Goodbye to filament lightbulbs

104 posts in this topic

Posted

A TTer asked about this down the pub on Wednesday evening.

It is a staged phase-out, but from September 1, 2009 to 2012 it is goodbye to incandescent bulbs.

The regulations are written so that, in effect, incandescent lightbulbs (the ones you grew up with) will never be able to pass the energy efficiency tests and therefore banned. But CFL (compact fluorescent bulbs), LEDs, and efficient Halogens will all be OK.

See the press release:

At today's meeting of the Ecodesign Regulatory Committee, EU Member States experts endorsed the European Commission's proposals for a regulation progressively phasing out incandescent bulbs starting in 2009 and finishing at the end of 2012. By enforcing the regulation of switching to energy saving bulbs, EU citizens will save close to 40 TWh (roughly the electrictity consumption of Romania, or of 11 million European households, or the equivalent of the yearly output of 10 power stations of 500 megawatts) and will lead to a reduction of about 15 million tons of CO2 emission per year.

Current stocks are legal (if you have some weird desire to stock up) and in fact old stocks will still be legally sellable after 1st September 2009, but very few manufacturers will bother to produce after this date - as they will need to start hitting the new targets (although the dates are staggered).

CFL bulbs get a bad press usually because they are often:

1. Ugly

2. Produce harsh light

3. Not dimmable

All the above are no longer an issue. The latest CFL bulbs have covers to make them look like "traditional" bulbs, the light can be full spectrum and many different shades of white (colour temperature), and they can be dimmable as well. So better quality CFL bulbs will be on the market in future.

This still leaves the issue of mercury content (but all bulbs and manufacturers must adhere to the WEEE disposal regulations) and "electrosmog" - the latter I personally think is just people being daft.

So it is goodbye to these babies:

post-544-1238864012.jpg

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Posted

Too bad, the filament bulb could really last a long time. The longest lasting one is still working and has not been turned off in 108 years in Livermore California.

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Posted

Yes, 4 watts is pretty low. It is clear glass, so it must give off some light. Germans need more or higher lumens to combat the depression of no sun.

I remember my mom using old lightbulbs to darn the holes in our socks.

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Posted

I remember my mom using old lightbulbs to darn the holes in our socks.

Ouch! My mum would use wool or cotton thread... ;)

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Posted

Was that the problem? I thought it was her sewing techniques. :rolleyes:

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Posted

My granny darne our socks the same way..

She said it made light work of it..

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Posted

I saw a report on German TV the other day comparing the two. They had a shop assistant go on about how the light is full spectrum, they last a load longer and they don't take any time to warm up like before.

Then they did the test.

The new bulbs failed miserably in all areas. Even with the bulbs that said they provide warm light, the spectrum was seriously narrow in comparison to the old types. They did a test for longevity, and although the new type do indeed last longer when they are left on, if they are turned on an off a lot, they die much quicker than the old type. And some bulbs took up to 5 minutes (and none less than 30 seconds) to reach their full brightness.

Further to that, a bulb that was rated to give out the same light as a 60W normal bulb actually gave out slightly less than half that amount of light.

All of these results reflect my experience of these new bulbs perfectly.

I'm still using them because they do use a lot less energy, and that's important. But all this spin that is put on them is a load of crap in my opinion.

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Posted

I also read an article from Canada saying that depending on the climate switching to the new lightbulbs will make you pay more for the heating and that according to a study they made the province of British Columbia would have a bigger CO2 footprint if everybody would switch to the newer bulbs.

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Posted

That's an interesting point. As you say, most of the energy sucked up by a 100W lightbulb is turned into heat. However, in hot countries, this could be a double plus side for the non-filament bulbs.

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Posted

Yep definitely. But so far I'm really not convinced with the new bulbs, the light colour is not nice and they take a long time to become bright... I just don't know. They might also be causing headaches because they are supposedly blinking more, not sure where I read that.

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Posted

Well apparently it does make a difference... wonder who I should believe... you or some scientists who know the subject :unsure:

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Posted

I'm also with Clapoti on this. After the light it gives out, all that extra energy that these old type suck up is turned into heat.

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Posted

Is that a joke? The amount of heat given off by a light bulb will make so little difference to the temperature of a room it's not worth even thinking about.

Not a joke. 90% of the energy (or whatever) from a conventional lightbulb is given off in heat. So a 100 Watt lightbulb is actually producing 90 Watts of heat and 10 Watts of light. Energy is never lost, they dont move, and they dont make a noise - so that power can only go into light or heat.

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Posted

Try heating your house with just light bulbs that you've got in your house next winter. You'll freeze!

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Posted

Further to that, a bulb that was rated to give out the same light as a 60W normal bulb actually gave out slightly less than half that amount of light.

All of these results reflect my experience of these new bulbs perfectly.

I'm still using them because they do use a lot less energy, and that's important. But all this spin that is put on them is a load of crap in my opinion.

The rather sexy 14 page Commission Regulations now in place are there to address all your concerns.

New testing and labelling for stuff like this:

1. TECHNICAL PARAMETERS FOR ECODESIGN REQUIREMENTS

For the purposes of compliance and verification of compliance with the requirements of this Regulation, the parameters

below shall be established by reliable, accurate and reproducible measurement procedures, which take into

account the generally recognised state of the art measurement methods.

(a) ‘Lamp efficacy’ (ηlamp), which is the quotient of the luminous flux emitted (Ф) by the power consumed by the

lamp (Plamp): ηlamp = Ф / Plamp(unit: lm/W). The power dissipated by non-integrated auxiliary equipment, such as

ballasts, transformers or power supplies, is not included in the power consumed by the lamp;

( ‘Lamp lumen maintenance factor’ (LLMF), which is the ratio of the luminous flux emitted by the lamp at a given

time in its life to the initial (100 hour) luminous flux;

© ‘Lamp survival factor’ (LSF), which is the defined fraction of the total number of lamps that continue to operate at

a given time under defined conditions and switching frequency;

(d) ‘Lamp lifetime’, which is the period of operation time after which the fraction of the total number of lamps which

continue to operate corresponds to the lamp survival factor of the lamp, under defined conditions and switching

frequency;

(e) ‘Chromaticity’, which is the property of a colour stimulus defined by its chromaticity coordinates, or by its

dominant or complementary wavelength and purity taken together;

(f) ‘Luminous flux’ (Φ), which is a quantity derived from radiant flux (radiant power) by evaluating the radiation

according to the spectral sensitivity of the human eye, measured after 100 hours of lamp running time;

(g) ‘Correlated colour temperature’ (Tc [K]), which is temperature of a Planckian (black body) radiator whose

perceived colour most closely resembles that of a given stimulus at the same brightness and under specified

viewing conditions;

(h) ‘Colour rendering’ (Ra), which is the effect of an illuminant on the colour appearance of objects by conscious or

subconscious comparison with their colour appearance under a reference illuminant;

(i) ‘Specific effective radiant ultraviolet power’, which is the effective power of the ultraviolet radiation of a lamp

weighted according to the spectral correction factors and related to its luminous flux (unit: mW/klm);

(j) ‘Lamp start time’, the time needed, after the supply voltage is switched on, for the lamp to start fully and remain

alight;

(k) ‘Lamp warm-up time’, which is the time needed for the lamp after start-up to emit a defined proportion of its

stabilized luminous flux;

(l) ‘Power factor’, which is the ratio of the absolute value of the active power to the apparent power under periodic

conditions;

(m) ‘Luminance’, which is the amount of light, per unit of apparent surface, that is emitted by or reflected by a

particular area within a given solid angle (unit: cd/m2);

(n) ‘Lamp mercury content’, which is the mercury contained in the lamp and is measured according to the Annex to

Commission Decision 2002/747/EC (1).

Table 6 on page 10 for example deals with EXACTLY how you can label the bulbs when comparing to the claimed equivalent incandescent bulb.

So whilst most stuff we see the EU doing just seems to be a wind-up, they are actually TRYING to sort this stuff out.

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Posted

And with respect to the question of heat given off:

A 100 watt incandescent bulb produces 100 watts of heat (actually power). From an energy point of view, it puts out 100 Joules of energy every second.

What temperature rise this causes depends on a lot of factors, room size, air flow, etc.

specific heat capacity of dry air is 1.00 kJ/kgC

Density of air at 30C is 1.2 kg/m³

Take a small closed room, 4 m x 4 m x 3 m or 48 m³ with 1 100w bulb.

48 m³ x 1.2 kg/m³ = 58 kg of air

100J = 1000 J/kgC x ∆T x 58 kg

∆T = 0.0017 deg C, very small change in temp.

but this occurs every second, so in an hour, we would have a 6 degree C rise. or 11 deg F

So in a small enclosed room, one 100w bulb will cause the temp to go up 11 degrees F per hour. Actually a lot.

Add a few more bulbs and it goes up a lot more. But make the room larger or open a door, and it goes up a lot less.

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Posted

So after 10 hours it will be 110°F in the room will it?

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Posted

Interesting physics discussion. Obviously the heat will be absorbed by the walls, and then the walls will release the heat to the outside - as happens with all forms of household heating. I assume if you stuck a bulb in a very heavily insulated box...it would indeed get fucking hot.

Trying to work in my head...what happens after like a week? I guess if 90% insulated, the energy going in must go somewhere, and it just gets nuclear until the bulb is melted?

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Posted

As a young girl, I used to bake little cakes with my Easy-Bake Oven using just a light bulb. I guess it will no longer be on the market 'cause I doubt it will work with the new bulbs. :(

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Posted

Good call. Those things heat up to 375 degrees with a maximum 100 Watt bulb. It's a shame they are not big enough to fit Allershausen as I could imagine an interesting experiment.

As it happens "specialist" bulbs are excluded from the regulations. For example an infrared bulb like this one would still be sellable:

post-544-1239021790.jpg

Try heating your house with just light bulbs that you've got in your house next winter. You'll freeze!

Switch to only CFL bulbs next winter, spend exactly the same on heating - and you'll also freeze.

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