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Translations and apostille service

19 posts in this topic

Posted

Anyone any experience with getting an Apostille (kind of legalising label for international purposes on official document) on a German document (e.g. certificate of residency, birth certificate, whatever)? Is there somewhere in Munich that does it, or is a trip to Berlin required? (in the UK you have to go to the Foreign Office in London). I deal a lot with Russian bureacracy, and there's nothing they like more than translated documents with fresh, hot-off-the-presses apostilles!

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Posted

Apostilles are dished out by the Amtsgericht in Germany - takes about 3 days, costs vary on the value of the transaction. And no need to visit Berlin, you can get it done in Munich.

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Posted

is this the same as a notary? If not anyone know how the German notary process works? I am trying to get my German Ham Radio license and apparently they need my U.S. license notarized ( i think ). They also may need it translated, I have no idea where I can get that done officially

 

I need to learn the language!

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Posted

I had to get one from the State of Florida certifying that the first one that I got from the State of Florida was actually real???

It is an official document that states that the first official document is official! :lol:

And they do have to be translated. German beauracracy at it's finest.

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Posted

I just had something apostilled (?) this summer. It was a U.S. document, so it was done through the secretary of state's office there. The consulate referred me, after the Germans told us there's no way to get it done in Germany. It took I think something like 2 weeks all in all.

As far as the notary: I'm not sure about Munich, but here in Augsburg I just got some stuff notarized at the city hall (Stadt Augsburg), same office you go to to for your Anmeldung.

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Posted

Right...allow me to explain. I'm a trainee Notary, hopefully only a very short distance from being fully qualified (I'm waiting for a letter today or next week). The apostille is an internationally recognised certificate that authenticates the Notary's signature - it ensures that a foreign jurisdiction can have confidence that the Notary's signature on the relevant doc. is real. Most Western countries accept the apostille, but a lot of South America and the Arab World will require legalisation by their consulates.

Your Notary in Germany probably won't be sure if it needs an apostille if it's something a little out of the ordinary - you're better off calling the place abroad that will receive the document - banks and finance houses often won't want it, but government agencies and so on probably will. For example I regularly incorporate companies in Germany from England - the documents need to be notarised and then apostilled as they're being received by a Court (i.e. State body).

As for notarising HAM radio permits - I have no idea what a German Notary would say about it - you'll probably need it certified in the U.S. by a U.S. Notary (U.S. Consulate should be able to help) and then apostilled (State Dept. in Washington if you're abroad I think)... You can't get an apostille in Germany for a document signed by a foreign Notary.

If you want a good German Notary (I'm in London so don't PM me unless you want to come to London) I recommend Dr. Beate Kopp - 089 55 68 29-0 - she speaks excellent English - mention me (James) if you do call.

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Posted

Did anybody get an apostille for a US marriage licence in Germany? Is that possible or does it have to be done in the US? Where can it be done in Munich? Thanks

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Posted

I never bothered doing it, but you're supposed to get it from the county recorder's office in the county where you got married.

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Posted

Hi,

 

I got married in Sweden (Swedish citizen) and also bumped into the German bureaucracy at it's best... :angry: I have a marriage certificate (issued in English!!!) from the Swedish tax office (that's where they issue these in my beautiful Scandinavian country). Now I need to send it back for Apostille and to have it translated. Does anyone know a good AND cheap AND fast translation office? Please Please Please? :)

 

PS just the other side of the coin: I went to Sweden with two extracts from the German registry and I got married the same day. No apostille, no translation ("We speak that much German here", said the Lady at the tax office...). Of course you can't expect that every German in their Gemeinde-offices would speak Swedish, but for God's sake, English is not that un-common now-a-days... But no, sir, they refuse to have anything but German... I'm just curious if anyone else finds it irritating.

 

BTW I need that translation (English-German) office :)

 

Luv ya'll

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Posted

I work a lot with Müller in Hohenzollernstrasse 13, mostly done within 2 days, not too expensive.

As to people speaking German only - they are German and live and work in Germany. Even in municipal offices people cannot be expected to speak every language with which they might be confronted. (my 2 cents)

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Posted

I used a lady by the name of Almuth Meßerer-Jaworski (089-168 4 168), she is over on Aldringenstr next to the U, and was able to get our US marriage certificate translated the same day for 100 Euro (i believe she charges 1.50 a line). She was nice as could be.

 

Found her on a PDF of official translators on the US Consulate website here.

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Posted

I was also going to use Mrs Meßerer-Jaworski to get my birth certificate translated and certified and after a slightly bizarre email exchange, I popped around to drop it off.

 

Now: the certificate is a new copy of the original, handwritten record. She made no attempt to hide her disgust that I would dare bring her something handwritten and complained that it would take her longer to decipher and translate the document (which is only one page long anyway) and asked why I hadn't mentioned that before?

 

She then sat down, took out her notepad and pen and asked me to read it out to her. I pointed out that if I wanted to do that, I might as well translate it myself, to which she replied "you're not allowed to" and kept on complaining that her time is very valuable.

 

I wanted to say "I know, that's why I'm paying you to translate it!", but I just left. I googled another translator (multilingua) just on the other side of the ring and dropped it off without any fuss.

 

I debated whether I should post this (clearly this woman has no problem scaring off customers without my help), but the whole exchange was just so bizarre, unprofessional and a waste of time, I just wanted to let you know to avoid her.

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Posted

RE: post by adrianthomas

 

1. Handwritten certificates:

- A sworn translator like me is liable for the correctness of the translation and subject to German Criminal Law.

- Therefore, guessing what handwritten texts could mean is prohibited. I have to ask the customer himself what is written in the document. NORMALLY, the customer presents a typed version of the text, names etc. It was the first time in my long career that a customer refused to help decipher the text. In case of a handwritten document or many handwritten entries this can take a long time because very often even the customer himself doesn't know.

This may have been the case here and the reason why the customer did not want to cooperate.

2. The customer told me "If I wanted to read out the handwritten text to you I might as well translate it myself":

- This remark shows that the customer is not familiar at all with the translation business and its legal requirements. And to tell me what the handwritten text means is surely not a translation. Certified translations as the ones he needed can only be made by sworn translators. It is the law itself which prohibits the customer who is no sworn translator to translate his own or any other documents.

4. The customer thought he would pay me for the time I decipher his text:

- The price charged for a translation does not include the time I have to sit deciphering handwritten texts. This time is not invoiced at all.

- Therefore, I allowed myself the remark that it would have been very helpful if he had done this already before submtitting the document to me.

5. Bizarre email exchange at the beginning:

- When the customer first contacted me I was in Berlin, not in Munich. (My mother had just died).

Therefore, I pointed out to him that I could help him right now, that he would have to wait for about one week till I would be back in Munich. However, he didn't mind to wait. This is the only reason I can imagine why he found the e-mail exhange "bizarre".

I am surely sorry that the customer was upset but I hope you see now that sworn translators are subject to strict legal rules.

Of couse, it would have been helpful if the customer had cooperated instead of arrogantly insisting on his expectations which I was not allowed to meet.

 

Thank you very much.

 

Almuth Meßerer-Jaworski

Fachübersetzungen

Englisch - Spanisch - Deutsch

Jura und Wirtschaft

Beglaubigungen

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Posted

I need an apostille for a German birth certificate from Munich. Thought I'd look into TT for the answer, but boy, is this thread crap. Took me another minute or two on Google to find the right place.

 

For future reference:

 

http://www.regierung.oberbayern.bayern.de/aufgaben/sicherheit/apostille/ (in German)

 

Call and check first if they are the right people to apostille the document in question. Some docs, even if from Bayern, need to go to other courts, etc. Then mail it with a letter stating the purpose of the apostille and for what country it is; or go in person. It will cost you about 15 € per document, plus a fee if its done through Deutsche Post.

 

EDIT: and by crap I mean, not to the point addresses by the OP. There is still useful info in here, but not for the purposes of apostille in Munich.

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Posted

If you are in Lower Franconia it is done in Wurzburg. Link with information (in German) available here: http://www.regierung.unterfranken.bayern.de/aufgaben/1/2/00533/index.html.

The document can be posted to them, or you can go personally (make appointment).

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Posted

Canada does not recognize the Apostille. For accurate info, check out this link:

 

For acceptance in Germany, the Canadian Marriage Certificate or document must be first signed by Foreign Affairs Canada and then legalized by the German Embassy in Ottawa.

 

Step one: The link to Service Canada for the authentication of Canadian documents.

 

http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/goc/authentication.shtml

 

Step two: The link to legalization of Canadian documents at the German Embassy in Ottawa.

 

http://www.canada.diplo.de/Vertretung/kanada/en/02/legalization/__legalization.html

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Posted

Hi

Can somebody recommend me a cheap translator in Munich?

Tina

 

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

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