German cuisine at dinner parties

109 posts in this topic

Posted

This made me laugh. About how frugality rules at German dinner parties.

This BBC reporter went to a dinner party in Berlin - and was surprised to find himself served boiled potatoes, boiled green vegetables and ham!

I've had similar experiences myself with strange German cuisine. Both at invites as well as German office and Verein meetups.

Dog-food barbecues as I call them. Bland pieces of meat with little or no spicing (usually none - other than mustard of course), and little or no sauce. As for any imaginative veg - forget it. If you're lucky there will be some kartoffelsalat and thats it.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20355476

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Posted

Heard that yesterday on R4, in context, the story was speculating about why Germany is now the strongest economy in the Eurozone. Germans don't like borrowing money, and that, allied to the 'Made in Germany' ethos, plus its export driven economy means German money stays largely in Germany.

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Posted

Can't be that bad

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/michelin-stars-signal-new-era-of-german-cuisine-a-867191.html

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Posted

Can't be that bad

My guess is that Michelin starred restaurants in Germany will have very little effect on the eating habits of the nation as a whole, unlike some other countries (ahem) which had/have notoriously bad cuisine, but where the value of quality ingredients and cooking skills is massive compared to what it was 20 years ago.

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Posted

Germans really are frugal. They like boiled potatoes - and good for them, say I.

I think the usual indignant suspects need to actually read the piece and think about what it is the BBC journo is saying.

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Posted

If you're referring to me, I've read the article.

Why would the Germans at their dinner parties serve their guests something different than what they eat everyday?

Or conversely, why should the guest expect something different than what the Germans eat every day?

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Posted

Why would the Germans at their dinner parties serve their guests something different than what they eat everyday?

Haha, seriously? Your dinner parties must be the talk of the town.

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Posted

Yours must be too. :lol:

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Posted

If you're referring to me, I've read the article.

Why would the Germans at their dinner parties serve their guests something different than what they eat everyday?

Or conversely, why should the guest expect something different than what the Germans eat every day?

I don't know, because it's a dinner party, not a Tuesday night eating some bread and sliced deli before flipping on the BBC and sitting the evening on a couch.

I bet the author was really at a BBQ, but it didn't fit his objective to write about a BBQ.

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Posted

Google the journo he is the BBC's correspondent in Berlin and is penning a few articles about how Germans are and life in Berlin.

guess this is just the latest single tunnel visioned experience being sold as the general state of things here.

we just had German pals over for a Thai meal, they had us over for Mexican meal the other week. oo and last month we were round there for Raclette, we've had Weisswurst brekkies with them (though they are Ossis), they've enjoyed English Sunday Roast dinners with us, Italian meals and Indian curries at ours.

that is just one German family, does not mean that all German folk are that Internationally minded re. dinner party scran.

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Posted

So, exactly what gourmet dish did you bring with you to share with the guest?

No-one was required to bring any dish along, gourmet or otherwise.

But when it was my turn, I thought, I'll show you we English have better taste in food than you think.

So I went to Lidl - Lidl note, not any gourmet delicatessen or anything. Bought a selection of cheeses, hams, seafood, and a sprinkling of cherry tomatoes, grapes and other odds and ends, and various bread rolls.

The amusing thing was to see their eyes pop and their mouths gape.

As I said, I didnt consider it any big deal, only a decent spread. Nothing gourmet. It doesn't have to be dog food every time.

I have been to dinner/buffet events in Germany where they've served reasonably good food, mostly where the attendees and/or hosts are veggie. But other than this it's been a rarity and dog food seems to prevail. OK if you're an Alsatian I suppose.

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Posted

In my opinion as the chief cook in our home, German women of career age and younger are just not that interested in the kitchen and there is nothing wrong with that.

They ARE into kitchens. As status symbols to keep spotlessly clean and show off. Hence all the Miele etc which comes from Germany.

But not to cook in. Das waere zu Schade fuer die Kueche.

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Posted

Goodness, rick, do you even like these people? Seems a pretty grim view of German women.

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Posted

Because everyone knows the Germans don't drive flashy cars or go on posh vacations.

Last time I checked, Magaluf was not a posh holiday destination.

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Posted

Goodness, rick, do you even like these people? Seems a pretty grim view of German women.

It's nothing to do with liking Germans, (or not) denying that German food is basic to say the least is just plain old ignoring the facts.

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Posted

If the potatoes were small new potatoes and the green beans were small and in season and the ham was the thick-sliced variety... what's the problem? I would love to eat that. (I have a weakness for green beans. Nothing nicer when they're in seaason. Dad used to grow two rows of them in our back garden every year.). And new potatoes... even the British make a fuss about that. And as for ham... my Spanish friend has one of those large hams in her kitchen all the time - just right for slicing of a piece every now and again.

Some people like me like unfussy stuff. Plain, simple, where you can enjoy the unspoilt flavours of the ingredients.

But when it comes to home cooking, I've never encountered any German of my age that couldn't cook well.

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Posted

If the potatoes were small new potatoes and the green beans were small and in season and the ham was the thick-sliced variety... what's the problem?

And then his wife proudly produced the food - boiled potatoes, boiled green vegetables and ham, boiled ham.

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Posted

It's nothing to do with liking Germans, (or not) denying that German food is basic to say the least is just plain old ignoring the facts.

If you invite people to dinner, surely you should be offering them something a little better than boiled potatoes, veg and ham. I'd be embarrassed to offer that. You might as well offer them beans on toast

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Posted

They ARE into kitchens. As status symbols to keep spotlessly clean and show off. Hence all the Miele etc which comes from Germany. But not to cook in. Das waere zu Schade fuer die Kueche.

Sorry, I see that Chocky and Rick have ignored the question which was in reference to the above post. Do you really have such a grim view of German women that you think the only thing they care about in their kitchens is the brand of the appliances and the style of the cabinets? This is the grim view to which I was referring.

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