The German education system

97 posts in this topic

Posted

I find this to be so horribly true in Germany...

"An important part of the Prussian system was that it defined for the child what was to be learned, what was to be thought about, how long to think about it and when a child was to think of something else. Basically, it was a system of thought control, and it established a penchant in the psyche of the German elite that would later manifest itself into what we now refer to as mind control."

"The educational system was divided into three groups. The elite of Prussian society were seen as comprising .5% of the society. Approximately 5.5% of the remaining children were sent to what was called realschulen, where they were partially taught to think. The remaining 94% went to volkschulen, where they were to learn “harmony, obdience, freedom from stressful thinking and how to follow orders.” An important part of this new system was to break the link between reading and the young child, because a child who reads too well becomes knowledgable and independent from the system of instruction and is capable of finding out anything."

http://feltd.wordpress.com/2010/09/16/the-prussian-german-educational-system/

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Posted

I reckon you´ll find this true everywhere in the world´s history, john99. Don´t understand your motive for posting this. Welcome to Toytown anyway!

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Posted

hello john

i find it to be much more true here.

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Posted

What do you mean, john99? I absolutely respect your opinion, by the way...whatever it may be.

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Posted

It's not completely off base... the inclination to not question what one was learning gave birth to Waldorf Schools, which encouraged free thinking.

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Posted

Well the last part of john99's quote is still true today. Germany and Austria are the only countries that use the much criticized three tier system. Change happens slowly here.

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Posted

Waldorf! The magic word!

I was discussing this subject with a friend of mine.

To both of us, the "recommendation" that you get at the age of 10, is complete nonsense. So we started asking our German friends for a way to get out of this authoritarian system, but, since we asked in Germany, they would not know what the problem was, but after much arguing, somebody came up with Waldorf and something called "international school", but they were bot able to describe what the international school really was.

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Posted

What set of problems? Are they not supposed to educate children into free thinking?

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Posted

What set of problems? Are they not supposed to educate children into free thinking?

Talk about transparent leading questions. Why didn't you just start your first post in the thread with your honest opinion and agenda rather than all the bollocks.

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Posted

westvan- while I'd agree that the three-tiered system is outdated, I think that a two-tiered system is necessary because 1) there is a wide variance in ability among students 2) a wide variance in parental capacity and inclination to support their educational endeavors and 3) many trades don't require the extent of theoretical knowledge needed for Abitur and other trades/university study.

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Posted

In some parts of the country they're actually starting to combine the Hauptschule and Realschule and calling it the Oberschule, so it's a step in the right direction. I have nothing against a two tiered system, I just think they could do a better job of it in general - either make all schools comprehensive or separate the Oberschule and Gymnasium, not a mix of both the way it is now. One of our kids just graduated from Gymnasium and the other one has three more years to go so I'll be watching all the changes with great interest.

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Posted

There is always room for improvement. One area that might merit consideration is when English instruction begins- seems to me it should be in kindergarten rather than in 3rd grade and that there should be some bilingual public schools (and not just German/English either).

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Posted

seems to me it should be in kindergarten rather than in 3rd grade

Why? I mean other than the mental immersion issue.

Schools in this state start English (or French) in 1st grade btw.

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Posted

There are bi-lingual state schools in Berlin for English, Polish, Greek, French and other languages. And Fruh Englisch begins in Kita with a minor extra charge (that we paid rather than have our child be the only one not in it). And there was regular Fruh Englisch in 1st grade.

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Posted

starting to combine the Hauptschule and Realschule and calling it the Oberschule

Mittelschule. And they're mostly calling it that in Bavaria, in other states they just fold the Hauptschule into Realschule in one way or another (Realschule Plus, Werkrealschulen etc).

Oberschule is the ancient term for a Gymnasium, more precisely for grade 11 to 13.

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Posted

Hi guys, I haven't read through all your comments. But it happened there are two ladies from NGO came to VHS (Volkshochschule) to explain to the students who may have children. Having heard the system, I think it is quite difficult to decide whether the kids should stay with Hauptschule or Realschule after 4 years in Grundschule. They are only 10 years old by then. Isn't it a bit stressful for the kids and parents. Love to hear from you.

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Posted

Mittelschule. And they're mostly calling it that in Bavaria, in other states they just fold the Hauptschule into Realschule in one way or another (Realschule Plus, Werkrealschulen etc).

Oberschule is the ancient term for a Gymnasium, more precisely for grade 11 to 13.

They have been refering to the merging of Real and Hauptschule as Oberschule on the news reports I've heard on the radio in the last few weeks.

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Posted

Is it not the purpose of all State education to produce citizens who tow the line and don't think too much? Nothing unusual about Germany really.

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Posted

I guess that B-W and Berlin are more advanced in that respect than we are in Bayern, unless there's something I don't know.

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Posted

Mittelschule.

I guess this is used exclusively for Bavaria?

They have been refering to the merging of Real and Hauptschule as Oberschule on the news reports I've heard on the radio in the last few weeks.

Yes, in Lower Saxony it's called the Oberschule. Neue Schulstruktur für Niedersachsen

Elementary schools here start English in the 3rd grade.

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Posted

I think it is quite difficult to decide whether the kids should stay with Hauptschule or Realschule after 4 years in Grundschule.

Or a Gymnasium, depending on what kind of recommendation they get. There are three types of secondary schools not including the ones for physically and mentally challenged children.

They are only 10 years old by then. Isn't it a bit stressful for the kids and parents.

It's insane and kind of spoils the elementary school experience if you ask me. Been through it twice. Luckily in our state parents are allowed to choose a secondary school for their children and override the elementary school's decision if necessary.

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