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Where to donate second-hand clothes

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Posted

Where to drop of clothing question.

 

As we depart Berlin tonight, we have significantly downsized our luggage and would like to donate used clothing and a travel case rather then throw it all out. We are leaving from Charlottenburg to Schonefeld so if possible, would like to drop off enroot...are there charity bins for Oxfam etc?

 

Thanks!

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Posted

What a shame that you are leaving Berlin!

 

It would be great if you could drop off your clothes in a drop bin for someone like 'Humana' - check out the link below for all of their shops located in Berlin (they have drop off boxes outside most of them!)

 

Happy travels and be safe!

 

x

 

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=humana+berlin

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Posted

There are usually some boxes from Red Cross where you can drop off clothing and shoes.

They can be found at some intersections.

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Posted

Hi all,

I have a heaping pile of winter clothes I no longer need. They are in nice condition--some sweaters, scarves and even a warm, down-filled winter coat. I am moving back to the states soon and don't have space to take it all with me. I do not want to just donate it to a second hand shop, as they are packed with stuff already and tend to sell things at expensive prices. I'd like to find a charity/organization that gives used clothing to people who really need it and for free.

 

Any ideas? (I'm in Berlin) It'd be nice to just find a drop-off place, etc.

Thanks!!

 

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Posted

The only clothing 'bin' I can think of is at Ernst Thaelman Park on Lilli Henoch Strasse just by Greifswalder Str. S bahn (I pass it on the way to the swimmng pool there). The only thing about those bins is that I once saw a documentary about "eastern European" gangs who either break into them or put small kids inside them and empty them out, taking the stuff and selling it on in Russia and the baltics. This was a UK/Ireland thing-not sure if it happens here.

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Posted

What I usually do is just double-bag my old clothes in garbage bags and tape a sign saying 'dry, warm clothes' to it, and put it out - you have pretty good odds of someone who really could use it taking them home (if they have a home).

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Posted

Thanks for the responses everyone! And for what it's worth, I've heard some majorly sketchy things about Humana and other used clothes drop sites. I did some research and here's some information. I like the suggestion to just put the clothes in a plastic bag on the street and hopefully someone who can really use them will just pick them up.

 

“People to people” is their slogan. And considering the accusation of Humana being a cult, this slogan gets a slightly different sound. While you think you post your old clothes to charity when donating them to the Humana box, you might actually support a fraudulent cult that exploits both volunteers and people in development countries.

 

According to Tvind Alert, a Humana critical site, “it’s pyramidal structure, strict heirarchy, all-powerful leader, millennial goals, secretive nature and hostility to outsiders all match classic descriptions of a cult. Under the name ‘Tvind’ or ‘Humana’, it is listed as a cult by the French and Belgian governments and many cult watchdog groups around the world.” The organization also operates under the names “Planet Aid” and “Gaia”.

 

Peterson, founder of the organisation, has been disappeared for 22 years, and catched by the FBI while living in a Humana funded billionaire’s house near Miami. After courts in Denmark, he’s on the run again and since Jaunary 2009 on the list of Interpol.

 

The clothing collection is a profitable business. While the textiles are collected for free, the best pieces are sold in second hand stores, and the rest shipped to Africa to sell on the local markets. According to some specialists, the dumping of second hand clothing in developing countries has had a crushing effect on local economies. This is not a Humana problem alone, also more credible NGO’s have been involved in this process. Also, specialists don’t have one standing point there and some still state that sending clothing as aid works.

 

So, what to do with your next clothing dump? I suggest: organize a clothes swapping party. It’s much fun and you know where your clothes go. And with the rest? Also an NGO label on the container doesn’t give you any guarantee that your clothes are not gonna be sold on a profitable base. In Germany, the organization FairWertung informs about credible organizations and which containers to trust. In the future, I hope I can just bring my old clothes to the nearby climateneutral cradle-to-cradle machine and get fresh underwear out on demand. But yeah, until then we have to cradle to cradle with our bare hands…“People to people” is their slogan. And considering the accusation of Humana being a cult, this slogan gets a slightly different sound. While you think you post your old clothes to charity when donating them to the Humana box, you might actually support a fraudulent cult that exploits both volunteers and people in development countries.

 

According to Tvind Alert, a Humana critical site, “it’s pyramidal structure, strict heirarchy, all-powerful leader, millennial goals, secretive nature and hostility to outsiders all match classic descriptions of a cult. Under the name ‘Tvind’ or ‘Humana’, it is listed as a cult by the French and Belgian governments and many cult watchdog groups around the world.” The organization also operates under the names “Planet Aid” and “Gaia”.

 

Peterson, founder of the organisation, has been disappeared for 22 years, and catched by the FBI while living in a Humana funded billionaire’s house near Miami. After courts in Denmark, he’s on the run again and since Jaunary 2009 on the list of Interpol.

 

The clothing collection is a profitable business. While the textiles are collected for free, the best pieces are sold in second hand stores, and the rest shipped to Africa to sell on the local markets. According to some specialists, the dumping of second hand clothing in developing countries has had a crushing effect on local economies. This is not a Humana problem alone, also more credible NGO’s have been involved in this process. Also, specialists don’t have one standing point there and some still state that sending clothing as aid works.

 

So, what to do with your next clothing dump? I suggest: organize a clothes swapping party. It’s much fun and you know where your clothes go. And with the rest? Also an NGO label on the container doesn’t give you any guarantee that your clothes are not gonna be sold on a profitable base. In Germany, the organization FairWertung informs about credible organizations and which containers to trust. In the future, I hope I can just bring my old clothes to the nearby climateneutral cradle-to-cradle machine and get fresh underwear out on demand. But yeah, until then we have to cradle to cradle with our bare hands…

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Posted

I suggest if you have time to take your used things to the flea market and sell them for something like 50 cents a piece or even give them away for free (although sometimes it's easier to sell than to give things away). At some of the flea markets it's only 6 euros for a square meter to set up a clothing rail or lay down a tarp with things on it.

 

You can then make sure that your things are going to someone who actually wants them and you can donate any money earned to a charity of your choice, instead of putting them in a bin and having no idea where they go.

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Posted

Wow that really made me think about Humana and everything involved within it. In fact, because the prices are sky rocketing across all of the shops in Berlin I for one have vowed not to further encourage their greedy ways as they have obviously cottoned on that the 'Humana look' is actually a trend in fashion around the capital. I have turned my attention (and unwanted items!) to the free shop in Berlin!

 

http://www.umsonstladen.info/index_en.html

 

The Unsomstladen is one of the BEST ideas I have EVER read or seen and I for one am all for giving any unwanted articles to this shop so that people who REALLY have NOTHING can get something back from this consumerist world we live in. PLEASE tell everyone to go and donate to the shop in ANY form as they are facing massive legal problems and ANY amount if interest will benefit them - and the people who go there who genuinely have NOTHING!

 

xxxx

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Posted

Unfortunately, the Umsonstladen is closed. The police kicked everyone out of the building yesterday including the free shop. Now I have to figure out some other way to donate my used clothing. :(

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Posted

I wouldn't be too upset winklet. If the clothes were any good they were removed a sold to second hand shops.

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Posted

another alternative is to bring used clothes to an event called Fashion Reloaded held during fashion week in january

its essentially a huge clothing swap http://www.fashionreloaded.com/index.php?/where--when/ along with other fashiony goings-on

didnt go last year but heard great things about it

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Posted

For your clothes that are not in the best shape, there is this AMAZING art supply place. It's called Kunst-Stoffe Berlin. http://www.kunst-stoffe-berlin.de/

 

It's a place where artists (like me!) can pick up supplies for a donation. You can contribute to something beautiful!

 

But if your clothes are in good condition, I would be a shame to not have them reused by someone who could really use them. I'm new to Berlin, so I don't have any suggestions other than free boxes. There is a free box at the the Bethanien (http://www.yorck59.net/).

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Posted

Hi

Cleaning out some clothes that are in way too goo shape to just throw out - does anyone know of a charity that accepts clothes, kind of a berlin salvation army deal? Closeness to PB a big plus...

 

thanks!

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Posted

there are clothing donation boxes (like large post boxes) on most streets.

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Posted

thanks westvan, there's an oxfam near us, I'll try that!

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Posted

 

there are clothing donation boxes (like large post boxes) on most streets.

 

Has anyone got a list (or a Google Maps link) of the locations of those boxes?

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