Faulty DSL wiring

44 posts in this topic

Posted

Hey all. Currently trying to sort internet and phone at my new apartment.

The socket on the wall is the standard 3 plug - "N" "F" "N"

when i take it out the wall, there is a black and a red wire, in the first two screws. (1,2)

The Modem says plug into F, and voila should go.. But it doesnt.

We are currently waiting for an engineer to come, but after 2 failed visits, i dont hold out much hope in them!

Is this a false socket? can i test it? Help!

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Posted

we have spoken to somebody over the phone whos just said to leave it all plugged in and they will try to find out something.

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Posted

Depending on your provider you need a splitter box (supplied free by your provider). This plugs into the "F" outlet. The splitter box has itself "N", "F", and ""N" outlets, but also an RJ45 outlet into which you connect your DSL modem or modem/router (assuming you have one). A normal phone can be connected to the "F" outlet on the splitter box. Some providers offer a combined splitter box/modem/router in which case you connect this directly to the "F" on the wall outlet and phone to the combined unit.

post-72-13206114809679.png

Once you have connected modem or modem/router then you will need to setup your internet access on your PC (if modem only) or on the router (if modem/router, but usually via a browser on a connected PC) using the access details (username and password) sent to you by your provider.

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Posted

thanks for the reply. The box from the company is the splitter box aswell i think...

It says to plug into F on the wall, The telephone into F on the modem, and the internet can then be wireless or wired into 1 of 4 sockets.

so it looks like i have a TAE Hausanschluss

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Posted

yep, just checked, the modem does have a DSL splitter built in

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Posted

Makes sense. Most German telephone outlets are "TAE". It sounds like you have a router with integrated splitter and modem. Who is your provider?

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Posted

i think it was alice.

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Posted

You think it was Alice?

Who do you know it is now?

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Posted

so vodafone sorry

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Posted

the letter says vodafone.

My partner deals with all of that side, im the one to just pull bits off the wall and poke around till it goes normally :)

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Posted

Despite poking around it is unlikely to work until the engineer comes. He's the man (or woman) that connects the wires in the street and checks it works in your apartment

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Posted

ah ok, Well that was meant to be the original plan, but as i said, on two occasions they havent come. And when we called today, the lady told us that you dont always need somebody to come out - that you can do it yourself.

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Posted

They usually send a technician when whey can't identify the individual wires to your apartment. This is usually the case when you were not able to provide them with details of the previous tenant or number when you sign up. An engineer is also needed if you change providers (or providers change between tenants) as there may be some re-wiring to do (at least at the exchange or street box) to hook you into a different service. The presence of the engineer also confirms the connection and starts the billing. There is a slim possibility that the connection was already made and they were lucky to find your connection, but it's unlikely. Have you tried the phone? Unless you have an IP-based phone connection then plugging in an ordinary phone is a good initial test.

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Posted

Aha ok. Now I see clearer.

I've plugged the phone In. It doesn't do anything apart from a very faint static when you pick it up. I suppose we will just keep on at the company again till somebody comes.

It's definatilly old wiring here. But I know that the downstairs neighbour has Internet. And the same

Dsl modem box as us. I can always try to ask him tomorrow.

Thanks so much for the help. Adam

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Posted

Don't really see how checking with the neighbour will help. His wires are different you yours.

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Posted

If there any telco/DSL experts or keen amateurs, maybe you can advise on what to do with my TAE to DSL splitter wiring connections...

Several years ago I had the DSL splitter moved and I didn't ask how it was done, but I discovered the extension was done simply by connecting a length of new cable to the old one and running this to the new location. Which makes sense.

However the connection was done simply by twisting the wires together (there are only two - black and red) putting a piece of electrical tape over and then stuffing the lot into the cabling channel in the wall.

I was a bit shocked by the vulnerability of this and replaced it with a strip connector. This seemed to cause some attenuation and I went back to the crude - but effective - twist-together method.

Does any know of the proper way to do this (without using RJ45 plugs and connectors - since I've no room in the cable channel for this), or is this, in fact, the most signally efficient way to extend telecom wiring?

RT

PS: The picture below is not the actual wires, but it shows the method used...

post-2352-1359637186085.jpg

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Posted

Replace the 2 separate cables with a SINGLE longer cable.

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Posted

In our house the telephone cables were previously extended using 3M Scotchlok connectors. I bought a few and used them myself when I needed to alter the phone wiring.

They come in different sizes for different wire thickness. The insulation is left on the wires which are pushed into the openings. When squeezed the connector grips both wires, cuts through the insulation and connects the two together.

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Posted

Telephone/DSL lines up to 16Mbit are pretty resilient to connections in the cable. So long as it's mechanically stable simply winding the strands together and insulating them is usually fine. Solder or a Scotchlok (maybe a bit of an over-kill) are even better. Higher speed VDSL lijes (25Mb or 50Mb) won't like multiple connections and certainly not very long extensions (as speed can be reduced when the physical connection is longer than originally planned, but I've extended 20-30m without too many problems). Using the correct (solid, rather than stranded) cable for phone connections is important.

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Posted

Oddly enough, I am now upgrading to IP-based connection which goes to 50mbs. I now realise that I don't know where that TAE box is. The splitter and ISDN box (both will be redundant) I can see on the ground floor by the FritzBox 7390, but the TAE must be buried in the wiring trunks in the Kellar.

As a cheat, can you simply plug the FritzBox into the "F" socket on the Splitter?

(not worried by the multiple lengths of DSL cabling with splices and twist connections sad.gif )

RT

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Posted

The ISDN (NTBA) box is redundant, but the splitter box isn't. The Fritz will stay connected as before to the bottom RJ45 outlet of the splitter. Just make sure it's pretty new. Old splitter boxes don't support VDSL. Telekom (if it is they) will give you a new replacement for free if you ask them.

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Posted

The ISDN (NTBA) box is redundant,

Unless the OP is getting or is being migrated to VOIP service as well. Connections without an actual ISDN line

don't need a splitter. The FB 7390 can handle it all internally.

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Posted

Thanks, Gents.

Actually I made a typo - I am _now_ worried by the multiple sections and connections I have in the DSL cable. Let's see what happens on the 8th March when it supposedly goes live.

RT

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Posted

Unless the OP is getting or is being migrated to VOIP service as well. Connections without an actual ISDN line

don't need a splitter. The FB 7390 can handle it all internally.

Read the post - it's an IP-based connection and the TAE outlet is not reachable, so he can't (easilly) remove the splitter.

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Posted

Who Installed the Connection in the first place??

Maybe they can remember where the Splitter is!! :ph34r:

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