Non EU students at German Universities

25 posts in this topic

Posted

Hi there,

 

I have looked through the site but couldn't find any previous information on this. A friend of mine would like to study at a German university but has just found out that she needs to have €8000 in her account before she can begin.

 

My question is: is this really the case? Is there a way around this?

 

Maybe some non EU student out there would know.

 

Thanks a lot,

 

Daniel

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Posted

Where is she from? How is she planning on financing her studies? Did you already read the wiki?

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Posted

It was (is) true for non-EU students. I needed a 'blocked account' with a minimum of 8000 Euros per year. A way around it is a scholarship enough to cover all cost of living or a sponsorship from a German citizen.

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Posted

Thanks. That would be a pity if it is true.

 

She is Russian, and would finance her studies by part time jobs I think. Thanks for the TT wiki link, I had forgotten to look at that.

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Posted

She doesn't have to apply for a 12 months long Aufenthaltsgenehmigung. 6 months for 4000 euros would do the trick, then apply again for 6 months. It implies more paper work, but reduces the amount of cash retained.

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Posted

 

She is Russian, and would finance her studies by part time jobs I think. Thanks for the TT wiki link, I had forgotten to look at that.

 

If she is planning on financing her living expenses via part time jobs, she should re-think that plan. I don't know if there are still limits on the number of hours a student can work, but if she is going to be studying in a language she has not studied in before, most likely she's not going to have a lot of time for part time work.

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Posted

Students are allowed to work part-time up to 20 hours a week, but it was my understanding that that is based on being able to qualify for public insurance.

 

Also, yes, you have to have a Sperrkonto (frozen account) with 8000 euro, per year that you are planning to study/or for as long as the visa is that you apply for. As someone said, another option is a Bürgschaft, or sort of "sponsorship" from a German citizen who can prove that they would be financially capable and willing to support you, should you need it.

 

Edited to add that the working limit was changed in the last few months, which has definitely been discussed on other threads, from 90 full days or 180 half days, to 120 full days or 240 half days.

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Posted

20 hours a week of work during the semester sounds to me like overdoing it, especially when studying in a foreign language.

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Posted

Yeah, I would tend to agree, but it is what the set maximum is. I'm only working around 10 hours a week, sometimes more depending, and it can be a lot of pressure to get everything accomplished. You've gotta pay the bills, though... <_<

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Posted

all students need that, even EU ones to get a Freizugigkeitsbescheinigung. I guess financing via part time jobs is not realistic unless you find a very good one, which pays well with few hours. Also not speaking the language perfectly, means you have to devote more time than normal getting your things for uni done.

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Posted

Thanks for all the feedback. Incidentally, she did German at university in Russia, and from having spoken to her quite a bit, I think she could handle the language/part time work side. Unfortunately the money is the barrier. Oh well, cheers again for the tips.

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Posted

another option is 8 000 Income and showing the bank account statement.

she can work 120 days right?

 

so it makes 960 hours.

 

960x8,50€=8160€

 

(8,50 € is the lowest salary in Munich)

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Posted

Last year I was getting my student visa so here is some first hand info:

 

Before she can think about studying in a German university, she needs to prove that she knows sufficent German to be enrolled in school. She needs to pass the DSH exam. Visas are granted up to a year for her to prepare and pass this exam and depending on the circumstance can be extended but from what I know, you better make that year count. In this year she must prove that she is in DSH prep courses or that she is in language schools. Being as she is from Russia it might happen that she needs to book her courses in advance and prove that she paid for them before a visa could be granted and that could affect how long her visa is valid. For example, my Filipino friend in school had to book courses from A1 all the way to B1 in advance, pay for them all, and since it was only 6 months her visa is only valid for 6 months. Different cities have different rules. On top of that she has to be in school for 20 hours a week. Believe me, they will reject her paperwork if it is 16 or 18 hours (thanks Herr Meyer ugh). In addition, she would need to prove that she would not be financially unstable for the duration of her stay. 8,000 euros is one way to get a visa but that is for 1 year. There are also other alternatives. She could have a German citizen sign documents stating that he/she would take financial resposibility for her. What he/she would need to qualify for this is:

*A job in which he/she is no longer on probabtion

*A job with a contract that would not end during her stay

*Enough monthly earnings to support both the signer and her (varies from city to city but my co-signer makes 1,900 euros for reference)

*At least 3 months of paycheck stubs

*At least 3 months of bank records

 

They will not assign her a visa without having the money or a co-signer. With a student visa you are only allowed to work a 400 euro job so she would not be able to support herself. They are very strict about that so she should not even attempt to work under the table. I luckily had help from my boyfriend so I really wish her luck since I know how hard it is to get one. Best wishes!

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Posted

 

... With a student visa you are only allowed to work a 400 euro job ...

 

That is not true, with a student visa, you are allowed work the maximum allowed no of days / hours. You are allowed to earn as much as you can.

 

You are allowed to, but if you are not making quite a bit more than 400, and are 'family insured' with a gesetzliche insurance company, it might work out cheaper to just earn the 375 - 400.

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Posted

The student will need 8000 EUR in a special account that is blocked and only give back the money in monthly installments. Or someone willing to sign a contract taking full responsibility for the guest, such contract is called a Verpflichtungserklärung for a student and the sponsor (the person signing the contract) can be living either here in Germany or back home and must have enough income to support the guest, i.e. if the sponsor is single with no kids he will need a net monthly income of around 1900 EUR.

 

Students can work but the number of hours is very limited, part time for 90 days a year, extendable to 180 days a year if you show it won't interfere with the studies. But coming to Germany and expecting to finance your studies with your own work is pretty much unrealistic in the first year. The only think you have to throw in to make this pretty much impossible is that the person will be living in Berlin.

 

P.S., Can the student go straight to the University? Or is the person required to do the one year Studienkolleg? For which he/she will have first reach German proficiency B1 or B2 depending what you want to study.

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Posted

Thanks for the info. She studied German at University in Russia, and going from speaking to her, I am pretty sure she is between C1 and C2. She won't be in Berlin. Money seems to be the main problem.

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Posted

 

Students can work but the number of hours is very limited, part time for 90 days a year,

 

They increased it in August, but it's still not much.

 

 

Edited to add that the working limit was changed in the last few months, which has definitely been discussed on other threads, from 90 full days or 180 half days, to 120 full days or 240 half days.

 

 

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Posted

 

Thanks for the info. She studied German at University in Russia, and going from speaking to her, I am pretty sure she is between C1 and C2. She won't be in Berlin. Money seems to be the main problem.

 

You still have to check if her high school degree from Russia is accepted as equivalent to the German Abitur otherwise she will have to go one year to the Studienkolleg first. If she studied at least 2 years in a Russian university that is recognized in Germany then she can skip the Studienkolleg and go straight to uni.

 

And it is good that she speaks German but she still needs a piece of paper proving it, she will have to do the B1/B2 test. After taking the test, the results take 6 weeks.

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Posted

 

And it is good that she speaks German but she still needs a piece of paper proving it, she will have to do the B1/B2 test.

 

Are you sure of this, Krieg? It certainly used to depend on the university. I studied briefly at Freiburg university and didn't have to sit the test because they accepted the certificate of my B.A. in German as proof. But this was many, many years ago and things may now have been standardised.

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Posted

Thanks. Yeah she was over 3 years at Uni there. I will inform her about the proof of German, although not her main problem. 8000 Euro in a bank account unfortunately is. Lucky for me personally I am an EU citizen and don't need to have that to study.

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