested, it will be OK the first couple of days, but if it continues snowing you are building a long "hill" along the pathway and it will get wider and wider the more snow you throw in. That snow hill then will convert into ice and it will be pretty much indestructible until the weather gets a bit warm and it melts by itself. If you have a car and a driveway, you should keep clear the whole part where the car enters your property (no snow accumulation, no "hill"). Because once all that snow converts into ice it will be pretty difficult to drive the car in and out.

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Posted

My host mom left me a note saying that I needed to shovel our sidewalk if it snows.

If that is all the note said, just do your very best and don't worry about it.

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Posted

What is not a myth is if you clear snow and someone slips then you are at fault,however if you don't clear and someone slips then it is determined to be an act of God.

Whereas in Germany it is the other way round.

Actually, that is indeed a myth, and probably the myth the previous poster was referring to.

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Posted

Can anyone confirm that this law of clearing your pavement applies to all houses whether in cities, towns or villages or on any particular type roads?

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Posted

Our neighbours scrape the snow down to a 2-millimeter thickness then polish the remainder to a high gloss which produces a festive twinkle under the street lights. I've never noticed any excess snow so I presume they ship it to less fortunate towns to decorate their Christmas Markets.

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Posted

Can anyone confirm that this law of clearing your pavement applies to all houses whether in cities, towns or villages or on any particular type roads?

Every city has its own ordinance regarding clearing the snow.

The only exceptions are in the city centres where the city employees do the clearing but then invoice the house owners for it.

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Posted

Actually, that is indeed a myth, and probably the myth the previous poster was referring to.

According to that article you linked it is only not a myth since 2010.

Sorry not lived in UK since 2000 so wasn't aware it had changed.

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Posted

According to that article you linked it is only not a myth since 2010.

Sorry not lived in UK since 2000 so wasn't aware it had changed.

It hasn't changed, it's been clarified.

Before you could, theoretically, be sued if you negligently cleared snow, eg by doing something stupid like pouring boiling water down which froze and someone slipped. Simply shoveling up snow, or using the grit bins put out for public use, did not put you at risk of legal action.

This situation became so oversimplified to the point of untruth in the public conscious. In practice there was no risk of getting sued for clearing a pavement.

It was a myth based on a distillation and distortion of fact, but still a myth.

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Posted

Ignore sarabyrd and push that snow to the road, just like everyone does (including professional snow cleaning services).

Ignore the Federal Supreme Court decisions, it ensures a life full of surprises.

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Posted

It hasn't changed, it's been clarified.

Before you could, theoretically, be sued if you negligently cleared snow, eg by doing something stupid like pouring boiling water down which froze and someone slipped. Simply shoveling up snow, or using the grit bins put out for public use, did not put you at risk of legal action.

This situation became so oversimplified to the point of untruth in the public conscious. In practice there was no risk of getting sued for clearing a pavement.

It was a myth based on a distillation and distortion of fact, but still a myth.

Just reread the article and

''There’s a feeling that health and safety culture has got out of control in recent years and it’s time to get the balance right. People need to know it’s extremely unlikely they will be sued for helping the community and clearing snow from the pavement and that Government is on their side.'

That to me does not mean you cannot be sued.

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Posted

Ignore the Federal Supreme Court decisions, it ensures a life full of surprises.

Reality will still prevail. If they start fining people for not shoveling snow according to your specs they will have to fine several million people, so I am pretty sure nothing will happen. Plus after a couple of weeks of snow, there is literally no space to pile it, you end up with multiple giant piles of snow ON THE ROAD in your street.

I don't even know why I am discussing snow shoveling with someone who probably never shovel snow in her whole life and who never lived in a house on a small neighborhood street.

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Posted

I don't even know why I am discussing snow shoveling with someone who probably never shovel snow in her whole life and who never lived in a house on a small neighborhood street.

I wouldn't bet on it.

post-4788-13493284152988_thumb.jpg

(view from my window in Milbertshofen)

post-24869-13552544969395_thumb.jpg

Because I no longer live in an apartment on a corner lot where I was the only one who felt responsible for clearing 50 m of sidewalk and strewing the gravel as well.

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Posted

They did the house opposite us with a very loud motor snow clearer that sounded as loud as a chainsaw at 4.50a.m this morning. I was not best pleased. If they do that tomorrow I will call the cops.

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Posted

I wouldn't bet on it.

Well remembered, Panda. I was pregnant at the time, so it was 23 years ago, but man did I shovel!

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