Most cheese is not vegetarian

73 posts in this topic

Posted

I'm a vegetarian of 6 years, but not a vegan: I love cheese, milk and eggs and can't imagine my diet without them.

A few weeks ago, someone mentioned to me in passing that Parmesan cheese is often not considered vegetarian.

Something about the use of animal products in the cheese-making process.

He also mentioned that in the UK, some (but not all) cheeses are marked with the vegetarian "V" symbol.

 

Denial, and my arrogant belief that I knew better had me deny this.

Until this morning, when I read this article by the UK Vegetarian Society.

 

I quote:

 

"The exact processes in the making of cheese varies between different varieties. However, all cheeses are made by essentially the same method. [...] The third stage is the addition of rennet, containing the enzyme chymosin. Rennet is usually sourced from the abomasum (fourth stomach) of newly-born calves. [...] Chymosin is extracted by washing and drying the stomach lining, which is then cut into small pieces and macerated in a solution of boric acid or brine at 30°C for 4-5 days. [...] Rennet coagulates the milk, separating it into curds and whey. This is called curdling."

 

Was I the only one that didn't know? :o

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Posted

well, i knew, and i'm not veggie

soz

hope you don't feel too sick or anything :(

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Posted

yes, and?

 

I guess you also didn't know that if you want a cow to produce the maximum amount of milk the cow has to give birth to a calf in regular intervals, don't ask me how often that is exactly. But trust me it is true, female cows do not just start producing milk at a certain age, they have to have a calf first to get the milk "production" started and then in regular intervals if you want to have the maximum amount (and farmers usually want to get as much milk as they can) from a cow. It pretty much applies to other mammals as well.

 

So, what do you think happens to all these calves born every year? If it wasn't for us meateaters, what would you do with them? So milk production equals meat production.

 

Don't get me wrong I totally respect your decision for not eating meat - whatever your reasons are.

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Posted

Unsure about in other countries, but you can in Canada, get cheese okay for veggie diets. With the rennet taken out, unsure how they do that, but you can also get cheese made of soya products with no milk in it, for those of us with milk allergies. Problem is it doesn't melt as nice- bit of a bummer for nachos! ;)

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Posted

A cow can lactate for about two years after birthing a calf, but the amount tends to fall off in the second year. So most dairy cows give birth every year.

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Posted

 

Unsure about in other countries, but you can in Canada, get cheese okay for veggie diets.  With the rennet taken out, unsure how they do that, but you can also get cheese made of soya products with no milk in it, for those of us with milk allergies.  Problem is it doesn't melt as nice- bit of a bummer for nachos! 

In England too, quite a lot of different types of cheese have the vegetarian "V" seal.

In the article I mentioned above they write that there is a fungus-based enzyme which is the most frequent substitute for rennet.

 

Is vegetarian cheese is available in Munich?

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Posted

I doubt it, as I cannot find soycheese here either. :(

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Posted

The post above yours contains a link

soy cheese and vegie cheese are available!

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Posted

 

Unsure about in other countries, but you can in Canada, get cheese okay for veggie diets.  With the rennet taken out, unsure how they do that,

 

 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

 

Not true,

1. They do not "remove the rennet"

2. Even if they could that would NOT make it "okay for veggie diets."

3. They use non animal rennet for veggie cheeses

 

Jayhay have another look there is a list of brands available here

 

http://vegetarisch-einkaufen.de/ProdInf/Ka...esemitvegl.html

and here

http://vegetarisch-einkaufen.de/ProdInf/Ka...t/kaesealt.html

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Posted

Well, the choice of vegetarian foods in Germany is far less than in Britain unfortunately. I do eat meat, but often vegetarian food tastes better (in my opinion) and you don't have to kill an animal for it. I think that a lot of meat products could be substituted with non-meat ingredients and nobody would notice. This is already the case with pizza toppings, a lot of the 'meat' toppings actually aren't meat. I think that's good; if you're going to kill an animal, it should be for a good reason!

 

Incidentally, cheddar cheese is normally vegetarian, and I just saw some Irish Cheddar in my local cheese shop. Keep an eye out, I bet Hertie has some British/Irish cheddars as well.

 

And just to rub it in, yes you were the only person not to know about cheese not being vegetarian. I would ask youself, how strict do you want to be with your vegetarianism?

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Posted

 

I would ask youself, how strict do you want to be with your vegetarianism?

 

 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

 

You are either a vegetarian or you are not.

Not being a strict vegetarian is a euphemism for being a meat eater.

 

In Jayhay's case he simply didn't know. There is a difference between eating something unwittingly as he did and choosing to eat meat products.

Clearly he is trying to do the right thing as he sees it. And for him that is being a vegetarian

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Posted

 

And just to rub it in, yes you were the only person not to know about cheese not being vegetarian.

To be honest, I wish everyone didn't feel the burning need to rub it in.

It was quite an unpleasant shock for me to find this out and from what I've read this morning, this is something which is quite commonly misunderstood.

 

 

I would ask youself, how strict do you want to be with your vegetarianism?

Obviously each person has to draw the line wherever they feel most comfortable. And in accordance with their own personal convictions.

I don't eat gelatine-based products. I do drink milk and eat eggs.

As of today I'm not going to eat any more cheese.

 

 

Incidentally, cheddar cheese is normally vegetarian

EDIT: Oh and by the way, according to the UK Veg. Society article there are no types of cheese which are consistently or reliably vegetarian (except perhaps "Schlager" music :)).

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Posted

I posted this just yesterday in another thread, however it is so fitting for this thread that I'm going to post it again..

 

@jayhay

 

Man, I seriously think its about time you got sponsored..

 

bigpot6.jpg

 

http://maddox.xmission.com/sponsor.html

 

I'd do it myself, but I'm already sponsoring another vegetarian, and I don't think I could handle eating 6 times my normal intake.. anyone up for it?

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Posted

@Hutcho

 

I saw it in the other thread and I didn't think it was funny there, either.

Definitely no need to post again here.

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Posted

don't they put sturgeon bladders in wine and other alcohol to alter the density?

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