Will university tuition rise for non-Germans?

27 posts in this topic

Posted

Over the past couple years, countries like the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden, whose public universities all used to offer free tuition to EU nationals and non-nationals alike, have all implemented tuition fees for non-EU nationals, sometimes quite high ones. As far as I can tell, the German public universities continue to be free for all. Does anybody know whether we should expect this to change quite soon, given these trends across Europe?

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Posted

No I don't think so.

In Germany there has always been the language barrier, there hasn't been a noticeable influx of non-EU students, so there is no need to introduce them.

Anyway, there are actually getting rid of the standard tuition fees in the few Bundesländer where they still have them.

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Posted

In the Netherlands it was never free, but relatively low like €1600 per year for Dutch students and EU students. For non-EU nationals the fees have been increased quite a bit last year. I think this is fine since why do Dutch tax payers have to subsidize their studies? Doing a Masters in Germany isn't exactly cheap as well, e.g. a 2-year M.Sc. in Information Management ("Wirtschaftsinformatik") can cost you €5000 per year on tuition fees. I believe there is an influx of British students in Germany since they have to pay like £9000 (> €11K) back home every year for a bachelor.

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Posted

e.g. a 2-year M.Sc. in Information Management ("Wirtschaftsinformatik") can cost you €5000 per year on tuition fees.

... at a private university maybe. Not at "regular" state universities.

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Posted

I don't see any bigger influx of EU citizens anywhere, despite the crisis and bleak expectations in many parts of Europe. There are certainly some foreigners, like the Chinese, that are more visible since a few years, but no one seems to care about raising fees on students. It seems mroe probably that other countries like Austria or Switzerland increase the fees to reduce the number of Germans than the other way round.

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Posted

I would say never say never. If there is a steady increase of non-German nationals studying at German universities, it's more than likely that tution fees will increase and why not? Why should German taxpayers have to pay for your bachelor degree if you haven't paid anything back into the system?

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Posted

Over the past couple years, countries like the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden, whose public universities all used to offer free tuition to EU nationals and non-nationals alike, have all implemented tuition fees for non-EU nationals, sometimes quite high ones. As far as I can tell, the German public universities continue to be free for all. Does anybody know whether we should expect this to change quite soon, given these trends across Europe?

Well, since you brought it up.

I'm sure someone in the gov't will read this post and say "Heyyyy, I got an idea to bring more money in.

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Posted

And then the students will start rallying in the streets again, the parents will vote those guys out of government again, and everyone's happy again.

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Posted

@JOSHTRUS: the Germans cannot, theoretically, increase the fees on non-Germans, they have to treat all EU citizens as locals, even if they like to bend the rules a little. And also remember that if some foreigner is studying here, some German is studying somewhere else. It's an exchange.

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Posted

The Germans who will study abroad has no intention to let taxpayers of a certain country to pay for their study.But the non germans who come here, let just accept the main reason is the free university .Anyway it's very nice when other people support our study.

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Posted

I was talking about non-EU nationals of course. Can you imagine a German national going to an American university, asking to study for free AND have all his/her lessons in German. It's not going to happen.

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Posted

In the Netherlands it was never free, but relatively low like €1600 per year for Dutch students and EU students. For non-EU nationals the fees have been increased quite a bit last year. I think this is fine since why do Dutch tax payers have to subsidize their studies? Doing a Masters in Germany isn't exactly cheap as well, e.g. a 2-year M.Sc. in Information Management ("Wirtschaftsinformatik") can cost you €5000 per year on tuition fees. I believe there is an influx of British students in Germany since they have to pay like £9000 (> €11K) back home every year for a bachelor.

Sorry, where? I think in Bayern, where the tuition fees are the highest, it would be something like 1000 € a year - but only for the richest students.

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Posted

..., e.g. a 2-year M.Sc. in Information Management ("Wirtschaftsinformatik") can cost you €5000 per year on tuition fees. ...

Uni Mannheim, Wirtschaftsinformatik Master, 210€ a year. I am in the second semester. To top it all, the programm is in English.

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Posted

I checked it with the German student involved, but with a Masters she actually meant a MBA in IT Management at her public FH. Sorry for the confusion.

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Posted

I was talking about non-EU nationals of course. Can you imagine a German national going to an American university, asking to study for free AND have all his/her lessons in German. It's not going to happen.

It's anything but unheard of for non-US citizens to get funding for graduate study in the US- happens all the time.

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Posted

The Germans who will study abroad has no intention to let taxpayers of a certain country to pay for their study.But the non germans who come here, let just accept the main reason is the free university .Anyway it's very nice when other people support our study.

That's a ridiculous supposition. You accuse all non-Germans and at the same time you consider all Germans to be fair minded. No wonder that in Austria and Switzerland they are pretty tired of the Germans.

Either you are German or racist. Or both.

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Posted

From my understanding, at the Uni, all EU nationals get treated like Germans (at least with respect to tuition). Some Unis run special programs (in english sometimes) at higher rates for foreigners. But then I think the EU citizens get the local price.

They could charge more to non EU students which would be fair (they don't pay in to the system) but even our not so generous friends in south west germany realize that setting up a separate tuition system would end up costing a lot of money (you have to hire a bunch of beamtes) and many of the non EU students want to stay and work in the EU. That is a brain drain for their home countries, but a huge win for Germany if young folks stay after their Uni time and work, as they pay a lot of taxes. Most countries want educated (Uni trained) people to immigrate.

In the US, the system in Wisconsin used to be in state tuition was subsidized, out of state but US citizens paid cost (~105% or so) and foreigners more than 100%.

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Posted

while the low/no fees policy might attract some non EU people, most get stuck in the language barrier and the strict German immigration law. All the requirements for funds, insurance and so on, deter many of the non serious candidates. Learning german is no easy task and in my opinion makes sense for people who are interested in staying here long term and thus work here and pay back in the system.

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Posted

To top it all, the programm is in English.

Your program is officially in dual German/English. See http://bewerbung.uni-mannheim.de/index.php?abschlfach=88277

The first pure English master programm is planned to be introduced in Mannheim with HWS2013.

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Posted

I just saw your post only now.

The course is offered completely in English. There are one or two courses which are offered in German, but it is not mandatory to take these, there are alternative English courses.

There are a number of students who do not speak German who are doing the Master Wifo Program with me.

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Posted

I know ;)

Still, officially the program isn't in English - they can, in theory, hold lectures in German instead of English. Same goes e.g. for MMM right now. Starting next year they'll offer a course that does not require any German officially.

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Posted

That's right. I know an instance where the professor started giving lectures in German because the course had more students than he wanted to teach :) 70% of the students left.

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Posted

The Germans who will study abroad has no intention to let taxpayers of a certain country to pay for their study.But the non germans who come here, let just accept the main reason is the free university .Anyway it's very nice when other people support our study.

I know many who pay 14,800 € over 4 semesters to RWTH for the International masters courses in Mechanical Engineering (PSE, Automotive, Combustion and CAME) AND consider it a bargain. Time to get off your high horse, I think.

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Posted

Come on, I'm talking the reality here.Life is just to hard for other people to support their children to enter university in their own country and Germany is a big help for them. By the way some are just honest to tell us that they are coming here because they cannot afford university in their own country.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/high-university-tuition-in-england-leads-students-to-germany-a-859447.html

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