Where to buy an iron cooking vessel

15 posts in this topic

Posted

hi,

 

Please help me, where can I buy Iron (Eisen) cooking vessel in Munich.

 

Thanks

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Posted

are you looking for pots, pans or grills?

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Posted

Thats where we bought ours, make sure you type in (eisenpfannen) for best results.

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Posted

Related quesion -

 

Do iron skillets/pots scratch glass top stoves?

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Posted

any pot or pan will scratch a glass top stove, When using iron skillets you just have to be careful sitting in on the stove because they are so heavy.

and when cleaning them, make sure to scrub the bottom off also.

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Posted

Yep, I think they're OK if you sand off any rough edges on the base of the pan and don't drag it across the cooktop.

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Posted

Thanks. I read a lot of conflicting info on the web. Some say they must be enamel coated. Some say not. All say don't drag them on stove and don't use ones with rings on the bottom or obvious imperfections.

 

As for scrubbing them, I think the advantage of using iron skillets is that you don't scrub them. Just wipe them out so they retain flavor.

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Posted

 

Thanks. I read a lot of conflicting info on the web. Some say they must be enamel coated. Some say not. All say don't drag them on stove and don't use ones with rings on the bottom or obvious imperfections.As for scrubbing them, I think the advantage of using iron skillets is that you don't scrub them. Just wipe them out so they retain flavor.

 

That's because there are no absolute rules... as with most things.

 

Enamel and uncoated cast-iron have their own respective advantages and disadvantages. It's also difficult to talk about all cookware here... considering these materials are used for everything from plain skillets to dutch ovens to woks.

 

Unless you're cooking with cast iron all the time, you'll be scrubbing it to a point. It takes time and regular use to make/keep it really non-stick. And it's less about taste-retention than it is about even heating, lasting forever, being the original non-stick, and perhaps leeching iron into your food (a good thing). But iron can influence the taste of vegetables and light-flavored foods; some people dislike it for this reason. And acidic things in particular (tomatoes) can do this and/or etch away at the pan. I don't mind it. I love cooking with cast-iron. It's great for searing meats too, or for dishes that move from stovetop to oven in the same pan.

 

I'd personally prefer a dutch oven to be enamel, and all other cast-iron skillets to be raw. But this is a topic that some people take as religion (enamel vs. uncoated; best fat/oil for seasoning; acidic vs. non acidic cooking.

 

We got ours, a large skillet, at Kustermann. It was an utter and complete rip-off. They go for about 1/4 the price in the U.S.

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Posted

.

look, an iron cooking vessel will not, by and large, be enough for your Iron-man suit.

 

What you need is a galvanised, glass beads blasted, and electrochemically polished 316 stainless steel.

 

You will also need some ports and flanges for the arms, as well as viewports, especially for showing off the glowing energy source.

 

These companies can help you, with custom build armors. I strongly recommend them - perfect service.

 

Here a typical suit they built for me in the past.

 

post-27831-13524829910503.jpgpost-27831-13524829990972.jpg

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Posted

 

It is possible to pick up one at a flea market as well.

 

This is probably the best option if you can find one. Silly cheap, and they don't really wear out. Scrub and clean. Season, which you'll want to do anyway if it's new-- the easiest way is a light coating of oil or lard (many people say flaxseed/leinol works best/hardest), flipped it upside down on a rack w/ foil under to catch any dripping oil, and bake in the over for an hour. Let cool, wipe out excess oil. Do this a few times and it'll be like you've been cooking with the skillet for a year... but in an afternoon. Expect the oil to smoke. You can do it on the stovetop too, but it's slower and obviously more smokey/smelly.

 

Then just use it as much as possible to continue building up the non-stick coating...

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