English-taught masters degree programs in Germany

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Posted

Hi guys,

I've graduated in Mechanical Engineering in May,2011 from India. Since July, I have been working in an Indian company. I wanted to know that what are the different graduation courses, from which I can choose to do my masters in Germany. I am interested in MS in Industrial Management though. But other suggestions will be open heartly welcomed.

...And one little detail, course have to be taught in English. I don't have much knowledge of German. So basically I want the list of masters courses, list of good universities and the fees and living expenses.

I also need to know if have to appear for GRE and TOEFL or just TOEFL?

Thanks, Help would be greatly appreciated.

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Posted

No one has all of that information in their head. If you want useful responses do some research via Google and come back with a few very narrow questions and you might get them answered.

English-language programs are typically referred to as "international programs" here, so bear that in mind when you use Google. Also check out daad.de.

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Posted

Check TUHH for English-language masters programmes.

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Posted

ditto engelchen

spoonfeeding should not be expected here. You need to do your homework Sir, at least part of it.

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Posted

It looks like this is what you will be required to have as far as German is concerned. I only had to google for like 2 minutes (industrial magangement programs in germany taught in english), which is why you're getting some nastygrams here.

Language admission requirements

From the same page and to spoon feed you a little more:

The fulltime MBA in International Industrial Management provides a thorough foundation in the essentials of business management. Special attention is paid to the state-of-the-art management skills in the context of the global market and industrial corporations. Before commencing the MBA programme, students attend a three-week compact course in German language and culture which includes language classes, lectures in German culture and excursions to many cities and other places of interest. By means of this compact course students get an insight into German culture and improve their German language skills. Language classes and excursions are available to students throughout the year which is the first step for the effective networking. The academic course starts at the beginning of October. Because of our cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach, not every student entering the programme will have the same level of business education or experience. We believe that all students should acquire a thorough foundation in all functional areas of business management. First semester has therefore the aim of achieving common fundamental knowledge and insights for everybody. In the second semester courses for advanced in-depth study with international aspects will be offered including practical application. The content of this coursework will be transferred to students also through teamwork, case studies and real examples in order to intensify knowledge in the business functional areas. The following modules are covered in the first and second semesters: Business planning, Finance, Information technology, International management, Marketing and Strategy, Methods and Tools, Operations management and Organisational behaviour. The main feature of the Esslingen MBA is our dedication to producing business graduates who are marketable. Therefore, students will prepare a three-month corporate project and a Master thesis respectively either in industrial or service sector that takes place in the final semester. It provides the students with the opportunity to use the knowledge and skills learned during the course and to study a specific issue in depth. They carry out a project involving problem solving, deliver solutions and give their recommendations by using their capacities, their research, analytical and problem solving skills. The practical parts will be conducted in close conjunction with a professor and a company manager. The international focus of the curriculum is enhanced by a multinational student body. Out of this dynamic cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural learning environment, new sources of synergy and productivity are created and new skills are acquired.

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Posted

...And one little detail, course have to be taught in English. I don't have much knowledge of German. So basically I want the list of masters courses, list of good universities and the fees and living expenses.

Surely part of the point of studying in Germany would be to learn German? Theres not much point in coming to Germany and studying in English, because at best youll get a translated course taught by non-native speakers

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Posted

Surely part of the point of studying in Germany would be to learn German? Theres not much point in coming to Germany and studying in English, because at best youll get a translated course taught by non-native speakers

Actually, not true. German Universities are actively recruiting English native speakers to teach English courses and programs. I met an American professor over here back in '04 when I was doing my internship, couldn't speak a lick of German, and was hired on to teach the PolySci course.

The Germans aren't going to have Profs teaching courses that aren't at least native level proficiency in English.

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Posted

Hello Harman.

Well, I got to tell you that your question arises a potential broad spectrum of answers. As it has been said properly in previous posts, no one has all the answers for it in their hands. Every German state has its own policies concerning tertiary education, and there is a handful of universities which offer the so-called international master programmes which also happen to have their own criteria for admission, selection, fees, etc. There are certain states in which fees are not required (as will be the case for Baden-Wurttemberg from next semester on). Perhaps it will be better if you could look on the internet for what you would like specifically to pursue concerning your studies and if you find some universities which offer it in a certain German state/city/college town then you could find the doubts you would like to be solved by people who could help you in TT or wherever concerning info is available. In addition, getting some German language skills on your belt is highly relevant, even though you are planning to study in English since everyone "outside" the University (and sometimes within it) would expect you to have German language skills. It is important to have motivation to learn it as well. Concerning the English language quality in the international master programmes I could say that from my own experience it is not that bad. Most professors have impressive English skills since they are actively publishing papers and doing research which requires communicating with their counterparts abroad, albeit it is true that some lectures are really struggling to find the proper terms to explain themselves in the lecture room sessions.

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Posted

Surely part of the point of studying in Germany would be to learn German?

I have the impression that currently the main draw to Germany is the low to non-existent tuition fees; I have met many foreign graduates who studied in English, never bothered to learn German, and are now wondering why they are having difficulty finding jobs. :blink:

The Germans aren't going to have Profs teaching courses that aren't at least native level proficiency in English.

You wish! I can tell you from personal experience that many German profs have deplorable English language skills; I actually took more courses in German than English because I didn't have the patience for the Genglisch used by some German profs attempting to teach in English. <_<

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Posted

I haven't seen too much of those low to non-existent tuition fees... the English-language Masters programs in law and management aren't cheap!! Maybe it's the Bachelor courses that cost so little. :blink:

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Posted

"International programmes" (i.e. taught in English) very often have tuition fees. However, there are also many masters programmes with tuition fees of 500€ or less per semester (these usually require at least C1 German for admission).

Although I wouldn't recommend most of the courses taught in English, for example, the Viadrina has a masters degree that doesn't have any tuition fees.

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Posted

Hello again Harman,

If less or non-existent tution fees is the main thing alluring you to study in Germany then please act prudently.

Think a bit ahead in future. Do you want to stay back and work in Germany after your Masters? If no, then it hardly matters. You can come here, do your course and go back home. But one needs to mention here that the quality of English courses here isn't impressive at all. At the end of it, you will just be wasting one year here as Germany's Master degrees don't have much value elsewhere.

But if you plan to stay back and work here, then keep in mind the foll:

- As per my knowledge, majority of the people who do English courses here have to go back to their homelands empty-handed as they are unable to find jobs here.

- German language is a MUST here to find a job (and I mean it...not just basic German, you need to have extremely good german skills)

- In case you get a job by fluke without German, you will have a hard time interacting with colleagues.

- It seems you have just graduated recently. The odds of finding a job here with hardly any work experience are extremely less.

Don't be in a hurry. Act wisely!

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Posted

You wish! I can tell you from personal experience that many German profs have deplorable English language skills; I actually took more courses in German than English because I didn't have the patience for the Genglisch used by some German profs attempting to teach in English.

I stand corrected. I thought there was some sort of movement to compete. No personal experience except the one meeting. I thought it was much more extensive.

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Posted

- As per my knowledge, majority of the people who do English courses here have to go back to their homelands empty-handed as they are unable to find jobs here.

I hadn't heard this before. Can anyone comment on whether this is this accurate?

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Posted

But one needs to mention here that the quality of English courses here isn't impressive at all. At the end of it, you will just be wasting one year here as Germany's Master degrees don't have much value elsewhere.

Yeah, that's a load of BS.

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Posted

@all

alot a misleading info given here , so my first hand experiance

1. English taught course are of bad quality and professor have bad english speaking capabilities ...This is pure BS , prof as well as courses are high quality stuff ...

2. You wont get a job without german languaue skills ..Again BS, I and all my course mates ,all seniors /juniors from my Uni..colleagues from other university have got job without german skills..most of them within 3 months of finishing the course..but YES german is very very important factor to have a good rise in a german company and to enjoy your work and life ,as well as in social life here in germany...so at some point of time you have to learn german as your german colleagues wont speak english for long

3. As someone said go to www.daad.org for databases of master course in english...best place for all info

All these points is from my experiance and applies to Software & Engineering fields only.

YR

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Posted

- As per my knowledge, majority of the people who do English courses here have to go back to their homelands empty-handed as they are unable to find jobs here.

I hadn't heard this before. Can anyone comment on whether this is this accurate?

The only fact that I can offer is that relatively few foreign graduates end up staying in Germany after graduation compared with other countries such as Canada, the UK, and Australia.

Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that foreign graduates with excellent grades (1,0 - 1,5) have a good chance of finding a decent job, however, even good students (1,6 - 2,5) have difficulty if they don't speak German. Foreign graduates with mediocre grades need contacts or to have completed a few internships in order to have a chance.

Having said that, currently most IT graduates are able to find entry-level jobs and many engineering graduates are having difficulty unless they have practical experience.

1. English taught course are of bad quality and professor have bad english speaking capabilities ...This is pure BS , prof as well as courses are high quality stuff ...

First, do you think that your profs are even able to write English better than you can?

Second, I have taken courses in both English and German in Germany and the quality was definitely better in German. Have you taken courses offered in German for comparison?

All these points is from my experiance and applies to Software & Engineering fields only.

The IT job market is much different from the rest of the job market for graduates. Most of the foreign graduates that I know who don't speak proper German have had difficulty finding a job.

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Posted

Chad8504 & YoRambo: What you guys are saying is BS! Better check your facts before making any comments!

engelchen: Way to go! Thanks for your support.

When I say that majority of the foreigners are unable to find jobs without knowing German, I am referring to decent respectable jobs in Engineering/Software/Finance/Marketing n so on, and not working as a WAITER in some Italian restaurant, or ironing clothes for somebody!!!

A fact will remain a fact...

And as far as Harman's case is concerned, I don't think so that he has any influential contacts here in Germany which could help him get a job here! Neither does he have sufficient work experience....

And don't forget, even though German has become very international today, German is still the working language and also the language used for internal communication between colleagues.

Think practically!!!

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When I say that majority of the foreigners are unable to find jobs without knowing German, I am referring to decent respectable jobs in Engineering/Software/Finance/Marketing n so on, and not working as a WAITER in some Italian restaurant, or ironing clothes for somebody!!!

A fact will remain a fact...

I am sorry but in which region and which University did you study? I swear that almost everybody who studied with me, with a decent grade (atleast 2.x) got a respectable job (unlimited contract, atleast 40k p.a.). Even though the german skills werent good at all. There are many other factors which mattter (Technical skills, Thesis topic etc).

Ofcourse, at the workplace some difficulties will be faced. But ultimately if you keep making small but constant effort, the language becomes manageable!

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Posted

Chad8504 & YoRambo: What you guys are saying is BS! Better check your facts before making any comments!

I stand by what I said. Your comment that claimed that "Germany's Master degrees don't have much value elsewhere" is complete bullshit. You can keep trying to claim that it's a fact, but it isn't.

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